Lubrication for aluminum against aluminum?

My main question is in the last paragraph.
Recently bought these ski poles as an addition for greater exercise and for handling rough terrain on my 100mm wheel skates.
http://www.e-omc.com/catalog/new_images/large/186.jpg
I was really impressed after putting a lot of weight on that and seeing the bottom aluminum section bend way out of shape without buckling or remaining even slightly bent.
I want to add springs, so I guessed and bought this stainless steel spring from Mcmaster.com.
9663K34 Type 302 SS Cont Length Compression Spring 20" Length, .750" OD, .091" Wire Diameter
Thanks for that store advice. They shipped very quickly for a good price.
I have some ideas about how to secure the springs.
What, if anything, should I use to lubricate the telescoping aluminum shafts? On hand, I have WD-40, silicon spray lubricant (mainly for rubber/plastic), machine oil, and light grease. Wear will probably occur at the opening of the larger section where the smaller section enters.
Thank you.
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John Doe wrote:

WD-40 is *no* lubricant. It is junk that *can* be used to clean parts. It comes in a nice can and they do have a good adverticing department.
Use PTFE (Teflon) lube.
Nick
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Here we go again. First off let me concede that WD40 may very well not be as good a lubricant as other choices, however it does lubricate, (as does plain water) therefore it is a lubricant.
It is basically a light oil in a solvent, when the solvent evaporates the light oil remains. It is a good choice where you need a little bit of lube in places where you need capillary action to carry the lubricant to do its job.
It has some very redeeming qualities. First it is cheap. Second it is in almost everyone's house or shop. Third it is not likely to do any damage to any mechanism unless you are flushing out a grease like in a bearing.
Teflon, silicone, molly, graphite, etc all have applications where they are superior, but good old WD40 is often the only lubricant some things ever see, so I would suggest that it definitely has it's place.
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Roger Shoaf

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Roger Shoaf wrote:

I think that says it all. WD-40 -and whatever other name they have- all fail for long time lubrication. They wash off any real oil/grease, lubricate for 10 minutes then are evaporated and the part seizes and rusts. Is that what is meant by "multipurpose"?
Nick
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Mutipurpose because it has 2 uses- cleaner and flamethrower.
Its my favorite degreaser.
Dave
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WD-40 is very good for disolving gummed up WD-40 deposits.
Wes
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snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com wrote:

LOL! Another use for WD-40. :-))
Nick
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I think telescoping aluminum shafts are a bad idea, and that you want one of them to be a harder and different material. Two moving parts of the same material and hardness may gall themselves together, regardless of the lubricant used. You should experiment, though.
John Martin
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wrote:

Smear a bit of silver anti-sieze on the moving parts.
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John Martin wrote:

Exception to this general rule is iron on iron, such as piston rings and cylinder sleeves. All else is a no-no I'm told.
Jordan
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Even that is not as simple as it sounds. In the case of piston rings and cylinders, for instance, the Rings are normally much harder than the cylinder. That is the important point. For good sliding bearings, one normally runs soft and hard materials together. Materials that have similar properties don't usually make good bearings.
Extruded aluminium doesn't tend to make very good bearings against anything :-(
Mark Rand RTFM
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Cast iron rings are about the same hardness as cast iron cylinders, but cast has little or no galling tendencies. It glazes very well. An exception might be the really hard cast iron used in older Mopar engines, or the cast steel cylinders I encountered on some English compressors. Hard stuff to machine. Aluminum on aluminum is a bad one. It might work for a little while if Never-Seize or Copper-Coat were used on it.
Dan
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wrote:

http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/ProductDetail.aspx?p 45&title=TEFLON%2fMOLY+OVEN+CURE%2c+GUN+FINISH
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Telescoping aluminum sections are likely to wear rapidly, no matter what lube you use. You can try the Syntec synthetic lube gel with Teflon that True Value sells, but I'd redesign it so the telescoping part ran in some kind of bearing like Delrin. Aluminum against aluminum is going to fret, no matter what you put on it. You're going to have black greasy gunk coming out whatever you use.
Stan
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I really appreciate the discussion. I will use some suggested lubricant now, and probably provide a bearing in a later design or rebuilding. The stainless steel spring must be attached to both halves of the telescoping aluminum, so the spring will be slightly unwound where it meets the wooden block and tacked together, then the wooden block will be trimmed with a burr. The bottom end of the spring is experimentally attached simply with a stainless steel hose clamp. I posted some pictures of the current progress (about 7 MB). Thanks again.
Newsgroups: alt.binaries.pictures Subject: spring-loaded rollerski poles 01
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There is a product called "Aluma Lube", sold in better Hardware stores, and designed to lubricate sliding aluminum door tracks without building up lots of imbedded dirt. It also works well to lubricate my motor home awning supports.
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and
lots
Of course your Aluminum door and awning are anodized putting a very hard skin on them.
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