Mechanical Aptitude Test

Have a question or want to show off your project? Post it! No Registration Necessary.  Now with pictures!

Threaded View


 Found this site on RMH, posted here for
 your enjoyment:

 http://tinyurl.com/379fuh

 Look for the review button to see your
 test results.
 Phil Kangas



--  

Mechanical Aptitude Test
Found this site on RMH, posted here for
your enjoyment:

http://tinyurl.com/379fuh

Look for the review button to see your
test results.
Phil Kangas



--  

Re: Mechanical Aptitude Test
Hmmmmm..........  94%
1 error due to clicking the wrong button, the other two have some poorly
worded questions:  are the fans direction specified as both from the
front/rear of each or viewed as a system?  And gear drive nomenclature
could use a bit of work.

Phil Kangas wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Re: Mechanical Aptitude Test
Phil Kangas wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

That was fun!

Got any more?

Re: Mechanical Aptitude Test
Phil Kangas wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

92% but I had the same sorts of concerns about the ambiguous ones as
others have already posted.

If a switch can't be considered a series element in a circuit why do we
tend to say, "Just put a switch in series with it." ???

Because of question 31, I don't think even Einstein could have scored
100% unless he just tossed a dart at the answers to that question and
"got lucky".

Jeff

--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Mechanical Aptitude Test
Jeff Wisnia wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

A switch is ALWAYS in series with the ENTIRE CIRCUIT, just not
considered as a component of the load.

Jim Chandler

Re: Mechanical Aptitude Test
92%.   I blew it on the planetary drive and worm gear (dumb moves in
both cases) but the fan and  the piston-sucking questions were
ambiguous.   I don't think it would matter which way the first fan was
blowing, as long as it was blowing TOWARD the second fan.
    Ond the piston-suck vs atmosphere-pushing, it all depends on how
esoteric you want to be.    That's the only one where I had to actually
guess.   I chose "suck" because it implied that the piston was moving,
whereas the "atmosphere" may or may not have gone down the hole with NO
piston movement.

Pete Stanaitis
---------------

Phil Kangas wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Re: Mechanical Aptitude Test

Quoted text here. Click to load it

The way I resolved the ambiguity was to consider how such a setup would
look if seen from the side, as shown in the drawing.  The blades would
seem to be rotating in the same direction, never mind that the fans
point in opposing directions.


Quoted text here. Click to load it

I guessed too, but in defense of the atmosphere answer, if this little
experiment happened in a vacuum, no sucking would happen no matter how
hard the piston tried, so the atmosphere is essential.

Joe Gwinn


Quoted text here. Click to load it

Re: Mechanical Aptitude Test
"Phil Kangas" wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Interesting, thanks.  I got an 82%, most of which were gear issues, half of
which were due to over-confidence on simple ones (my achilles heal).

Jon



Re: Mechanical Aptitude Test
kinda amusing - I got 92% - at least once I hit the wrong answer and hit
submit just as my brain said "that's wrong" -

I wonder if the test results correlate with anything

Quoted text here. Click to load it



--

Re: Mechanical Aptitude Test


Jon Danniken wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Well, I got a 90%, (also got messed up on worm gears) but I think
there's room to quibble on two others.

#15 presumes a frictionless pulley - I live in the real world and know
that a straight lift with no pulley requires the least force.

#31 has no correct answer stated. The correct answer is 60 since the
actual mechanical ratio for the lever is 5:1.

I had the same problems with poorly written questions in college. My
professors did not seem amused...

Carla

Re: Mechanical Aptitude Test

94% here (also messed up the worm gears)

Quoted text here. Click to load it

And also #24, which they describe as a parallel circuit. Sure, the two lamps
are in parallel -- but they're in series with the switch...

--
Regards,
        Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)

We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Mechanical Aptitude Test
spambait@milmac.com (Doug Miller) fired this volley in

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I thought just a moment about that, then considered that the switch and
power are ALWAYS in series when supplying a load.... <G>  the nature of a
circuit is expressed concerning the load arrangement, not the power
source.


One question I found ambiguous, because two answers are true to some
degree was the one about the normally aspirated engine.  Yes, atmospheric
pressure pushes the air charge in, but it wouldn't push it in unless
"suction" (lowered pressure) were created by the piston moving down.

LLoyd


Re: Mechanical Aptitude Test
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I agree, Lloyd.  I also had a question about the pressure differential
in the venturi setup.  I think tube A would have some height in it while
tube B would be evacuated. I also question the direction of rotation on
the worm gear.

Jim Chandler

Re: Mechanical Aptitude Test

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I did too; I thought they'd made a mistake. After the third look at it,
though, I decided the answer given is correct.


--
Regards,
        Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)

We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Mechanical Aptitude Test
spambait@milmac.com (Doug Miller) writes:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

The load is parallel.

Re: Mechanical Aptitude Test
Doug Miller wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Switches are not considered as part of the circuit for series/parallel
determination.

Jim Chandler

Re: Mechanical Aptitude Test
Quoted text here. Click to load it

    [ ... ]

Quoted text here. Click to load it

    Unless there is a series/parallel arrangement of switches to
implement "and" and "or" conditions.

    Enjoy,
        DoN.

--
    (too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Mechanical Aptitude Test

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Perhaps not by diesel mechanics.  They're treated the same as any
other circuit element in circuit network  analysis. For example, they
are sometimes used in parallel with other circuit elements,  as in the
question with three light bulbs.

98.


Re: Mechanical Aptitude Test
Don Foreman wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Still not considered a part of the load though, Don. As an amateur radio
operator (N5COT) and an Air force electronics tech. we never considered
a switch as p[art of the load.  It is part of the pathway to the load
resistance only.

Jim Chandler

Site Timeline