Mechanical Aptitude Test

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Found this site on RMH, posted here for your enjoyment:
http://tinyurl.com/379fuh
Look for the review button to see your test results. Phil Kangas

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"Phil Kangas" wrote:

Interesting, thanks. I got an 82%, most of which were gear issues, half of which were due to over-confidence on simple ones (my achilles heal).
Jon
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kinda amusing - I got 92% - at least once I hit the wrong answer and hit submit just as my brain said "that's wrong" -
I wonder if the test results correlate with anything

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Jon Danniken wrote:

Well, I got a 90%, (also got messed up on worm gears) but I think there's room to quibble on two others.
#15 presumes a frictionless pulley - I live in the real world and know that a straight lift with no pulley requires the least force.
#31 has no correct answer stated. The correct answer is 60 since the actual mechanical ratio for the lever is 5:1.
I had the same problems with poorly written questions in college. My professors did not seem amused...
Carla
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94% here (also messed up the worm gears)

And also #24, which they describe as a parallel circuit. Sure, the two lamps are in parallel -- but they're in series with the switch...
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) fired this volley in wrote:

I thought just a moment about that, then considered that the switch and power are ALWAYS in series when supplying a load.... <G> the nature of a circuit is expressed concerning the load arrangement, not the power source.
One question I found ambiguous, because two answers are true to some degree was the one about the normally aspirated engine. Yes, atmospheric pressure pushes the air charge in, but it wouldn't push it in unless "suction" (lowered pressure) were created by the piston moving down.
LLoyd
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Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

I agree, Lloyd. I also had a question about the pressure differential in the venturi setup. I think tube A would have some height in it while tube B would be evacuated. I also question the direction of rotation on the worm gear.
Jim Chandler
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I did too; I thought they'd made a mistake. After the third look at it, though, I decided the answer given is correct.
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) writes:

The load is parallel.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Switches are not considered as part of the circuit for series/parallel determination.
Jim Chandler
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    [ ... ]

    Unless there is a series/parallel arrangement of switches to implement "and" and "or" conditions.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Perhaps not by diesel mechanics. They're treated the same as any other circuit element in circuit network analysis. For example, they are sometimes used in parallel with other circuit elements, as in the question with three light bulbs.
98.
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Don Foreman wrote:

Still not considered a part of the load though, Don. As an amateur radio operator (N5COT) and an Air force electronics tech. we never considered a switch as p[art of the load. It is part of the pathway to the load resistance only.
Jim Chandler
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Jim Chandler wrote:

You say tomato and I say tomahto. <G>
Jeff
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On Sat, 20 Oct 2007 01:55:53 -0400, Jeff Wisnia

Indeed. It does what it does regardless of terminology you or I may use to describe it.
Don W0LAP
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    [ ... ]

    But switches can make logic arrays. In particular with relay logic. An example on a CNC machine could be a series of switches (axis limit switches) in series, with a parallel set of contacts on a manual override switch (which would also limit axis speeds to a minimum to allow you to move the axis with problems away from the limit switch.
    And for normal automotive applications, there are multiple door switches in parallel to control the dome light -- and those are in series with a master switch which often has three positions:
1)    Dome light *always* off.
2)    Dome light switched by door switches. Any single door, or any     combination of doors open turns on the light, otherwise it is     off.
3)    Dome light *always* on.
    So -- they can reasonably be referred to as being in series-parallel combinations.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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DoN. Nichols wrote:

But nowadays the dome light is probably controlled by the output of some damn computer and you'd have to be a digital Houdini to figure it all out.
The dome lights in our two "21st century" cars slooooooowly dim down to off under certain conditions of the doors, ignition, ambient lighting and G-d only knows what else. I haven't bothered to study that enough to understand it. That slow dimming to off suggest to me what dying might feel like someday. <G>
Jeff
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I think they got that one wrong as well. They seem to be assuming the center of mass of the two boxes is out at their far edges (that gives their answer, anyway).
I'd also quibble with 44 -- you have to know a bit more about what's going on downstream before you can predict what's going to happen in tube B. If the tube ends at the edge of the picture, you could get a vacuum in tube B...
There are some more where I got their answer, but I think other answers are equally valid: I got their answer for 48, but "suction" is just as good an answer for a mechanical aptitude test (it would be wrong in a physics test). Likewise for 49, what do they mean by "easiest"? Again, I got their answer, but I note diesel can be ignited with no spark at all.

Course not -- we know what the questions mean, you should read our minds! (I am a professor, and I'm joking)
Note -- I got 92. Missed the worm drive, two of the pulley questions had similar enough pictures that I thought I'd mis-clicked and missed one as a result, and the two quibbles above.
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On Thu, 18 Oct 2007 21:41:54 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm, "Jon

I got the gears but missed some of the pulleys, then I misread the balloon/atmosphere question. 84% here.
P.S: Did you find any of that polyester lead yet? <titter>
-- History is often stranger than fiction. Fiction has to be plausible. History is what happens when people don't follow the script. --pete flip, RCM
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I got 92%, fiddling around. It was not a bad test overall. It did have some ambiguous questions.

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