Wilton vise "Lifetime Warranty"....what it really means.

I broke the main cast iron frame of my Wilton C-3 vise the other day. In shopping for a replacement, I noticed on the Wilton Tool website that this vise has a "Lifetime Warranty". I called Wilton to get info on warranty replacement or repair. The man asked me how old is the vise....about 15 years, I said. After a moment, I learned that the "lifetime" of a Wilton vise is 6 years. After 6 years, the "lifetime warranty" expires.....how can they be comfortable in misleading the customer?....why not be ethical and advertise a "6 year warranty". This kind of thing pis_es me off to no end. Is this typical of how industrial manufacturers operate? I thought I'd feel better after venting here.....I don't. waverly

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All the vises I have broken, it was my own fault.

If you can get a 100 pound old mill vise, they won't break.

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I remember reading once that "A vise is the only tool that contains within itself the means of its own destruction." Is this true? If a vice contains the means of its own destruction, how can ANY vise be warranted at all?

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

This may actually be a federal crime, it is almost certainly a violation of FTC rules. It most likely is a crime in your state, as well. You can write a letter to your state's attorney general and the FTC (they may have an on-line forms on their web sites.) The term "lifetime" has an accepted legal definition, and a company that uses that word is bound by what Black's Legal Dictionary SAYS it means! They may have some fine print on their actual warranty card that will get them off the hook, but if the front of the card says "lifetime warranty" then a bunch of weasel-words on the back in half-mm type may not undermine it.

Jon

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After spending that much on a vise, I'd spend a day picketing in front of the store with a placard that says XXXXX SELLS CRAP. Or XXXXX DOESN'T HONOR WARRANTIES.

Picketing is a useful way to get a quick adjustment. BUT learn the rules first in your community. Usually they are, but not limited to: you have to stay on the sidewalk, you can't step into traffic (duh), you can't wave your sign into traffic, you can't impede pedestrians on the sidewalk in any way, you can't block ingress and egress of patrons or cars, you can't be vocal, you have to keep moving, you may talk to people about the issue IF they ask you first, and your local PD may have others. They may or may not have to be notified. The store may or may not need to be notified. Threatening to picket and notifying them in advance may get it settled without picketing. I have had issues twice where picketing came into play. Once, they replaced the item rather than have me picket, and the second time, I was there for about an hour and they offered me a new replacement tool.

I guess it all amounts to how much you want your pound of flesh.

And oh, yeah. Pick a nice weather day, and a busy one for them.

Steve

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Steve:

A few footnotes to your effort.

You can't be on private property without permission in general. I believe if the private property is an area to which the public customarily enjoys unpermitted access--like areas the "donation" crowd use to station themselves in front of stores--you should have a kindred right of access even if you are picketing. The last one your local PD may neither be aware of nor sympathetic to.

you can't step into traffic (duh), you can't wave your

You can be vocal. You just can't disturb the peace. Whatever the reporting authority decides that is.

It's really a free-speech question and the local PD should have none that are not nationally applicable. Period.

They may or may not have to

You don't have to notify anyone but see below for sage advice as to the immediate benefit of asking the store if they want to resolve things before or after.

Threatening to

It really should be a clear issue of a just cause. If you have a warranty, blow it up on picket signs with a notation "Would you want me to shop at a store that wouldn't honor your warranty?" That puts the other customers in your place. Have hand-out flyers. Blow up a dictionary definition of "lifetime" on a placard. Maybe the famous quote from Alice in Wonderland by the Red Queen "A word means what I say it means, no more, no less."

Regards,

Edward Hennessey

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Customer: "I'd like a refill. The sign says, 'All you can drink for 10 cents.'" Vendor: "One cupful IS all you can drink for 10 cents."

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I knew a guy who described a bicycle club descending on a small cafe at the end of a day's ride, and ordering "all you can eat". When the cafe was out of food, the owner did indeed explain that they'd had all they could eat...

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Now that one can't be disputed. Moxie.

Regards,

Edward Hennessey

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On Nov 13, 10:54 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Which lifetime, yours or the vise's? When it breaks its lifetime is over.

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On Tue, 13 Nov 2007 19:54:35 -0800, with neither quill nor qualm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com quickly quoth:

That's as bad or worse than Crapsman tool warranties, where you have to nearly cap the manager to get him to exchange a clearly marked Craftsman tool which bit the dust twice in three days.

F searz, F wilton. They'll get absolutely none of my business.

-- Real freedom lies in wildness, not in civilization. -- Charles Lindbergh

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Interesting -- I've never had any problem getting a replacement from Sears, including on tools that I'd basically abused to death (a socket that had been used with a hammer to drive a friction-fit part into place comes to mind).

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On 14 Nov 2007 09:11:59 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm, Joe

My memories of this are from the mid/late 70s and early 80s, when they had first gone with the trash vendors. I was in the store getting replacement sockets, ratchets, and such 3 or 4 times a week, usually with bandaged hands. Once I had to go to the store manager to get replacements, but usually the threat to go to him did it. HE got an earful that once, lemme tell ya. I don't recall having bought a searz tool since.

Not too many years after that, they were indicted for their parts replacement scams in the auto section, telling customers they needed parts that they didn't need. It cost 'em plenty. I'm surprised they're still in business. Their name is sure SHIT to me.

Given Wilton's ghastly pricing, their stuff should be built heavily enough to never need to be warrantied. Shame on them for a fake lifetime warranty.

-- Real freedom lies in wildness, not in civilization. -- Charles Lindbergh

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I got caught by that one -- it was before I did my own work on my cars, and they sold me several voltage regulators and alternators that, in retrospect, I almost certainly didn't need.

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