Actual home Made TIG Welder

Have a question or want to show off your project? Post it! No Registration Necessary.  Now with pictures!

Threaded View
Thought some of you might enjoy this.

http://www.turbomustangs.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=8872



Re: Actual home Made TIG Welder
can this actually work well? I might look into building one if it will work
ok. Seems like it would be a low cost way into tig welding.


Quoted text here. Click to load it



Re: Actual home Made TIG Welder

Quoted text here. Click to load it


Yes it would work, but it would be so much easier to just get a cheap
DC stick welder and use that as your power supply.

All you need then is a torch with a valve built into the handle, a
ground clamp, flowgauge and gas bottle.

You can get the whole kit from   www.tigdepot.com

Re: Actual home Made TIG Welder

:> can this actually work well? I might look into building one if it will work
:> ok. Seems like it would be a low cost way into tig welding.
:>
:>
:> > Thought some of you might enjoy this.
:> >
:> > http://www.turbomustangs.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=8872
:> >
:> >
:>
:>


: Yes it would work, but it would be so much easier to just get a cheap
: DC stick welder and use that as your power supply.

: All you need then is a torch with a valve built into the handle, a
: ground clamp, flowgauge and gas bottle.

: You can get the whole kit from   www.tigdepot.com

Yes, however a cheap dc stick welder will not have any means to remotely
adjust the current. And, with a small gas engine, you get a portable dc
tig rig.

I wonder if you could tap ahead of the diodes for ac tig.

An inductor would also help smooth the arc and that may be able to be
constructed from an old microwave oven transformer core with some turns of
heavy wire.

Regards,
Tom

Re: Actual home Made TIG Welder
Setting up remote amp control and on/off current is very easy with the
alternator setup. You can also put those controls on your rod holder,
thats a BIG help when laying on your back under a item to be welded.
Most alternators are rectified 3 phase, the cycles per second is very
high also. This does make for a nice welding current when cleaning is
needed. There are times I prefer my alternator welder over my 300 amp
TIG setup for DC stick welding.


Re: Actual home Made TIG Welder

Quoted text here. Click to load it

You can get a 130 amp DC inverter for about $300, if you don't mind
no-name taiwanese.
It has a dial on the front that gives you a full range of control of
your amps.

Heck the best small stick inverter is the Miller Maxstar 150, and it
costs under $600 new.

Re: Actual home Made TIG Welder
On Wed, 05 Nov 2003 07:09:03 GMT, Ernie Leimkuhler

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Hello,

Where did you see it under $600 ?
I can't find one on the web for less than $990!

Gil.

Re: Actual home Made TIG Welder
On Wed, 05 Nov 2003 15:41:27 GMT, the renowned gilgsn@nospam-yahoo.com
(Gil G.) wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I did a quick web search..

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2569191904&category=45031

He's got a few negs, but not many.


Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
--
"it's the network..."                          "The Journey is the reward"
speff@interlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Actual home Made TIG Welder

Quoted text here. Click to load it


B&R Welding sells direct from the web.
They use eBay a lot to sell machines.

If you search the eBay section for welding equipment you will hit a
bunch of their adds.

Just do a eBay word search for Maxstar 150.

Last time I checked they had the plain jane version of the Maxstar 150
sitting at $589.00.

Miller garauntees that you can run 1/8" 7018 from the Maxstar 150
plugged into a 110 volt outlet.

Re: Actual home Made TIG Welder
On Wed, 05 Nov 2003 19:32:13 GMT, Ernie Leimkuhler

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Thanks, I'll check that out...
What do you typically weld with 1/8" 7018 ?

Gil.

Re: Actual home Made TIG Welder
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Generally speaking, anything you can weld with 1/8" 6010, 6011 or 6013 etc. Mild
steel mostly. Some carbon steel also. 7018 done right is stronger than the above
mentioned and works well for the more demanding applications. It demands cleaner
material than the paper flux types but finishes prettier. If it's the only
electrode on hand in an emergency, you can manage to weld through a contaminated
surface. The X-Ray people will catch it though.

If a person has experience using 7018, they can then see that some machines burn
it better than others. I think Miller uses 7018 in the statement is because 7018
can be hard to start or restart once partially burnt. It is mostly due to the
hard flux coating and needs a high open circuit voltage to start. They want you
to know they stand behind you and their machine using that electrode.



Re: Actual home Made TIG Welder

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Thanks, I'll give 7018 a shot.. Being a beginner, I only have used
6010 so far, it seems really strong, but cosmetically isn't the best
looking one.. But of course that could be me too!

Have a great week-end,

Gil.

Re: Actual home Made TIG Welder
Quoted text here. Click to load it

If you aren't doing code welds, and just want higher strength / appearance,
try E7014.

Re: Actual home Made TIG Welder

Quoted text here. Click to load it


1/8" 7018 is the standard of eh industry for certified structural steel
welds.
Miller has worked very hard to make sure that their machines run 6010
and 7018 to the satisfaction of structural and pipe welders.
Both 6010 and 7018 have a history of being difficult or impossible to
use on small inverters due to the higher open circuit voltage both rods
like.
6010 is used for root passes on many pipe and sructural welds.
7018 is used for the mass of the weld.

Re: Actual home Made TIG Welder
On Wed, 5 Nov 2003 03:01:44 +0000 (UTC), tmiller@umaryland.edu wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Auto alternators are typically 6 phase. Welding is inherently a single
phase process. Or put another way, which wires would you use as the
ground electrode, and which the stinger? You'd have 7 to choose from,
but each is only capable of handling 1/6th of the output of the alternator.

The only way to combine them is to first rectify to DC, then they can
be ganged together to deliver full output. (DC adds directly, but AC
has to be *in phase* to add directly.)

Gary

Re: Actual home Made TIG Welder
: On Wed, 5 Nov 2003 03:01:44 +0000 (UTC), tmiller@umaryland.edu wrote:
:>I wonder if you could tap ahead of the diodes for ac tig.

: Auto alternators are typically 6 phase. Welding is inherently a single
: phase process. Or put another way, which wires would you use as the
: ground electrode, and which the stinger? You'd have 7 to choose from,
: but each is only capable of handling 1/6th of the output of the alternator.

: The only way to combine them is to first rectify to DC, then they can
: be ganged together to deliver full output. (DC adds directly, but AC
: has to be *in phase* to add directly.)


I always thought they used 3 phase, delta into a full wave bridge. Six diodes,
three to ground, three to positive out.  But then it's been a while since I
opened one up. Is this something currently done?

But in any event, you are right. You can't add them together.


Tom

Re: Actual home Made TIG Welder
On Thu, 6 Nov 2003 01:19:56 +0000 (UTC), tmiller@umaryland.edu wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Some are done that way, but they also use a wye connection
with six windings (7 wires) and six diodes.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Right, that's the important point here.

Gary

Re: Actual home Made TIG Welder
: On Thu, 6 Nov 2003 01:19:56 +0000 (UTC), tmiller@umaryland.edu wrote:

:>I always thought they used 3 phase, delta into a full wave bridge. Six diodes,
:>three to ground, three to positive out.  But then it's been a while since I
:>opened one up. Is this something currently done?

: Some are done that way, but they also use a wye connection
: with six windings (7 wires) and six diodes.

:>But in any event, you are right. You can't add them together.

: Right, that's the important point here.

Thanks for the info. I always enjoy your posts for the excellent technical
content.

Regards,
Tom

Re: www.tigdepot.com Help me Ernie.... w/ the AC/DC buzz box !!


Hi Ernie!

At this web page location :

( http://www.tigdepot.com/products/p35TD-BBTF.htm )

I read the following info......>

    Weld metals you never thought possible at a price that’s easy on     the
budget!!!!

    With your AC/DC 125/225 “Buzz Box”, and any of the conversion             kits
listed below, you can TIG weld Aluminum, Stainless Steel             and Chrome
Moly and many other metals.

    Plug it directly into your standard household outlet (110 volts,     15 amps).


.... I am confused why they mention using the AC/DC Box.... yet they
talk about using Neg. DC and Positive DC !!

and... you mention using the DC machine !!!

I just a little confused once again... It's all gving me a headache
again!  Thanks Ernie!

Jack






Quoted text here. Click to load it


--

To Reply:

Remove the first 'o' from my email address 'ojalin@comcast.net'!


Re: www.tigdepot.com Help me Ernie.... w/ the AC/DC buzz box !!

Quoted text here. Click to load it

AC/DC buzzboxes are pretty common.
You can use the AC to weld aluminum if you add a high frequency
generator to 6he system to sustain the arc in AC.

You don't really need the high freq for DC except to start the arc
cleaner.

If you only have a DC buzzbox then you can weld aluminum using DCEP
with an oversized tungsten.






Quoted text here. Click to load it

Site Timeline