cold weather starting - bobcat 250NT

my bobcat cranks immediately and revs to speed so fast that it makes me cringe to start it in cold weather. travelling several hours to outside jobsites in sub-zero temperatures is somewhat common and theres no way to preheat the engine. i guess my question would be am i damaging my engine by starting it in cold weather? can anything be done to prelube the engine? thanks,

--
Nathan W. Collier
http://UtilityOffRoad.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

by

Not likely. If in doubt, refer to the Mfr.

You can install a 'pre-lube unit' (applies pressure to the lube system before start) -or- install a switch to interupt the ignition system (crank the starter till oil pressure comes up, then switch on the ignition to start the engine).

You may also consider an 'oil treatment' such as Slick 50 as they leave a protective residue and all lubed parts.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

tried calling them earlier but was on hold for longer than i had cell signal.

this bobcat or miller specific, or are you referencing a generic setup?

thanks,

--
Nathan W. Collier
http://UtilityOffRoad.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I was describing a 'generic' setup. Prelubers are used on high performance motors.

Lots of info: http://tinyurl.com/j9yc7

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

yeah im familiar with the prelubers for automobiles.....i hoped you were referencing a miller specific unit. thanks, ill give miller a call in the morning.

--
Nathan W. Collier
http://UtilityOffRoad.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

me

outside

way to

engine by

engine?

If it is water cooled then can you not fit a pre-heater (block heater) into one of the freeze plug holes? If it is air cooled then there are ones that strap onto the sump (??oil pan in USA??) to pre-heat the oil. At the crudest you could use a 'sump heater' of the type that was used before anti-freeze was available consisting of a flat paraffin (??kerosene in USA??) burner with a gauze cover that you sit under the sump to keep it warm.

AWEM

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you drive to the work location - why not heat it on the way - Heater tape and if needed an inverter off the 12v to the 120.

Martin Martin Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder

Andrew Mawson wrote:

-

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Frankly (coming from a cold state), I think this issue gets blown out of proportion - ie, it's an armchair engineering worry more than a practical engineering problem. Put in Mobil 1 and call it good, if you are worried about it that much. More than anything, do the oil and filter changes on schedule.

Given the choice between expensive synthetic oil and not changing on schedule, and cheap (but still having full API seal, proper ratings, etc) oil and doing the changes on schedule, I'd bet on the latter method.

--
Cats, coffee, chocolate...vices to live by

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

this is what i was thinking, but figured i would ask for clarification. even at -20 my bobcat fires right up and it revs to set point immediately. although nobody else can seem to hear it, id swear i hear parts knocking when it does this. course, after a lifetime of banging and grinding my ears arent always honest with me.

--
Nathan W. Collier
http://UtilityOffRoad.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm from a cold weather state and you ALWAYS give the engine a chance to get lube flowing before you rev it up!! In Nathans's case, there should be an 'idle' or 'low power' throttle setting. Run it on low setting for a minute or so before going to full throttle. There is no need to run it at the low setting until it is fully warmed up.

BTW: my definition of cold weather is when you go out to the shed to grab the chainsaw and the 30 wt oil has turned white and congealed. Chain saw started and ran fine after we go the bar oil into it.

Nathan W. Collier wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

ummm, isn't there a throttle lever?????

every skidsteer I have ever seen had a throttle lever. idle for warm ups, wound out for operators who arent' that good, or are in a hurry.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

ummm, isn't there a throttle lever?????

every skidsteer I have ever seen had a throttle lever. idle for warm ups, wound out for operators who arent' that good, or are in a hurry.

if nothing else, you will eat the hydro pumps by cavitating them at full RPM when it is cold. The cold oil won't flow into the pumps fast enough, the pumps will cavitate, and will get cheweed up in short time.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This topic is in reference to a Miller Bobcat engine driven portable welder/generator not a Bobcat skidstear.

My Bobcat welder has a two position throttle switch, one of which goes to an idle after about 15 seconds of not welding it will stay at idle until there is a load applied. Idle in this case is about 2/3 full speed. It's all electronic and if possible would take some changing of parts on a circuit board. Something you'd have to find out from Miller.

It might be possible to crank the engine for a few seconds w/o the choke to get the oil flowing, then pull the choke out to get the engine started. Another way might be to short the ignition system while cranking the starter - probably involving circuit board. Again, check with Miller

--
J Miller
"Doug" < snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

same here. when i initially crank it, it still runs up full rev before settling down. this initial hit in the cold is what concerns me.

this is what ive been doing, but at 0 and below the oil is so thick that i have to wonder if the machine is generating enough pressure to push it through the tiny ports. thanks,

--
Nathan W. Collier
http://UtilityOffRoad.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Snowmachine oil

Run synthetic

and the best bet is to check with miller theyre form wisconsin they should have a decent idea of waht some cold is

and people use welders in alaska the north atlantic and the north sea so i'm sure EXTREME cold is not a new trick for them to deal with

Nathan W. Collier wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.