Drying E7018 and hardfacing welding rod

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I have a box of 3/32 E7018 welding rod that spent a while without being kept in a dryrod oven. Also a bunch of Stoody 21 hardfacing rod.

I am doing an experiment, I took a few of each kind of rods and I will dry them in a natural gas grill at the highest setting. Then I will compare how they work after being dried, with ones that I have not dried.

My grill can go to something like 730 degrees. I measured it with an infrared thermometer gun. Maybe it will rise to 750 or so.

Do you think that an hour at full temp ought to be enough?

i

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I did not wait long enough to measure the temperature. The temp rose to 870 degrees.

i

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Ignoramus3462 wrote:

You should not need a high temperature, just enough to evaporate moisture.

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This is not true.

The "moisture" in the rod is in chemical combination with the flux. It needs high temperature to break that chemical bond.

i i

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Ignoramus3462 wrote:

Ig, you're a hands-on kind of guy, right? How would you like to do an experiment? Dry a few at 750, and a few at, say, 250 - 300, and see which works best? And, just for us noobs, it might also help to say what happens with moist electrodes. I never knew there was a difference until just a couple of years ago.

Just another sidenote - after they've been dried, how long is it before they absorb moisture again?

Thanks! Rich

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Absorbing moisture again in bad shop conditions is all over in hours, I'm told. Hence hot quivers. There's drying ovens to 400degC - setable and accurately controlled. And hot quivers at about 120degC - simple, light, portable, robust and not controlled.

Basics ("lo-hi"'s / 7016/7018) are reckoned to saturate out at about the same hydrogen level as Rutiles (6013's). Sounds about right - was interested to see steam coming out of rod oven door when flipped it open to see how my rods were re-drying.

Rich S

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wrote:

You could dry one or two rods to constant weight and then see if a higher temperature decreased their weight.

The fumes from the burning gas contain water vapor.

http://www.keenovens.com/articles/7018-storage-2.htm

jsw

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I just measured the temperature in the grill again. It is now 930 degrees. Much hotter than I expected.

It is true that burning gas produces water vapor, but at 930 degrees, it should not matter, it is hot enough to release water from the chemical bond on electrode flux.

i

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Remember at that high a temperature the water will change to steam a lot faster than on a slow heat increase, and the steam could pop off the flux or cause cracking.

Steve

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It looks like the flux stayed on the rods. I only heated four or so, just to compare and learn something.

i

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What I have is an old convection oven. It was moms. We had a nice one so I took it to the shop as a small oven.

Bake or broil or Toast (both) with or without a fan. Has temp setting and time shutoff setting.

I hope to experiment with small things with power coating.

But cooking rods in a Bar-B-Que was me - I put the rods in vac bags. Then packed them into Tall Ammo cans.

When I open a can of rods, I put them into a Tall ammo can with rubber seal.

Martin

On 2/5/2011 8:58 AM, Ignoramus3462 wrote:

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Be careful. I'd say that fifteen minutes would be enough to get the water out. Longer might affect the ability of the flux to stick to the rod, or the glue holding it on if there is any. And cooling from that temperature could create cracked flux. Just thoughts, I'm not really sure. I knew when you bought all those rods that you were going to have moisture storage issues.

Steve

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"Ignoramus3462"

message

Check this out: http://www.metalsmith.org/edu/materials/weldrodstore.html

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Thanks.

OK, so I should be good then, it looks like.

I do not really need that, I will give this 7018 away to someone for welding practice. If I need to weld something and it requires 7018, I would rather use something known good. At $2 a pound, it is not too expensive.

I have a 50 lb oven where I keep welding rod.

But it would be a good thing to learn about.

i

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Ignoramus3462 wrote:

Here is what Lincoln Electric recommends (from Stick Electrode Product Catalog):

=========================================== One hour at the listed final temperature (for E7018/E7028: 650F-750F) is satisfactory. DO NOT dry electrodes at higher temperatures. Several hours at lower temperatures is not equivalent to using the specified requirements.

Any low hydrogen electrode should be discarded if excessive redrying causes the coating to become fragile and flake or break off while welding, or if there is a noticeable difference in handling or arc characteristics, such as insufficient arc force.

Electrodes to be re-dried should be removed from the can and spread out in the oven because each electrode must reach the drying temperature.

=========================================== Jon

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Here's a little update. Better measured at electrodes (and not just pointing the infrared thermometer at the lava stones), the electrodes get heated to 650 degrees inside the grill.

I did some comparisons of welds by dried and undried electrodes.

There is little visible difference with 7018 electrodes, great looking welds at 70 amps in both cases. Just two little tiny voids in a weld with an undried electrode. Might be random. These are Lincoln 7018 H4R electrodes and R stands for moisture resistance. So, perhaps, these rods did not pick up that much moisture in the first place.

I also compared the Stoody 21 hardfacing rods. Here, there is a huge difference and where I had voids surfacing with unbaked hardfacing rods, there are NO voids at all when I used a baked electrode. Just really great results.

I will rebake all my hardfacing rod.

i

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Ignoramus3462 wrote:

Did you hear the difference too?

John

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The hardfacing arc was more stable.

i

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Jon Danniken wrote:

I use my heat treating for drying welding rod. The oven has precise temp. control and enough room to spread out the rods. Buy rods in the smallest sealed package that they have .

John

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