Nose Gear Push Rod Guide Tube

Hello Everyone,
I am putting together a Tower Trainer 40 MKII ARF. The guide tube seems to
be too far to the
outside of the fuselage. When pushed out as far as it will go the gear is
basically facing straight
ahead. The rod is pushing the side of the tube. The gear shaft has a flat on it,
so the steering arm
cannot be positioned around gear.
Will this work, Please, or are there better ideas ? Drill out the guide
tube, enlarge the hole
toward inside of the fuselage and glue the tube back in with silicone glue.
Epoxy would just drain
into the enlarged hole ?
Any advice will be Gratefully Appreciated.
Thank You So Much,
Wayne
Reply to
Wayne
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Hi Wayne,
It seems there is never enough horizontal clearance in ARF nosegear pushrod tubes to allow the pushrod to move inboard and outboard as the nose steers. In the past, I have elongated the hole through the firewall to allow the rod to move as it needs to (making it more of a horizontal slot than a round hole), resealing the wood with epoxy or CA to fuel-proof it. Then look for a convenient spot to provide support fo the tube farther back in the fuselage.
I hope you have as much fun with your Tower Trainer 40 as I had with mine -- all three of them. :-) I still have the carcass of the last one laying around the shop.....
Good flying, desmobob
Reply to
Robert Scott
It may work, but probably not very well.
If it was my plane I would fix it so that a full range of motion was possible without binding. Otherwise the servo will have to work harder than it should which IMHO will mean earlier than expected failure or even disaster. It is hard to assess the best way to fix it without seeing the problem. A possibility would be a joggle in the control rod, or possibly relocation of the tube. I would guess that someone nearby can help you to figure out how to best fix this. Ask around at your field. The one great thing about this hobby is that there are lots of us who are ready to help you, all you have to do is ask.
Chris Connor
Reply to
Christopher J Connor
If the end of the guide tube is flush with the front of the firewall do you get any left turn at all? Sometimes you need to put a bit of a curve in the push rod to allow for the angle change as the rod moves in and out. Also, you really dont want a lot of nosewheel steering travel as it makes the plane very squirrelly when taking off and landing, especially when using the rudder to correct for crosswind. On the servo arm, you generally put the rudder rod on the outside hole but the nose wheel rod on the innermost so there wont be a lot of rod travel to begin with.
Reply to
Fubar of The HillPeople
Thanks Everyone,
There seems to plenty of travel, it is just to the left. There is no Right travel. The rod binds on the inside edge of the tube.
I will try working with the push rod first. That seems to be less work.
Elongating and sealing around the hole seems less work than moving the whole tube. I will try that second if needed.
I knew there were better ideas out there. :-)
Again Thank You Kindly,
Wayne
be too far to the
basically facing
flat on it, so the
tube, enlarge the hole
Epoxy would just drain
Reply to
Wayne
be too far to the
basically facing straight
it, so the steering arm
tube, enlarge the hole
Epoxy would just drain
Probably not the answer you want but how about converting it to a taildragger? Unless you are taking off from a solid surface the trike layout has some disadvantages.
Reply to
markzoom
to be too far to the
basically facing
it, so the steering
tube, enlarge the
Epoxy would just
Thank You for the suggestion,
The field I plan to fly it from is paved.
My second plane is already built. It's a Sig 4*40. I was planning to wait until some stick time for a taildragger. I will consider the suggestion before I attempt a fix. I had not thought of it.
Thank You for the idea,
Wayne
Reply to
Wayne
Wayne,
I have THREE Tower Trainer 40(s) with an O.S. MAX .46AX engine. One in the trash! One being used, and the THIRD still in the box.
I also have a Tower Trainer 60 with a Tower.61 BB ABC Engine (with lots of power).
This 40 is not only a trainer but a fun-fly plane. I do crazy things with it. That's why I have one in the trash. It's not only a fun plane, but it's the most inexpensive trainer that I have ever seen ($60) plus radio and engine.
The steering pushrod will work if it's installed correctly. (do NOT elongate the hole in the firewall) First, the end of the guide tube 'must be' flush with the firewall (follow gluing instructions in the manual). Second, the 'nose gear arm' can be installed up-side-down if you're not careful. It must line-up correctly with the 'Z' bend in the push rod. When the 'nose gear arm' is pulled in against the firewall, you should be getting a left turn. When the pushrod is out (about 3/8") you should be getting a right turn. Dan (AMA 605992) is right! At the servo end, the pushrod should be in a hole closer to the center of the servo. This will result in very little turning of the nose wheel, otherwise the plane will be squirrelly going down the runway. The combination of the nose wheel and air passing by the rudder will turn and correct the plane until take-off. The nose wheel is not meant to make drastic turns.
You'll have fun with this plane when you get it flying.
Good Luck! ________________________________ Earl AMA #40329
Reply to
Earl Scherzinger
to be too far to the
basically facing
on it, so the steering
guide tube, enlarge the
Epoxy would just
until some stick time
had not thought of it.
No problem. I'll just suggest why *IMHO* taildraggers have advantages over trikes on grass. Take-off on grass the nosewheel tends to add extra drag and some nose-down impetus. The nosegear takes a lot of stress. On heavy landings the nosegear often gets bent (or breaks of the engine mount/firewall). Nosegear steering puts more strain on the rudder servo. The shorter distance between main gear and nosewheel compared to distance between maingear and a tailwheel accentuates bumps. Trike is more draggy in the air. It's a bit more expensive.
Only advantage I can think of is that it might give a tad more protection to the engine.
Reply to
markzoom

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