OT Aircraft engine to push an in-line skater?

In context... What sort of air-thrust (propeller or jet) engine
would be required to push 160 pounds along the ground on low
friction wheels? Or is a conventional motor pushing a wheel
against the ground unquestionably better?
If you have any links to relevant information on similar attempts,
they would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks.
Reply to
John Doe
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On 21 Jul 2010 20:36:48 GMT, John Doe wrote in :
You're much safer with a geared transmission than with a prop spinning near your shins.
Having said that, one of the first pictures to come up is of a prop inside a cage:
I was going to suggest a 50cc two-stroke. Looks like that is about what others are doing, too.
Depends on how fast you want to go and how much hill climbing you have to do.
Marty
Reply to
Martin X. Moleski, SJ
Gack!
I searched for motor-powered skateboards.
A search for gas powered roller skates nets this:
Which seems to be one of these:
Which got banned in Britain:
They're using a smaller engine--understandably!
Marty
Reply to
Martin X. Moleski, SJ
Yeah, the only thing I found for in-line skates, when looking for an alternate method of propulsion, is motorized skates. That will never fly. You cannot attach anything heavy to a skate or your lower leg, without destroying the main purpose/quality of skating. Personally, I do street skating. I am currently using a push stick with an electric motor. I do like it, and probably very much so after my ankles adjust, but there is always better.
I actually started research for the propeller/jet thing... And I realized that the criteria/keyword should just be "bicycle" instead of "skate". Found a boatload of examples on YouTube. Pushing a bicycle is very nearly the same, and the adaptation is easy. One benefit of a skate over a bicycle is much less weight, depending on how much the backpack frame weighs, but probably just aluminum.
Not sure if I am going to make one, just depends on how feasible it looks, how much propulsion it can provide. Speed is a non-concern, getting me up slight inclines is the issue (especially on extremely narrow sidewalks).
Reply to
John Doe
On 22 Jul 2010 02:27:49 GMT, John Doe wrote in :
I seem to remember seeing some kind of backpack-to-wheel wire transmission. The flexible drive shaft was in a housing of some kind and must have run to a worm gear on the drive wheel. While that gets the weight away from the ankles, it leaves you with a power-robbing driveshaft that would seem vulnerable to kinking if you're not careful when donning and doffing the skates.
Marty
Reply to
Martin X. Moleski, SJ
| In context... What sort of air-thrust (propeller or jet) engine | would be required to push 160 pounds along the ground on low | friction wheels? Or is a conventional motor pushing a wheel | against the ground unquestionably better?
Powering the wheel is unquestionably better.
You could do this with a R/C plane engine if you wanted -- even a moderately sized one (0.46 ci or so) could produce more power than the rider could -- but do be sure it gets lots of airflow, as airplane engines are designed to work with lots of airflow to stay cool. R/C car engines have bigger heat sinks and such and so handle less airflow.
Running it somewhat rich to keep the heat down would also be wise.
Reply to
Doug McLaren

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