3 phase power system

why we take 1.732 phase factor for calculating power in 3 phase system?

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link_harji expressed precisely :

Root 3 3 phase 120 degrees Go back to your text book and you will find the relationship of these.
It always comes out 1.732
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In article

because 1.732 root three
Approximate Bill
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link_harji wrote:

There are two basic ways to connect 3 phase loads. Delta and Y In either the applied line voltages are 120 degrees apart In the delta the line voltages are the same as the phase voltages as the loads are connected line to line In the Y, the loads are connected line to neutral so that the phase voltage is line voltage/root(3) or line voltage/1.732 In the Y the phase current is the same as the line current but in the delta it is line current/1.732 The total power in a resistive load is 3 times the power per phase that is P=3Vphase*Iphase =(3/root(3))*Vline*Iline =1.732Vline* Iline in either case Work it out or look up references on 3 phase.
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