Power Factor Correction

Hello, everyone and if I may be permitted to revisit my question from a while back for which there was only speculation in the responses: On
medium-voltage (say up to 69 kV) distribution lines, what tools do AC power systems engineers use to establish/estimate the optimum location for banks of shunt-connected capacitors? I'm thinking of software programs but also how this might also have been accomplished perhaps via handbook tables, nomographs or other means without the benefit of computers. Sincerely,
--
J. B. Wood e-mail: arl snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Still speculative, but I would assume the electrical company knows what equipment they have and how much reactive power it consumes, and would base it on that. Large customers likely have meters which measure reactive power and they would account for that. Otherwise they could measure how much the current lags the voltage at a point and compensate if needed.
(amusingly, I noticed a very old rural distribution circuit, delta connected single phase (so two conductors on pole) probably 4800 volts, which had what looked like a tiny capacitor. One small rectangular box with two leads. I didn't think they even bothered when the downstream load was a couple dozen houses/farms. It appeared the fuses/cutouts were disconnected so it was no longer in use)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/20/2020 10:34 PM, Michael Moroney wrote:

Thanks for taking the time to reply. I've got one of the "bible" EE handbooks, McGraw-Hill's "Standard Handbook for Electrical Engineers" that has extensive info on AC power distribution components (distribution transformers, oil/air circuit breakers, reclosers, cutouts, PF correction capacitors) but doesn't discuss methods for determining capacitor bank optimum location along a distribution line.
Also, my online searches revealed no equipment that can directly measure power factor or current lag at an arbitrary location along an MV distribution line. Would be kind of dangerous I would think. Sincerely,
--
J. B. Wood e-mail: arl snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 23/11/2020 18:42, J.B. Wood wrote:



Doing a google for "waveform analyzer power factor" shows "power quality" test equipment on offer.
Dunno LV/MV though, but perhaps there is stuff that can be gleamed from reading their operations manuals?
--
Adrian C

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, 24 November 2020 at 08:47:06 UTC-5, Adrian Caspersz wrote:

I?m thinking about my $25 E, H signal level meter but it?s only 10kHz to 3GHz and measures in V/m and uT/m
Using a dipole antenna loaded with an LC filter tuned to swamp any RF abov e 10kHz and a large loop antenna with the same, I think it?s possib le to measure power factor remotely then aggregate the field measurements t o compare with the power studies to determine which load networks will bene fit from a low Q Cap loading on a transmission line modelled on Falstad? ??s with a delay line network simulation.
AC motors usually draw a bit more than 5 times the rated load current on st art up which when unloaded means it?s about 50 times with zero load , so effectively it?s 98% VAR, or 2% of then determine the cyclica l nature of motor work during the day and the distribution of loads from st eady, variable , start-stop, arc welding , old fashioned HPS street lamps a nd determine which of loads will save on maintenance costs with some sort o f threshold model.
The best tools are the one you know how to use and you will wish you knew M B Hydro?s PSTools (?). It I know Falstad?s web simulator re ally well is capable of good simulations on transmission lines in time or s pectral domain.
Anyways if there was a PO, I could design my idea for a non-contact EH PF t ester.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, 25 November 2020 at 08:48:01 UTC-5, Anthony Stewart wrote:

s only 10kHz to 3GHz and measures in V/m and uT/m

ve 10kHz and a large loop antenna with the same, I think it?s possi ble to measure power factor remotely then aggregate the field measurements to compare with the power studies to determine which load networks will ben efit from a low Q Cap loading on a transmission line modelled on Falstad? ??s with a delay line network simulation.

start up which when unloaded means it?s about 50 times with zero lo ad , so effectively it?s 98% VAR, or 2% of then determine the cycli cal nature of motor work during the day and the distribution of loads from steady, variable , start-stop, arc welding , old fashioned HPS street lamps and determine which of loads will save on maintenance costs with some sort of threshold model.

MB Hydro?s PSTools (?). It I know Falstad?s web simulator really well is capable of good simulations on transmission lines in time or spectral domain.

tester.
Brain fart on the motor?s PF from startup to no load to full load , that?s just the real power change , anyways a portable DSO in XY m ode for HE fields , calibrated ought to measure the average 3 phase imbalan ce which may be accurate enuf to estimate the sum with a near field non con tact set of measurements, measured in three 1km spacing where the phases ro tate.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.