The rotor shaft is loose as a goose.

I have this induction motor, the rotor shaft is attached to the rotor core with an interference fit, the shaft is cooled and the core is
heated and then they are pressed together. My problem is that this fit sucks and the shaft is rotating freely inside the core.
Does anybody know of any nationally recognized companies that specialize in making/fixing rotors.
Thanks in advance.
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Strange - usually there is a key/keyway involved.
Any GOOD motor shop should be able to repair it, but having a new rotor made, except by the OEM, is probably out of the question.
Where are you located? What are the details of the motor? Size, RPM, etc.

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wrote:

I'm in Ontario Canada, the motor is kind of unusual I think. It's a two-phase squirrel cage induction motor. One phase is a ref. phase and the other is control. The rotor is only 3 " long by 2 " round. I'm going to go back to the manufacture and get them build some new ones that don't come loose. Thanks for the help everybody - the loctite idea was used and may have worked. However I need something that meets the original design. That's why I can put it in a vice and squeeze the crap out of it.
Thanks again.
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I'm in Ontario Canada, the motor is kind of unusual I think. It's a two-phase squirrel cage induction motor. One phase is a ref. phase and the other is control. The rotor is only 3 " long by 2 " round. I'm going to go back to the manufacture and get them build some new ones that don't come loose. Thanks for the help everybody - the loctite idea was used and may have worked. However I need something that meets the original design. That's why I can put it in a vice and squeeze the crap out of it.
Thanks again.
Ahhh, a tiny motor. I was thinking more along the lines of a standard industrial motor.
What is it for, some type of instrumentation application? The two phase thing was extremely popular with chart recorder manufacturers 40 years ago, and I am curious to know what niche that design would fill today.
Thanks in advance.
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wrote:

Lets just say it's really old (50 years) technology.
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----------- It's a servo motor-- used in control systems for positioning. Steppers now do the job. It is probably cheaper and better to simply go to a stepper motor.
--

Don Kelly snipped-for-privacy@shawcross.ca
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Try some Loctite or epoxy the thing together.
spokes wrote:

--
Joe Leikhim K4SAT
"The RFI-EMI-GUY"
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Easy. I've done this with similar problems. Remove the shaft. Place the part of it that fits into the rotor into a vise. Squeeze it just a bit to make it slightly oval. Then press it back into the rotor. Be careful you don't bend the shaft or unbalance it.
Al
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