anyone have experience using masterkeypro2006 ?

i just came accross it and need a masterkey program, wondering what was out
there that people are happy with other than the very expensive promaster ?
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Hello, I use HPC'S MasterKing and find it very user friendle and very accurate. John Middleman,CRL chris wrote: > i just came accross it and need a masterkey program, wondering what was out > there that people are happy with other than the very expensive promaster ? >
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Reply to
pickproof
I got to work on a MK system designed by another fellow with a program. I met the fellow once, and he was so pleased with his computer program. He set up a system for a motel with about 10 units, and every chamber had a master wafer. I mentioned MK two or three chambers (before I knew much about hold and vary). He kept saying "that's how it came off the computer".
I finally walked away from one job. The cylinders were drilled with deepest 6-depth. The MK system went down to 9. The lockies on this board will know what goes wrong when your cylinders go down to 6 and your MK system goes down to 9.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
agree wit Roger news: snipped-for-privacy@news01.syix.com but, we also use "HPC'S MasterKing" and check the results before applying the system.
g'luck
Reply to
Key
Out of interest, what is the minimum number of master wafers that should be used. One wafer would suffice for a 10 unit motel, even with 5 pin cylinders, but I would feel happier using at least two, and to try and avoid any change keys differing on one pin only, or if it does the difference is more than 2.
Reply to
peterwn
That's an interesting technical question. I could make a 10 change MK system with one master wafer. Dunno, never gave that a lot of thought. You'd want to make it less likely for tenants to jiggle keys to work.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
I have never heard of any defined minimum number, but remember that the more master pins you put in, the more possible shearlines you create. I set up a two-level system a few years ago-18 units with one master.Most had only 2 or three master pins in them at the most, and I trashed the ones that used #1 pins-get jammed too easy or wear too quick.Kept the diffs up to 2 steps.
goma.
Reply to
goma865
Two works, in many cases. I did a MK in a factory where someone had filed and ground the plugs. I ended up making a 4-step, and even then I could jiggle a couple of the keys to get em to work in different doors. I hope they never find out.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
"Stormin Mormon" <cayoung61-&spamblock*-@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:45933a7c$1$16947$ snipped-for-privacy@roadrunner.com...
if that would be the case ? for us to do the job, they would have had to replace the plugs or call someone else.
my2¢
Reply to
Key
So it is in effect a trade-off between the risk of jiggling (especially in a small suite such as a mom and pop motel) and minimisation of shear-lines. Seems like at least 2 master wafers minimum should be used.
Unlike planning a masterkey system by the numbers, where everything is 'black and white', I would agree that there are no definitive answers to queries such as the minimum number of master wafers, whether to use two or three level steps etc.
It would seem that in a large GMK system, the probability of someone finding that one change key could jiggle another lock would be slight, although it would be problematical if one SMK was known to be capable of jiggling locks under a different SMK. Hence if softwarei used to generate a GMK system, then the SMK combinations should be carefully checked, and if need be set by hand (assuming the software allows this). It is apparent that for a very small system, software could well generate a rather inapt system with a very high risk of users finding that ome key can 'jiggle' other locks, and Murphy's Law will decree that the lock on the most 'sensitive' door is the one most prone to jiggling.
Reply to
peterwn
"Stormin Mormon" <cayoung61-&spamblock*-@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:459382e0$0$16964$ snipped-for-privacy@roadrunner.com...
doesn't matter if they only wanted one. it shouldn't have cost them much to replace the bad cylinders so the job could be done correctly. if you could, as you stated, "jiggle a couple of the keys to get em to work in different doors " because of filed plugs ? the cylinders needed to be replaced.
my2¢
Reply to
Key
local car dealer called-their 'security' personnel, made a goof up, and wanted me to bid on rekeying the entire place.. a Y4 key.. I bid it high JUST BECAUSE I already seen the situation within some of the plugs.. pins UPSIDE DOWN??? right..
--Shiva--
Reply to
me
might not be that bad... I'd start off using the correct Yale key not the gmk version bypassing any sectional keyway... that'll at least take away any sloppiness to the key. and + it's a stronger blank then the y4. Roger
Reply to
Roger Cann
whats REALLY funny is the original shop that did this has been in business, almost 60 years now, too
--Shiva--
Reply to
me
not a SFIC, or high security.. $7.50 to 10 seems to be the norm, per keyhole, plus trip lumber yards charging $5 when you bring them in.
--Shiva--
Reply to
me
Not in Stormy's world. In Stormy's world no matter how simple a solution exists the correct course of action is to butcher the job to the absolute highest degree possible and then "hope they never find out". Who cares if it's actually easier and more profitable to do it the right way? Not Chris. It's more fun to F it up and "hope they never find out". Afterall they aren't his locks, or air conditioners, or refrigerators, or furnaces (what's a little CO poisoning it gives you that nice pink glow) and he really doesn't know what the hell he is doing anyway. They want a masterkey system? Who cares if just about every key in the system ghosts to something it shouldn't with a little wiggling as long as "they never find out"? A POS like Chris could care less if he actually does the job he scammed somebody into thinking he would. Actually he prefers not to. It's more fun that way. Maybe it's time for somebody to start forwarding his posts to the local authorities where he lives so they can find a way to run him out of business. You do have a sales tax ID and all that stuff right Chris? Right?
Reply to
Steve
care, "Stormin Mormon" <cayoung61-&spamblock*-@hotmail.com> wrote
God you are a worthless piece of crap. You could have told them they had a problem and sold them new cylinders making yourself $ and solving their problem, instead you did your usual halfass routine and left things a mess. You probably F'ed up the plugs in the first place. I can just picture you grinding away on them with the coarsest grinding wheel you could find. Then giving them a couple smacks with a claw hammer for good measure. I hope when they find out it's after a major theft or other occurence and they sue you and take everything you have, what little that is.
PS Where is it again in that book of Mormon of yours where it commands you to screw people over and "hope they never find out"?
Reply to
Steve

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