freezer temp swing

Had a bad moment a couple of nights ago when our small chest freezer
malfunctioned . It's down in the cellar and doesn't get checked often so
we don't really know how long it was offline . A lot of stuff partly
thawed but we managed to save most of it . Thing is , after I unplugged
then replugged the unit and rotated the temp control it came back on and
is cooling . My question is what is considered a normal range of temp
change ? Without touching any controls or even opening the lid it's been
varying from -20°F to +5°F . It's mostly empty so I know that will have
an effect , but 25° seems a bit of a wide variation .
(also posted to alt.home.repair)
Reply to
Snag
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Our upright freezer rarely varies my more than a couple degrees, maybe 5-10 when its been opened for a few minutes organizing or searching for something. Maybe only a couple when its closed. A chest freezer should be much more stable as the cold air doesn't "pour" out.
A "trick" to know how long a freezer has been out is to put a glass of water in and let it freeze, then lay a dime on top of the ice. The ice will sublime away over time, but if its water or the dime is sunk in the ice you know it melted. The glass of water needs to be replaced from time to time because of the sublimation (that's my best guess as to water loss) over time.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
Yeah , I was hoping but it looks like maybe the temp control is going TU . I guess I'll see if it's going to be cost effective to replace it . It's not a crucial part of our storage , but it sure is convenient to have it . Can't complain , it was gifted to us from our son after he got an upright unit .
Reply to
Snag
Our chest freezer gave up aout six years ago and SWMBO specified an upright more conveniently located and more convenient item retrieval. Residen IT geek came up with a monitoring system for both the freezer and the adjacent "daddy pop" fridge. the mostly full freezer runs about a 150 minute cycle between -19.5 and -11.5 with an average of -15.1 deg. C. while the fridge cycle is 60 minutes and 5.6 to8.6 deg.
Reply to
Gerry
We do have an upright freezer ... and I'll be monitoring this one for at least a couple of weeks . If it doesn't malf again in a couple of weeks I'll start putting stuff like bread and other less expensive stuff in it . Meat is way too expensive to trust in that unit just yet , maybe after a couple of months I might trust it again . I will be looking for one of those alarms another respondent mentioned .
Reply to
Snag
...My question is what is considered a normal range of temp change ?
------------------------
My Magic Chef compact refrigerator has a differential of about 10 F degrees , which I first measured and then confirmed from their tech support. A mechanical bimetallic thermostat needs a temperature differential to power the snap action that inhibits contact arcing.
I measured it with a thermocouple passing under the door gasket, with an inexpensive Ecowitt data logger, and with an Oregon Scientific remote that communicates with the base station through the door, or the gap around it.
My 12V Alpicool freezers have electronic thermostats with adjustable differentials. I have them in the kitchen area where I can watch them because they aren't completely reliable, though they haven't thawed any food yet.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I just ordered a temp alarm unit . Has 3 temps displayed , 2 from sensors and one ambient . If the transmitter range is long enough I'll put one out in the freezer in my shop area in addition to the one down in the cellar . Guess I better order some more AAA rechargeable batteries too .
Reply to
Snag
I just ordered a temp alarm unit . Has 3 temps displayed , 2 from sensors and one ambient . If the transmitter range is long enough I'll put one out in the freezer in my shop area in addition to the one down in the cellar . Guess I better order some more AAA rechargeable batteries too .
I would use Lithiums in the frozen space remotes. They last for years in my outdoor remotes. Rechargeables generally have less capacity and you might not notice when they go dead, unless that causes an alarm. Compare the operating temperature ranges:
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Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I wish I'd seen this before I ordered ... looks like I'll be ordering some lithiums , I was concerned about the low temp limits of NiMH batteries .
Reply to
Snag
Agreed abut using Lithium (or at least alkaline).
The rechargables put out lower voltage which (as I've bumped into with my own remote thermometers..) can cause some grief. Plus they've (the rechargables..) have shorter lifespans.
Reply to
danny burstein
I've had Energizer lithium AA in my remote weather station (Accurite) for nearly 3 years without changing them, About two years ago I stocked up on replacements from Costco (20 for $19.95) and have only used two of them in a different application.
Reply to
Gerry
<snip>
I started buying Energizer Lithiums hoping to avoid damage from leakage in my devices. Recently noticed at my local store that the price has more than doubled since a year ago when I last bought some :(
Reply to
Leon Fisk
One thing to be aware of is that when these lithium cells run down, their open-circuit voltage may hold up, while their ability to deliver current when needed may be greatly reduced.
This happened to me with an Ohaus tabletop lab scale. After 3 or 4 years of intermittent but daily use, the scale would suddenly just shut down, without any message or warning. The low-battery indicator never came on.
Knowing how long those AA batteries had been in service, I guessed that they were now exhausted. Bingo. New batteries solved the problem.
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Joe Gwinn
On Sun, 13 Nov 2022 10:55:43 -0500, "Jim Wilkins" snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote as underneath :
snip
Thanks, interesting chart but I gave up with Alkalines they used to last for years but nowdays, really they all seem to leak even with plenty of capacity left. I heard somewhere that the ban on Mercury has made a significant difference to this problem but that could be rubbish! Three years seems to me to be the danger point but no real tests of course!
Reply to
Charlie+
In the 1990's I bought Rayovac Renewal rechargeable alkalines, mostly AAs. A full discharge damaged them but in applications where they were recharged after brief use, like the TP4000ZC DVMs for my data logging system, they are still good nearly 30 years later.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
You lucked out. We tried them in a dozen pagers (remember those???) and while they didn't leak, they just about universally died out after just a couple of recharges.
Reply to
danny burstein
You lucked out. We tried them in a dozen pagers (remember those???) and while they didn't leak, they just about universally died out after just a couple of recharges.
[to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]
------------------ How many readers understand crypto jokes?
Deeper cycling in TV and VCR remotes destroyed my Renewals too.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins

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