How to repair cracked / broken cast iron parts ?

Morning-
Picked up an old grape crusher and just noticed it was broken. I was more interested in the 18" wine press, to be honest, but I'd like to
get this working.
Photos of the offending crack are here at
http://www.gotSheep.com/Wine/CRW_3475_sm.jpg (300kb)
http://www.gotSheep.com/Wine/CRW_3479_sm.jpg (316kb)
The part on the left is spring loaded to allow the crusher rollers to part should something get in that shouldn't be there- such as a rock or large branch.
I was contemplating drilling two holes, tapping them, and then screwing a tie plate across them to hold it together.
My neighbor suggested a talented welder could do it- when he looked at the part he whistled and ammended his suggested with 'a very, very talented welder'.
The last possibility is to break the entire part down and get a new one machined out of stainless steel, but that would take the longest and probably be cost prohibitive.
Suggestions?
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Looks like a very easy fix with cold weld Ni-cad arc welding rods... Welding something thats broke all the way off like your problem is very easy... Ar you close to Pennsylvania ??? I weld cast every day... I could make it look like it was never welded execpt for a color change... Fixing cast that is only cracked part way is a lot harder to fix...
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Had a Deere Van Brundt seed drill that brokea cast iron gear and 2 mounting brakets. Bought a barbeque grill, and some of the high nickel arc welding rod. Heated up the barbeque with charcvoal and about 3 psi of air. Gotthe parts just barely red and welded. Worked great, except contouring the gear teeth took about 2 days. I havent broken anything on it since then (4 or 5 years), so I assume it's pretty strong.

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Do you have any idea (order of magnitude) that sort of job would cost?
I'm in Rochester NY- Depending on where in PA it could be a day trip with lots of homemade wine....
I'm trying to source some more grapes- I like this crusher idea they have here but apparently its more common to use rubber rollers- but like I said, the wine press was the big winner- weighs in around 120lbs and a HUGE basket.
Another side- any easy way of drilling out iron rivets? I'd like to replace the wood staves in the basket press without dinging up the iron with a grinder. I thought abount using a dremel and Xing each rivet to keep the drill bit centered, but that still sounds like alot of work....
Thanks much
Jason snipped-for-privacy@lockhavenonline.com wrote:

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How about using an automatic center punch and then drilling the rivet? That's what I've alway done. Karl
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@lockhavenonline.com wrote:

The color problem we used to deal with by spraying the completed job with cast-iron colored spray paint. I forget where we bought the stuff, but it must have been a clear with powdered iron it it. Looked exactly like grey cast when dry, and if the weld was smoothly cleaned off it would completely hide it. The repairs were good, and were legitimate. It just saved much time answering questions.
Dan
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On 23 Sep 2006 04:50:43 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I think a competent weldor would have no problem welding or brazing that job. Since it already broke there and since cosmetics probably aren't a factor, I'd probably braze it along with some reinforcing steel bits in the stress concentration zone.
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At least the crack is fresh, not full of rust. Unsure if it's cast iron, or die cast. [ Hard or Soft ? ] Cast Iron can be repaired by preheating + TIG Welding Some welders use a ' cold ' process, where a small dot of cast iron rod is added, allowed to cool, than another dot, etc. until crack is filled. Why did casting break, did it get banged in transit or before sale, or did it get ' WartHogged " by some crank spinning teenager ? Knowing how much force the casting holds would help. If it got clobbered, formed sheet metal gussets could be riveted to hold unit together, if it broke from ' normal ' use, you need a tougher part.
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Honestly, no idea. It was probably broken before purchase- there's a subtle sheen of rust on the inside of the crack suggestive of long term exposure to moisture.
The device itself was not used for 25 years- and it probab was a weak part. There is a screw tensioner that is leveraged off of this piece- my guess is that a rock went into the rollers and jammed them- with a motor spinning them at 600 RPM it very easily could have sheared the part off.
If I could find someone with a smelter I could cast a duplicate out of aluminum quick enough and then just bore out the carriage bolt holes- but I'd like a semi-permanent fix- just long enough for this season's grape crush before I start investigation into a new crusher.
I'm asking around work to see if anyone has the skill set to TIG weld it back in place...
Thanks Paul-
Jason
Paul wrote:

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