I-Beams T-Beams and cutting?

Hi does anyone know of a site online where you can price/buy I or
beams?
Can you get 150mm I-Beams or T-Beams?
I am really looking for a T-Beams 150-180 mm 3300mm Long!
I can't find any T-Beams what would be the best way to cut the top o
an I-Beam to make it into a T-Beam, I am a bit scared to say the leas
about cutting it down with an angle grinder!
Do companies such as Travis Perkins stock I or T beams because the
don't have them online?
Thank
--
andymason79
Reply to
andymason79
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T sections are available, but I doubt you will get them from Travis Perkins. I would call all the steel suppliers in the Yellow Pages or Business Pages and tell them what you want. Even if you spend hours looking it will be easier than trying to cut one flange off an I-beam, and cheaper too. You might get through 100 abrasive discs trying to do that to a few beams. An oxyacetylene torch would be easier, but still hard work and not very neat (unless you are a real pro).
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
Since you are talking metric sizes, you are probably on the continent. In the US those would be 6" to 9" a bit over 10' long, a VERY standard size in the construction industry. As some else mentioned, check with the steel suppliers but with special attention to those that service the construction trades. You should be able to get someone to cut to length, hit is with a coat of red primer, and deliver it to the job site for quite nominal costs. (Perhaps double the going price of prime steel per pound, cutting and delivery included.)
'T' beams are going to be an tough one. I'd just have the supplier cut the flange off as part of the deal. It's not big deal even with a hand torch. Just set the beam on the stands with the flange up, set the torch head on the lower flange for a guide, and GO. Should take 4 to 6 minutes. clean up with a grinder.
I might point out that you are calling the beam an 'I' shape. An actual 'I' shape has tapered flanges, is pretty close to obsolete although still usually available in some sizes. All modern rolled stock is 'M' or 'W' shapes that have flanges of uniform thickness. Just different rolling mill tools.
andymas> Hi does anyone know of a site online where you can price/buy I or T > beams?
Reply to
RoyJ
I think that's the only way to get a Tee bar. The structural tees in the AISC Steel Construction Manual are described as "Cut from W shapes."
Ned Simmons
Reply to
Ned Simmons
Tees were a section written into some British Standards many years ago, but how widely available they are today I don't know. I haven't seen them bigger than about 3" either. But search hard enough and I'd guess you can find them...
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
Normally your 150 Tee would be split from a 300 mm wide flange beam. You can split the beam in two with a torch but use a flat bar guide. Pierce 20 mm in from one end and cut no more than a metre before skipping 20 mm, piercing and continuing on. Let the unit cool then finish by cutting the still joined locations. The beam will still need straightening on a hydraulic press of some sort. I would suggest that you could simply use a 150 mm wide flange beam. We switch back and forth between metric and inch all the time in Canada. You will find six inch beams quite common. If you are not up to splitting into tees some suppliers will split beams for an extra charge. Randy
Hi does anyone know of a site online where you can price/buy I or T beams?
Can you get 150mm I-Beams or T-Beams?
I am really looking for a T-Beams 150-180 mm 3300mm Long!
I can't find any T-Beams what would be the best way to cut the top of an I-Beam to make it into a T-Beam, I am a bit scared to say the least about cutting it down with an angle grinder!
Do companies such as Travis Perkins stock I or T beams because they don't have them online?
Thanks
-- andymason79
Reply to
R. Zimmerman
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You'll have to create an account to get pricing.
An 8m length of 152mm I section qould be around 120 quid plus vat and delivery.
snip
Reply to
scruttocks
Look at
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(formerly British Steel), they lis all types of steel sections etc and give all relevant spec. Whether you can get hold of them is another question of cours
-- Nick H
Reply to
Nick H

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