MAXX Chain saw grinder vs Oregon 511A

I posted this in the woodworking group and there was no reply.
By reading the ads one would believe that the MAXX is a better grinder,
and maybe it is. I was thinking of the setup between right and left
cutter grinding and how many resettings you have to do in the course of
sharpening a chain. I have used the standard oregon type, and they
will make a good sharp chain, with only one adjustment for RH and LH.
Any comments from you experts? What about that hydraulic clamp? Well
made or something else to break on the day after warrenty expires?
Bob
Reply to
rleonard
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I have not used this grinder but it looks very close to my Windsor grinder . You do not need extra setups on mine . Set the angle for one side , do all the teeth facing that way . Reset and do the opposite side with the grinder running in the opposite rotation . At least on mine that is a flip of the switch . I honestly don't bother with it . I did at one time help some competition guys run tests on angles but for my own use I hand sharpen in the field as needed . Here is what I have .
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Luck Ken Cutt
Reply to
Ken Cutt
Thanks Ken, Reversable motors are no longer available. Here is the MAAX grinder;
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and here is the other unit
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Bob
Reply to
rleonard
As an aside to this question ..........
I have two dull chains already for my chainsaw. I bought a Craftsman file sharpening jig that clamps on top of the bar.
I am considering making a stand from an old rim so I don't have to work with this in my lap, and to be able to disassemble the saw, work on it, clean it, etc.
Has anyone here ever made a stand, or do you just sit it up on the work bench? I know for blowing the crud out of it and washing it off, I'd like to take it outside in the dirt rather than on my shop floor.
Suggestions appreciated.
Steve
Reply to
Steve B
When I was a little boy, we cut about 1 cord of wood per week to heat our home.
Dad did all the maintance on the saw in the field. He took a large log, cut into it almost the depth of the bar, and let the saw hang.
Reply to
Dave Lyon
So... use it, have two sharp chains, and go cut some wood.
Your lap? Sheesh.
Perhaps you've over-complicated just a wee tad.
You have a chainsaw. Thus, you presumably have logs. Set it on top of one. If you are actually tearing it apart, a workbench that does not mind getting oily is useful. Once you've torn it apart enough to get any sawdust, etc that's not easily removable with the saw assembled off, you can easily enough walk out the door with the part full of guck and an air hose - or you can avoid blowing dirty guck in places you'll regret it later by simply scraping it off with a stick, into the trash. In either case, any sort of saw stand will rather rapidly be left holding some irrelevant part of the saw (there just are not that many parts to grab, and when you take the saw apart, not much is left attached to any of them.) Furthermore, moving a stand outside is going to be a lot more bother than carrying the entire saw, or any part of the saw...
If you are sharpening it, the top of a log, or the tailgate of a pickup both work fine. Same also works fine for normal maintenance such as swapping chains and bars. It's a not-very-complicated tool for cutting wood, and does not require a huge support apparatus for daily operations.
Reply to
Ecnerwal
That's fine, but unless you're extremely proficient at sharpening saws (which most aren't) take your chains in to be professionally sharpened when they start cutting crooked. Don't forget to file the rakers as needed. A good saw shop quality sharpening grinder is going to cost some money, don't be fooled by the cheap knock-offs, they're a waste of time and money.
Folks who make a living with chainsaws do all of the needed maintenance out in the woods. If you're too far from your PU tailgate, just do it on a log.
Run a tank of fuel through it, remove the air filter and clean it and the built up gunk inside of the case/cover. Refill with fuel and bar oil. Adjust the chain tension. Touch up the chain with a file as needed, repeat as necessary. Total down time ~5 min between tankfulls. Install an extra, pre-sharpened chain as needed.
After the days work is done, do a final cleaning, and top off the fluids. Resharpen your chains when you get back home for the next days work. I've always got 1/2 a dozen freshly sharpened chains at the ready. Filing them correctly is an art, one loggers take seriously. You don't need a fancy stand.
Reply to
nobody
My uncle was logger in the woods of NH, since retired. His saw sharpenning stand was a maybe 2' long log, cut to about a 1' square.
He hollowed the center to make it lighter, so that it looked like 2 solid ends held apart by 4 maybe 2x2 or 3x3 corner posts. One of the sections he cut out of the middle was cleaned up and also hollowed out (maybe 15" tall?) but with only two posts, to be used a stool, and was stored back inside. Threw the whole thing in the chain tray of the truck.
Might be a little awkward for what you want, but for him, the materials were what was at hand. I know he also used stumps when away from the truck.
My personal take on it is anything that will put it at a more comfortable height for you is probably a good idea. --Glenn Lyford
Reply to
glyford
Clamp the middle of the bar in a regular vice , so the chain will still rotate . Sharpen away . Hand sharpening is really not that hard , I have taught hundreds of people to do it . Just keep the angles and teeth length as even as you can . Make sure on chisel tooth chain the tip is needle sharp with no shiny spot end on . Get a guide to keep the depth gages ( about a buck ) at the right height . File them about every third sharpening . Use a file the next size smaller when the chain has worn down to about the last third . Always wear leather gloves while sharpening , I have seen some really deep cuts from a minor slip . No need to look at this as complicated , it isn't . Compared to the stuff people here do , learning to sharpen a chain will be a piece of cake . Luck Ken Cutt
Reply to
Ken Cutt
wrote: (clip) don't be fooled by the cheap knock-offs, they're a waste of time and money. (clip) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ The one I bought (Nick the Grinder) on sale at Harbor Freight works just fine. Two of my friends borrowed it, and each ended up buying them also. BTW, HF has a house brand version of Nick the Grinder on sale right now--with the 20% extra discount coupon, it's only $40.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman

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