Need a gear , older Enco lathe

OK guys, help me find a gear for my lathe. Enco 1024 Enco is no help.
Suggestions welcome.
Rex B
-------- Original Message --------
Subject: RE: part inquiry Enco lathe
Rex: Unfortunatly I have no information on your lathe except that it is not interchangable with the #110-2034. That lathe was discontinued several years ago. Sorry I couldn't help you. Glenn X6220
-----Original Message----- From: Rex Burkheimer [mailto: snipped-for-privacy@txol.net] To: Enco Customer Service Subject: part inquiry Enco lathe
Model 1024 Lathe, built 1986 I need a compound gear in the quick change gearbox. This is a 16/32 tooth gear, with a bronze bushing bore of approx 19/32 I do not have a manual, so am using the 110-2034 manual as a reference. The construction is similar, perhaps the gears are common to my lathe. In that manual, the part is #45, part number is 3D-2
Can you supply this part?
--
Rex Burkheimer
Marketing Director, WM Automotive Warehouse
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    [ ... ]

    First off -- you need more information in your article, as I suggested to the previous request.
    Your 19/32" is almost certainly 15.00 mm instead, and we need other information such as the OD (from which the pitch diameter can probably be determined), and it possible the detailed tooth form.
    Your dimensions should be in metric units, as this machine was manufactured in a metric country, and all imperial units (such as you r 19/32") will have to be converted to metric before anything meaningful can be calculated.
    You might also include the tooth width to give those who have metric gear catalogs a chance of finding matching gears to use, even if you are planning to bore out an existing good gear, and turn down the broken one for a press fit.
    If you have a milling machine and a dividing head, you can probably turn a ring of similar metal, press fit it, and cut new gear teeth.
    People have also been known to weld or braze material into the broken tooth area and to cut new teeth after setting the index head from the remaining teeth.
    Good Luck,         DoN.
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DoN. Nichols wrote:

Don, I agree, but I was at home, and all my measuring tools and charts ar at the shop. I was really hoping someone might have a spare one laying around.

I have both, but don't feel up to that task, unless as a last resort. I have used the milling machine hardly at all, and the indexer not at all.

All the teeth are distorted on this one.
I will get more precise measurements and try to figure it out from the Boston Gear catalog.
Thanks for the input.
Rex
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    [ ... ]

    Well ... since there were apparently several versions of this made, I think that you'll need the more precise measurements anyway so someone can know whether what they have is right or not.
    [ ... ]

    Ouch! This means that you will have to check the module shape and the pressure angle on the gear which meshes with it, as everything is too distorted to work from.

    You're welcome.
    Good Luck,         DoN.
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Actually, the gear right next to it is perfect, and identical. So I have a great pattern.
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I would look for a stock gear that you can cut down or boar out to get the job gone.
Try : http://www.martinsprocket.com /
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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Roger Shoaf wrote:

Those South Bends, Logans and Clausings are looking better now aren't they. You can still buy these parts both new and used for the American iron and the Chineese iron is unobtainium. As a general rule, it seems, that spares become nonexistent when the machines go out of production. Not really logical given that few machines require parts until they begin to show signs of age.
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On 28 Jun 2005 19:15:44 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@AOL.COM wrote:

Indeed! Another reason to hunt for American iron.
Gunner
"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire. Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us) off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give them self determination under "play nice" rules.
Think of it as having your older brother knock the shit out of you for torturing the cat." Gunner
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Hey, I like the challenge of repairing the difficult. And I have a Logan lathe to do it with :P
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Wed, 29 Jun 2005 11:18:44 GMT in rec.crafts.metalworking :

    Maybe people ought to consider making the spare parts before the machine breaks and they can't make those parts. You can do it in your "spare time". From the spare steel you just happen to have laying about.

yeah.
--
pyotr filipivich.
as an explaination for the decline in the US's tech edge, James
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On Fri, 01 Jul 2005 10:07:57 GMT, pyotr filipivich

The question arises.."which" spare part? Taken to the logical extreme, one should have at least 1 spare and complete lathe, and then a spare lathe for the spare lathe, and a spare lathe for the spare lathe, for the lathe....
Gunner
"Considering the events of recent years, the world has a long way to go to regain its credibility and reputation with the US." unknown
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wrote:

This is why I use a 1978 Maytag dishwasher which has been totally rebuilt over the years, have the same unit from 1989 (purchased for $10 four years ago) as a spare, and most parts of another one ($1) in a box out in the shed. I also have the "Maytag Man's" home address in case I need parts on a Sunday morning. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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02 Jul 2005 20:14:38 GMT in rec.crafts.metalworking :

    Yes, and your point...? :-) I'm sure as a machine broker, you would not mind providing these second machines, eh no? For a reasonable fee, it's not like I'm against people making a profit.
    All you need to do is figure out which parts are going to break first, and make the replacement part before they do.     Then in your afternoons, you can figure out the economic forecasts and which stocks to buy or sell. Evenings you're free to do what you want.     And in your spare time, no doubt you can figure out the answer tot he question: what do women want.     On second thought, lets go back to figuring out which part is going to break first and making the replacement before it does.
    

--
pyotr filipivich.
as an explaination for the decline in the US's tech edge, James
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Thats not entirely true. More and more parts for clausing machines are becoming unavailable. There are no parts for my rockwell machines.
chuck
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Chuck Sherwood wrote:

Well, to be fair... This is an Enco brand, made in 1986. Enco is still in business. If it were an American-made machine, and the company was still around, there would be parts available, at some price. For example, Clausing still offers most parts for the Atlas lathes, last made around 1970. They did not have this same gear for a lathe made in the early 1950s, but it was listed as recently as 4 years ago. That's a 50 year old lathe, not 20 like the Enco. 20 years is well within the normal service life of any lathe. Shame on Enco for not making an effort to support their older sales.
Rex B
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Enco brand, but not Enco-made. They don't seem to care much about supporting older machine tools that they've sold, but if you can find the original manufacturer you might have more luck.
I'm likely to take delivery of an Enco 105-1130 mill-drill soon, and while Enco can tell me nothing whatsoever about it and won't sell me parts, it looks for all the world like the ubiquitous RF-30 with an Enco tag, and (assuming my identification is correct) parts should be readily available straight from Rong-Fu. (Or Harbor Freight or whoever else is selling them right now...)

No arguments there.
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How fricking hard can it be to find a metric gear, given you have others in the gear train and the original, though damaged one? Sheesh. I'd *never* approach the lathe manufacturer in a case like this unless the gear had internal splines or something really, really oddball. And maybe not even then. You'd pay far more than a gear supplier would charge.
PDW
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<snip>

================================the problem may be that because metric gears are generally specified by module and pd, it is difficult to identify. Try this:
(1) Count the number of teeth on the good gear. (I sugest marking a space and not the tooth where you start.)
(2) Measure the outside diameter of the good gear in m/m
(3) Add 2 to the number of teeth [step 1]
(4) Divide the outside diameter of the gear by the number of teeth + 2. This will be the metric module, typically 1.00 or 1.50 for lathes in that size range.
(5) Measure the width of the teeth of the good gear in m/m.
Use google to look for gears you can adapt. If the gear cluster is not hard you should be able to machine off the damaged gear, and modify an existing gear to replace it. The newer epoxies combined with a light press fit should prove adequate, or you can drill/ream a 1/8 or 3/16 diameter hole at the joint between the shaft and gear and install a dowel pin as a round keyway.
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If it's difficult, then it might me the description. :-)
One way: m = do / (t+2)
with: m = module; do = diameter (outer), t = #of teeth
Or the other way (with two meshing gears): m = dist * 2 / (t1 + t2)
with: dist.: distance between axles t1, t2: # of teeth of gear1 & gear2 m: module
Nick
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- - Rex Burkheimer WM Automotive Fort Worth TX
Roger Shoaf wrote:

Will do. I did that on an Atlas last year, exact same situation, also a 16/32, albeit smaller. I did have a bit of a problem chucking onto the good gear (32 Tooth) so I could cut uff the bad gear that shared the common hub. I used a 3-jaw chuck, but I can see that a 4-jaw is the better choice based on simple division. Is there a better workholding method that is easier on the gear teeth? I do not have an arbor for this size but would buy one if that's the best tool.
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