OT, What to do with books? Help

I have 6 feet by 20 feet of text books (probably about 2-300), double stacked. 50+ years in the engineering profession.
Primary subjects are: Structural Engineering, Civil Engineering, Bridge design, Hydraulics, Electronics, and heavy on Mathematics. My heart will not let me throw them away. Gladly give them for free to anybody that could use them.
What have you all done with your library after your career winds down? Admittedly, the books are old, and all the information therein could be found on the internet today.
Few years ago I took 7 boxes of computer books and gave them to my local used book store. Found out a few weeks later that all were thrown out (many were only 2-3 years old) because people buy novels only. Won't do that again!
There was an age when all these books were necessary. How could you get by without "King's Hydraulic Tables"? GE's electronic tube characteristics, transistor data books etc. Math books on Boolean Algebra, Mechanical Vibrations and so forth.
Yes, I have not looked at these books for five years except the math books. Don't really NEED any of them, but they were my life. When I pass they will simply be thrown away. Maybe I should do it now.
Any experience with this down-sizing would be appreciated.
Ivan Vegvary
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/29/2015 5:18 PM, Ivan Vegvary wrote:

I would put them individually on Ebay, the reason is, when it sells you know that it went to somebody that wanted it. Otherwise it's hard to find someone that fits the nitch for your book. At least do a search of some you might think are wanted and see if they sold on Ebay. There new service where the do all the work, isn't available for books. Another option, a university library, one with a good engineering dept. Mikek
--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, August 29, 2015 at 6:37:19 PM UTC-4, amdx wrote:

When I am looking for a book , I search on ABE ( advance book exchange. ) There are a lot of places that sell technical books. Most of them list them on ABE. Unlike Ebay there is no time element.
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ivan, you face the same quandry facing all professionals for whom the technology has progressed past their prior art.
I am (albeit slowly) also discarding all the trappings of my prior engineering past, because they ARE now available on the Web. And if that collapses, and we're left in a "prior time", I'll still be more knowledgeable than 90% of the new students coming into the disciplines.
To be sure, the old books will still exist in paper libraries. It's not essential that we keep _everything_ we once relied up. I told my wife once, that if "the 'cataclysm' happens, my first stop will be to rob the local college library (which has an engineering school) -- even if it must be at gunpoint -- and I'm taking a BIG trailer!!!!"
LLoyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, August 29, 2015 at 3:47:35 PM UTC-7, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Lloyd, thanks for your words of wisdom. Ivan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Some books you can sell online. For example, machinist handbook or some such.
Most will end up being recycled into coupon mailings.
i

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, August 29, 2015 at 6:18:45 PM UTC-4, Ivan Vegvary wrote:

cked. 50+ years in the engineering profession.

esign, Hydraulics, Electronics, and heavy on Mathematics.

nybody that could use them.

ound on the internet today.

used book store. Found out a few weeks later that all were thrown out (man y were only 2-3 years old) because people buy novels only. Won't do that a gain!

by without "King's Hydraulic Tables"? GE's electronic tube characteristics , transistor data books etc. Math books on Boolean Algebra, Mechanical Vib rations and so forth.

s. Don't really NEED any of them, but they were my life. When I pass they will simply be thrown away. Maybe I should do it now.

Got a basement full of training, line maint. component locator, wiring manu al/schematics for L-1011 Tristar, B-747, B-727, Lockheed Electra, DC-6A/B, and on and on. Nobody even uses most of these old airliners anymore, but f ixing them every day was my life. If I could find any tech. school that co uld use them, that would be a good cause. But haven't had any luck and jus t can't bring myself to throw them out. But I never considered ebay. Might work, and go to somebody that wanted them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, August 29, 2015 at 9:18:39 PM UTC-5, Garrett Fulton wrote:

tacked. 50+ years in the engineering profession.

design, Hydraulics, Electronics, and heavy on Mathematics.

anybody that could use them.

found on the internet today.

l used book store. Found out a few weeks later that all were thrown out (m any were only 2-3 years old) because people buy novels only. Won't do that again!

t by without "King's Hydraulic Tables"? GE's electronic tube characteristi cs, transistor data books etc. Math books on Boolean Algebra, Mechanical V ibrations and so forth.

oks. Don't really NEED any of them, but they were my life. When I pass th ey will simply be thrown away. Maybe I should do it now.

nual/schematics for L-1011 Tristar, B-747, B-727, Lockheed Electra, DC-6A/B , and on and on. Nobody even uses most of these old airliners anymore, but fixing them every day was my life. If I could find any tech. school that could use them, that would be a good cause. But haven't had any luck and j ust can't bring myself to throw them out. But I never considered ebay. Mig ht work, and go to somebody that wanted them.
I keep reading about people re-purposing old airliners into homes and resta urants. Seems like those people would find those old manuals useful
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, August 29, 2015 at 10:56:45 PM UTC-4, Rex wrote:

stacked. 50+ years in the engineering profession.

ge design, Hydraulics, Electronics, and heavy on Mathematics.

to anybody that could use them.

?
be found on the internet today.

cal used book store. Found out a few weeks later that all were thrown out (many were only 2-3 years old) because people buy novels only. Won't do th at again!

get by without "King's Hydraulic Tables"? GE's electronic tube characteris tics, transistor data books etc. Math books on Boolean Algebra, Mechanical Vibrations and so forth.

books. Don't really NEED any of them, but they were my life. When I pass they will simply be thrown away. Maybe I should do it now.

manual/schematics for L-1011 Tristar, B-747, B-727, Lockheed Electra, DC-6A /B, and on and on. Nobody even uses most of these old airliners anymore, b ut fixing them every day was my life. If I could find any tech. school tha t could use them, that would be a good cause. But haven't had any luck and just can't bring myself to throw them out. But I never considered ebay. M ight work, and go to somebody that wanted them.

taurants. Seems like those people would find those old manuals useful
They're just gutting them, though, not trying to keep them flying. :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    Hmm ... I didn't see the original of this -- just the quoted part shown here. However, I've been trying to find documentation of the pinouts in one particular instrument (picked up at a hamfest, and going into my project of building a flight simulator).
    The instrument is a HSI from an A6 based on the tape stuck to it when I got it -- military at least. And it looks like the one in the A7-A which I am trying to duplicate. (I was one of those working (as an "assembler") in building such a simulator decades ago, and two employees ago. (Now retired. :-)
    The model is: Indicator P/O AF/A24J-1     522-2411-003     Mfr: 13499
    Trying to trace it out, I find what looks like some pins connected to synchros, and some to resolvers, but it would help greatly if I knew what was what, so I could design computer interfaces to drive it.
    I was lucky enough to find the procurement description of the three-axis ADI which also matches what the A7-A had), so I can talk to it properly now.
    My e-mail needs to be fixed as shown in the .sig below (hope your news client does not hide it). I can't see your e-mail address from what was quoted -- even assuming that it is a valid one.
    So -- if you have something which documents this instrument, I would be happy to pay you for it. Everything you mention is commercial aircraft, but who knows what else you might have. :-)
    Thanks much,         DoN.
--
Remove oil spill source from e-mail
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | (KV4PH) Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, August 30, 2015 at 11:17:52 PM UTC-4, DoN. Nichols wrote:

Sorry, sir. I've got nothing military in my literature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 29 Aug 2015 15:18:42 -0700 (PDT), Ivan Vegvary

Grrrrrrrrrrrrrr! I sure love those narrow-minded people.

What about Kent's ME Handbook and Mark's Standard Handbook for MEs? I found 'em for a few bucks apiece online.

Ivan, don't throw them away. Offer them on for sale on Craigslist, eBay, or Amazon, or give them away on FreeCycle so they find new homes with good families.
--
The mind is like a parachute. It doesn't work until it's opened.
--Frank Zappa
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/29/2015 6:18 PM, Ivan Vegvary wrote:

Same problem. I have been donating mine to the local library and taking a tax deduction. They have a book fair a couple of times a year so I have the hope they go to a good home.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, August 30, 2015 at 7:20:12 AM UTC-4, George wrote:

I help at the local friends of the library book sale ( and get to see what is for sale before the general public ). But the sad thing is that they have no technical books at the sale. They do not believe anyone wants old tech books.
I think it is far better to either sell them your self thru ABE or Alibris. Or look on ABE and Alibris and find a seller who is close to you. They may not give you anything or not very much, but the books will go to someone that wants them.
If you do sell them yourself , let us know so we can consider buying some.
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can also sell books through Amazon. My wife has sold quite a number of obscure technical books & college texts there. Powells also used to specialize in technical books.
There are some places you can donate books to that promise they won't pulp them. Some places ship them to developing countries.
My father was an applied mathematician at Los Alamos, and had a huge library of technical books. It took years, but we managed to find homes for most of them through universities.
I am in the process of retiring, but I will be consulting for a while. I have a large collection of RF & microwave books I just dragged home from my office, some of which I had to search for used. There's a lot of "lost art" in the field that isn't included in newer books. Even some of the "classic" books that are still reprinted have a lot of errors. I have a marked up copy of one such book that is irreplaceable, as well as a lengthy errata for another book. That is also info that isn't on-line anywhere.
I also have 35 years worth of articles ripped out of trade journals, many of which are no longer around, and thus not on-line either. There's also a lot of good design & application info that used to be in the back of vendor catalogs. With all the consolidation in the industry, most of those companies no longer exist, and the application info has vanished with them. My plan is to scan these a bit at a time so they are in a searchable form. I've been asked to give occasional guest lectures at a local engineering school, and they will be very handy for preparing class material. At least once it is in digital form, it will be easier to pass along.
Doug White
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There are valuable books and there are worthless books.
Worthless books include most fiction, self-help, and business management theory.
However, many technical books are valuable and can be sold. It can be hard to tell which are valuable and which are not, without extensive research.
Three years ago, I bought four crates of Hyster forklift service manuals, at an auction of a failed Hyster dealership, for $50 for all four crates (plus buyer premium). To date, I sold 290 of them, and got paid $22,349. I still have 236 of them, at the asking price of $18,961, and I surmise that most of those will never be sold due to lack of demand.
i
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, August 30, 2015 at 3:58:41 PM UTC-4, Ignoramus20476 wrote:

That's 77 dollars apiece for the first batch. Are those service manuals that rare and valuable?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They are not rare. I did some research after I bought them, and found out that they could be bought for $300 each from Hyster.
They are, however, valuable, in the sense that people needing to repair forklifts, or some people who just buy a new forklift, want to buy a maintenance/repair manual.
As far as I am concerned, we fix a lot of forklifts and do not use such manuals all that much. Old forklifts are relatively simple. We also know a gentleman named Jimmy who is a walking forklift manual.
i
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Look up your book titles on this site before you get rid of them. Some old books are very valuable. http://www.bookfinder.com/
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 30 Aug 2015 04:35:05 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@krl.org"

I spent an afternoon shopping on the bookseller's street (can't remember the name) in London decades ago. I was hoping for steam, machining, etc. old British texts. Very disappointing, lots of used book stores, zero old technical stuff.
Pete Keillor
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.