Pretty good cutting fluid for aluminum

Some while ago Ernie mentioned that limonene is a really good cutting fluid for machining aluminum.
Just for the heck of it I bought a bottle of "Goo-Gone". The label
doesn't say what's in it other than some mention of "citrus power". Maybe limonene?
I tried it for turning and parting off aluminum, probably 6063, with HSS toolbits. It worked very nicely (better than Tapamatic I think), left a nice finish, it's cheap, readily available and it even smells good.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yeah, but yer shop is going to smell like a girly shop. That's sort of sacreligious--almost like having a clean shop. . Others have claimed WD-40 is da bomb for aluminum, having a kerosene base. It's $10-11/gal at HD. Is your stuff as cheap?
Unlikely that the limonene is a factor, as it's likely only 1% of the product, if that. More likely whatever the bulk ingredient.
--
------
Mr. P.V.'d (formerly Droll Troll), Yonkers, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Proctologically Violated©® wrote:

Considering what crap it is, it works quite good for cutting Al. :-) But it's too expensive for that application.
Now what was the application it is worth buying it? ... AHH!! Remove the gum left behind by ... WD-40!
I like cyclic products that have a recursive application. :-))
Nick
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Proctologically Violated©® wrote:

Any vegetable based grease will work.
Pam is one of the easiest ones to use with the pressurized spray can.
John
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Try Diesel fuel. It works a treat. Steve

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It stinks very badly. I like its smell in small quantities, but not in large quantities.
i

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don Foreman wrote:

Why don't you use coolant fluid? Plain old water with soluble oil? Works really good for Al too. Alcohol and all the other suggested crap like diesel fuel aren't good for your health and also bit risky in the shop. Also, alcohol doesn't lube, it only cools.
Nick
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nick Mueller wrote:

Beer?
John
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
john wrote:

I prefer drinking it (after work). May be different for what *you* call "beer". :-))
Nick, Munich, Bavaria.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
john wrote:

New or used?
Wasting new beer is a crime.
In the privacy of your own shop, I don't care what you do with used beer.
technomaNge
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 26 Jun 2007 20:55:23 -0500, technomaNge

Trust me on this, some of the beer here in the USA is better off wasted...
Our offerings/choices have improved though in the past 20 or so years since Carter loosened up the brewing regs. There are some really dandy/yummy brews available now and you can find them most anywhere.
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 26 Jun 2007 13:37:00 -0500, Don Foreman

Yesterday I bought a gallon of WD-40 for lubing aluminum. I am makiing some 24" discs for the wife. The racoons are eating her out of house and home at her bird feeders and she hopes that the discs will act like "rat guards" to keep the critters from climbing the poles and tipping the whole work over. Anyway, the AL is, I think, 2024 as it cuts like crap and clogs the flutes of the end mill if I don't keep an eagle eye on it. The WD-40 worked well using a spray bottle and giving regurlar squirts on the tool.
When I get the discs assembled on the poles I will snap a photo and post it.
Errol Groff
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have the same problem with both racoons and squirels. I did not go to disks as big as you have. Instead got some fairly large stainless pot lids from Saint Vincent de Paul. The pole I have is some rebar so the racoons have a slightly hard time climbing it anyway. The pot lid is not rigid to the pole so when they grab onto the outside, it tilts.
Dan
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 26 Jun 2007 17:30:26 -0400, Errol Groff

Hi Errol,
Go to your favorite local supplier that carries PVC pipe and buy some 4-6 inch diameter stuff. Cut it to 5-6 foot length and slip it over your pole holding up the bird feeder. They have a hard time getting a grip on this stuff. Some guys say that 6 inch stove pipe works fine too and that can be wrapped around the pole without removing the feeder.
Remember squirrels can jump straight up about 6 feet and can leap 8 to 10 feet from buildings, branches, wires... you might as well plan on keeping them off too. If you've got Flying Squirrels all bets are off. They defy gravity.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The niece's boyfriend at the time bought a rotating gizmo for the bird feeders, battery-powered, supposed to sling the tree rats off ala carousel when they hit the lid. Would have liked to have seen it in action, but the sister's all-meat, twin 15 lb cats can jump up into the trees and have taken care of the tree rats as well as regular rats, mice, voles and the occasional rabbit. Self-powered with 4 legs beats battery power in this case. Coons go after the sweet corn, not the bird feeders.
Stan
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 27 Jun 2007 12:30:41 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@prolynx.com wrote:
<snip>

Hi Stan,
That sounds like a Yankee Flipper bird feeder. If you want to see some sales/promo videos of it in action look here:
http://www.yankeeflipper.com /
If you do a google search you will find even more videos:
http://www.google.com/search?&q=yankee+flipper+squirrel+feeder+video
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 27 Jun 2007 14:12:45 -0400, Leon Fisk

We tried the PVC trick but it wasn't very successful. At the local greasy spoon this AM we chatted with our local state trooper and he suggested a .410 solution to the problem. I don't own any firearms (no prejudice just don't happen to own any) so I will have to check with my son the corrections officer and see what he has. Or I will ask at school tomorrow if anyone has something I can borrow.
Errol Groff
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think you will find that killing is a temporary solution. My neighbor is soft hearted and has trapped racoons and transported them off the island far enough away that they undoubtedly did not come back. But other racoons soon took up the slack.
Dan
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 27 Jun 2007 19:23:47 -0400, Errol Groff

Hi Errol,
Wow! This is an oft discussed topic in the rec.birds group and I have never heard of it failing so completely before.
What size pipe did you try and how long was it?
How was it defeated? Did they just wrap there paws around the pipe and shuck and pump their way to the top?
If the latter I think I would try a silicon polish on the PVC and make it extra slippery for awhile. Bumping up the diameter of the pipe should help too. Usually this is used for squirrels and maybe it needs to be larger in diameter to defeat raccoons.
I have also heard that a 5 gallon bucket (or similar item) turned upside down and suspended by its top works pretty well too. The critter tries to climb up the pipe support and ends up inside the bucket and/or the rim of it doesn't give them enough purchase to make it around the bucket.
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon Fisk wrote:

My neighbor has the answer for squirrels. He tacked a length of old 300 twin TV wire on the top edge of the feeder. He bared the top edges of the wire and connected to an old Ford coil and a switch in the house. When a squirrel gets on it he powers the coil. Said he had to tie the roof down on the feeder because the squirrel would knock it off when they went straight up!
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.