Stainless steel, epoxy, and tableware

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    Yes!

    [ ... ]

    Maybe only a quarter of the knives were in regular use and thus regularly run through the dishwasher.
    Sorry that I can't suggest how to fix them.
    Good Luck,         DoN.
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On Tuesday, December 31, 2013 at 4:01:27 PM UTC-6, Frnak McKenney wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Classic problem with 2-part knives. We have a bunch of them that are doing the same. There is a cavity in the handle that builds up steam pressure in the dry cycle of the dishwasher. Yes, I'm guessing if you heat them and press the blade back in, it will do the job. These things are so old, I doubt they used epoxy, more liekly some older form of glue.
Jon
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On Thursday, February 2, 2017 at 2:55:59 PM UTC-5, Jon Elson wrote:

Epoxies came into widespread commercial use around 1950. If it's really old, more likely it's phenolic.
None of those thermosets can reliably be released with heat. It depends on the specific chemistry and the percentage of solids; If they're 100% solids, it's unlikely you can release them with heat.
I have some of those knives, which have been in the family since 1963. None of them have ever seen the inside of a dishwasher. They're really not up to it. Neither is anything else that contains a lot of silver.
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Ed Huntress

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Ed, Jon,
Thanks for the comments. Will pass them along.
Frank
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On Sun, 19 Feb 2017 16:18:36 -0600, Frnak McKenney

Check this site out if you need a high temperature cement. http://www.sauereisen.com/ceramic-assembly/product-index/
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On Mon, 20 Feb 2017 11:27:12 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.com wrote:

That's probably a really pricy hi-tech goo.
I think I'd try a highly flexible, waterproof adhesive instead. Either Plumber's Goop or E6000, which are very nearly identical. https://www.amazon.com/E6000-237032-Craft-Adhesive-Clear/dp/B004BPHQWU
Dry the handle, use a toothpick to work some adhesive into the recess, then push the cleaned stainless part in. Dry overnight, then pare off the squeezeout. That should fix them for your lifetime, at least.
If they don't have notches (handle and knife shank), make a few for better retention.
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