Steam Cooker, SAFETY VALVE (Repair?)

i bot a used pressure cooker, <>c1994 vintage, which has a defective safety fitting. not really a valve, it looks like a one time release device, or it has
been damaged by someone poking it out with a nail or drill bit.
the device unscrews and so is replaceable, s/b cheap if not unique, but where would i find it? it is difficult to know, but under magnification it appears that something was soldered into the opening, maybe a thin brass disk that blows out under pressure.`
any experience or suggestions w/be much appreciated.
Thanks! --Loren
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Weld it shut and cook like a madman!!!! Just keep the kids back a safe distance<g>.
JTMcC.

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LOL. This is my Mom's story about somebody she knew who was using a large pressure cooker, and they were having troubles with the pressure valve, which on most is a weight with an internally loaded spring pop-off.
The user had tied the safety valve down on the cooker and the secondary relief - which on those is a rubber blow-out plug - activated.
This causes the contents of the pressure cooker to be rapidly ejected, quite forcefully, out of the relief opening. I think she said something about the contents being some kind of beets or something. But apparently it was a real mess.
Jim
================================================= please reply to: JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com =================================================
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I used to service some industrial pressure cookers for a local fast food chain. They used them for cooking chicken parts. They had a heavy cast aluminum lid, with two large silicone o rings to seal them. The safety valve was a 5 pound weight, with a conical valve seat on the bottom. Some of the managers were cheap, and wouild wait until both seals failed. There would be shredded chicken all over the kitchen when that happened. A flange in the lid directed the blast downward, but the force was so great, that chicken bits would be all over the ceiling.
Steve R.
JTMcC says...

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Chicken! a great idea, i have not had been successful with just pan frying. now we need to know what preparation the chicken shacks use and the type of batter(?). --Loren

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The cookers used liquid Crisco. As for the batter, it was proprietary, but I figured it out. After all, I managed some of those joints at one time! The chicken bits were first dipped in a precoater, which was just milk & corn starch, or flour. it was then rolled in the coating. This was salt, flour, pepper, and paprika. It then went into a basket, and was deep-fry pressure cooked for 15 minutes.
Steve R.
JTMcC says...

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thanks! a good starting point. hmmmm, deep-fry _and_ pressure, sounds dangerous. not sure i would want to be around those large cookers.
how do they manage the oil? e.g., frequency of change? --Loren

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The oil was topped up as required. There was a valve underneath to drain the machine. It was drained, and filtered daily, and replaced once a week.
Steve R.
JTMcC says...

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Might it not have simply been that it blew out under pressure, as it's designed to do, leaving a hole?
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http://inquisitor.i.am/ | mailto: snipped-for-privacy@i.am | Ian Stirling.
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I think these are a soft, low temp alloy device that vents pressure if the pot becomes too hot or the contents has foamed up, blocking the pressure regulator weight orfice. A simple device similar to the safety release on a water heater, I think.
If it's a Mirro (or another been around for a while) brand name, you can probably get a model number from the bottom of the pot and get a replacement part.
WB ............

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Any appliance parts supply store should have it in stock.
Steve Smith
Loren Coe wrote:

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wrote:

I've got an older pressure cooker that is quite large and uses six big bakelite wing nuts to hold the lid down. It uses a tapered flange to make a metal to metal seal instead of the usual rubber seal. Even though old they are still made by the same company. I don't have the cooker in front of me so can't tell you the name but they are on the web. All this to tell you that mine has the same kind of safety device and that they are no longer sold. Instead, the company sells a safety blow off that screws into the hole but is resettable. My unit has the one time plug, the resettable plug and a guage. I just googled for pressure cookers. Found mine. It is an All American brand 25 QT pressure canner. If yours matches then google for All American pressure canner. ERS
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wrote:

That's a backup heat safety used on one of the brands of pressure cookers (It's been 20 years since I sold them in a hardware store and the name is escaping me at the moment). They have a low temp alloy in them that melts. You should be able to get one at any place which stocks the gaskets. They're a standard replacement item.
Wayne Cook Shamrock, TX
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...>>
that would explain it, it does look like tiny beads of solder or something metalic remains in the hole. i have found some stuff on the web, so it looks promising. i am thinking of taping it over with some alum duct tape and watching it real carefully to make sure it doesn't stop 'perking'- just as a temporary fix.
when i bot the thing, it looked complete. felt like a nitwit after bringing home. thanks to all of you guys, always a wealth of knowledge. Best Regards, --Loren
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wrote:

A pressure cooker is a FINE thing to have, and extremely versatile. They use a fraction of the energy to cook as a regular pot or oven, you may can with the bigger ones, make a great water distillery, a nifty hat steamer with the weight removed, and a host of other uses.
A pressure cooker is a survivalists friend, and is one of the most treasured and sought out cooking devices. I have 4.
Gunner
"You cannot invade the mainland United States. There would be a rifle behind each blade of grass." --Japanese Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto
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They are also great for cooking at high altitudes.
Anyone who has ever had underdone baked potatos at 3000 ft can testify....
Jim
================================================= please reply to: JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com =================================================
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jim snipped-for-privacy@newsguy.com says...

Ya know, it never occurred to me before, but maybe that pot of spaghetti I made in a cheap motel in Tucumcari NM was so nasty on account of the 4000' altitude. One of the worst things I've ever eaten.
Ned Simmons
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Gunner says...

Ned, you were so far out of your element that everything probably tasted funny in Tucumcari, NM. Your story reminded me of a Mexican restaurant in Minot, ND.
Bob Swinney
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net says...

Very perceptive of you, Bob. You don't know the half of it. The food shopping for this road trip from Boston to Tucson was left to my roommate. His idea of good nutrition on the road was a case of Hi-C and two shopping bags of outdated Drake's Cakes. I nearly killed a starving stray dog in a Stuckey's parking lot when I fed him a pack of Ring-Dings.
Could a Mexican restaurant in ND be any worse than a Chinese restaurant in Sept-Iles, Quebec?
Ned Simmons
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Stuckey's is still very much in business, with over 200 stores in 19 states. http://www.stuckeys.com /
Gary
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