what type of press is this?



The Saugus Ironworks is really cool. After the American Iron & Steel Institute paid for the archaeology and restoration, they ran the blast furnace and finery/chafery at least once. They made a docu movie which has footage of the furnace running and operating the huge helve hammer. (Sadly, only about 30 sec. of each.) Then they turned it over to the US National Park Service which allowed everything to deteriorate. When I visited, late 80s IIRC, the hammer could be run but much of the works was inoperable. The water wheels run on water pumped from the river below because the former mill pond is now a heavily built up residential area. Big ol' pump concealed in the restored "coal shed".
As intriguing as the actual site is, the it is equally so that they could organize it at all when the England, the source of the money, technology and skills was engaged in a furious and bloody civil war over religion, politics, regicide and other unpleasantnesses.
In any event, they managed to bring the latest iron-making technology to the wilderness, a technical success if not a capitalist one.

Our 1860-1880 house has vertical 3" thick hemlock plank walls, cut on an up-and-down saw. Allegedly there was such a saw in operation in a nearby village until the 1930s. There is still an oar & handle mill at the mill pond there. The present owner has hopes of restoring the head race, repairing the gates and running it on water. The turbine is still functional as it was in operation as recently as the late 70s. Turbines were far more common here than water wheels because most mill ponds were in relatively flat country rather than having numerous deep defiles with streams at the bottom -- low dams, low head but plenty of head for a vertical shaft cast iron turbine.
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada

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wrote:

I remember thinking the hammer drive didn't seem built to withstand much use, as I had made toy wooden models of machinery and seen how fast wood rubbing surfaces wear.
The Taylor mill had more iron reinforcement on its wooden linkages and much of it had worked loose, making the operation quite clanky. The operator told me it had been assembled from salvaged mill parts and wasn't really historically accurate. IIRC the fittings had been cast instead of forged.
While he watched the saw the operator was splitting wooden shingles with a ragged excuse for a froe. There was no maintenance fund to buy a decent one. My first attempt to make them a froe is far below museum quality. At least I got the parts I'd collected for a heat treating oven assembled and working.
My father had an old Audel Millwrights and Mechanics Guide from his time in the cotton mills so I had an idea of the work involved. If you mastered all the skills in that book you could recreate civilization.
-jsw
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On Wednesday, February 6, 2019 at 5:34:54 AM UTC-8, Jim Wilkins wrote: [about Saugus ironworks ]

In the age of sail, the wood used for rubbing surfaces was lignum vitae or similar; it wore rather better than one would expect. And, it's endangered with very little available for modelmaking.
Some old eighteenth-century clocks with lignum vitae bearings are still telling time.
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https://lignumvitaesolutions.com/industries/marine-industry/
My family heirloom wooden-geared grandfather clock is still telling the time every 6:03.
My memory of visiting the Saugus Iron Works some 60 years ago was that it looked "authentic", ie crude, compared to the structure in our 1830 mill owner's house.
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That was my impression, too. But dang! It worked! Pilgrims landed at Plymouth in 1620 and set up a hardscrabble subsistence existence on the edge of the wilderness. Less than 30 years later, the ironworks proprietors built a high-tech industrial plant even further out into the wilderness.
(Roughly in the middle of that interval, Harvard College was founded on a muddy intersection across the river from the town of Boston with all nine or so students enrolled.)
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada

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writes:

Ironically the Pilgrims were saved by a local native named Squanto who was more worldly and experienced than they were, having lived and worked in London and on several voyages.
http://mayflowerhistory.com/tisquantum/ "On March 16, they got a surprise: an Indian named Samoset walked right into the Colony and welcomed them in broken English."
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Didn't know that and I even lived for a winter in Plymouth between jobs.
I suppose that there may have been some advantage to the ironworks proprietors the the Massachusetts Bay Colony was heavy to dissenters who have have been scum from the virepoint of the Church of England but were not retarded in business or technology. I'll have to re-read the book published just after the Saugus restoration.
TYVM.
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada

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The Boston area Puritan colonists weren't such extreme Separatists. https://www.nytimes.com/1999/10/24/nyregion/l-separating-the-pilgrims-from-the-puritans-080128.html
The next colony to the south tolerated all beliefs. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Williams
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Why do you think US and Canadian speech sounds almost identical yet so different from British?
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To the extent that's true, I'd assume the influence of the media. Lots of US TV here in Canada, not so much from the UK. I haven't had a TV for 40 years but I see it periodically over my dentist's chair. Last time to the tooth wrangler, I realized US TV can be characterized as "fat people yelling at each other". Unfair, I know, to programs such as yoga classes but a fair first approximation?
But then...
Many up-scale folks in Toronto & Ottawa have inflections that sound to people from other provinces as "kinda British". Rural people in Nova Scotia didn't sound either Brit or Merkin 50 years ago, unique Lunenburg (German influence) and Cape Breton (Scots and Gaelic) pronounciation and usage. After moving here 50 years ago, I had to learn that "C'mintha hice" was an invitation to enter. That's all fading gradually away.
In 1980, I was on a bus filled with other blacksmiths proceeding from Ironbridge to Hereford. A guy in the seat behind me -- a certified Brit whose normal delivery was what I took to be UK upper-middle-class urban -- was recounting a yarn to his seatmate in some particular English regional dialect. It sounded exactly like the adults I knew in (Leftpondian) New Hampshire 65 years ago.
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada

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wrote in message

My grandmother had the traditional New Hampshire accent but my mother didn't, and my father had completely lost his southern Appalachian accent, both before television. I think WW2 stirring the younger people all together had a considerable effect. Chuck Yeager's backwoods twang was said to be incomprehensible at first, then after he gained fame many pilots imitated his drawl on the radio. In Atlanta I noticed that network TV announcers spoke in the "standard" Midwestern accent.
My real question is whether or not Canadians allowed themselves to be influenced by USian speech. My impression is that like Quebecois we are tolerated but not imitated.
http://www.bl.uk/learning/langlit/sounds/find-out-more/received-pronunciation/ Somewhere (haven't found it) I read that RP was an imitation of the newly rich East Midlands mill owners and their public (USA: private) school sons, a product of the Industrial Revolution that took hold simultaneously with our Revolution, so that Americans who visited London afterwards commented on the change while the USA and Canada preserved the older accent. -jsw
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wrote in message

The PBS network presents BBC dramas like Masterpiece Theatre, Dr Who and Downton Abbey, and David Attenborough narrates Nature, so we can hear plenty of proper British if we choose to. The only Canadian show I watched regularly was Forever Knight, set in Toronto. Geraint Wyn Davies and Catherine Disher could be mistaken for Americans, Nigel Bennet delivered his midnight radio host monologs as though he was doing Shakespeare. https://www.gryffonslair.com/fk/lccerks3.html
Others assumed various accents including Cockney. You might know Wyn Davies from the Nova Scotia series Black Harbour.
-jsw
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On 07/02/2019 06:52, Mike Spencer wrote:

I think TV has an influence as a number of Dutch friends, especially younger ones, speak English with a pronounced US accent and they have a lot of US programs on Dutch TV.
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wrote in message

The Germans who spoke English sounded American too. Generally the well-educated foreign English speakers I've met, such as from Argentina and Africa, had British accents. I don't expect American to be the world standard.
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On Thursday, February 7, 2019 at 11:37:30 AM UTC-5, Jim Wilkins wrote:

A few decades ago, linguists were saying that the main influence that disti nguished American English was that of German immigrants. The blended result was the general accent we Murkins have today.
I haven't checked to see if this opinion has remained the same in the years since.
Of course, there were many other influences as well, and a lot of regional differences that are slowly disappearing. For example, the area of New Engl and from Providence to the north still tends toward non-rhotic ("r" is sile nt) pronunciations, except for those who came from southwestern England (li ke my ancestors).
--
Ed Huntress

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wrote in message

Sorry, I forgot the ellipsis.
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On 01/02/2019 06:11, Cydrome Leader wrote:

I've not seen a powered one like that but it's basically a fly press as others have mentioned. For manual operation they're quite nice as you get a feel for the energy input required to do the job so you adjust accordingly. I have one and they're quite common in the UK. The pic posted of a bunch of them in Texas looks a lot like Norton or Sweeney & Blocksidge but I expect they were made in the US as well.
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The Brit blacksmiths love fly presses and Blacker hammers, both of which are like hen's teeth in Leftpondia. Another use was architectural ceramics: clay, damp but not wet, was put into a mould/form and rammed with a flypress, then fired. Apparently a way to force the items to retain dimension, not so easy with wet clay.
AFAIK, some flypresses have a simple screw but the one I had a close look at Britain had a two-pitch screw, ingenious and very effective.
Details, photo and diagram here:
http://home.tallships.ca/mspencer/nut.html
Retired but I'd still love to have one to mess about with.
Some other smithing oddments if yer interested:
http://home.tallships.ca/mspencer/tools.html
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada

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On 02/02/2019 06:36, Mike Spencer wrote:

My Sweeney & Blocksidge has a 2 pitch screw but that is quite normal for many makes. The coarse thread is what applies the force and the fine thread is at the upper end of the screw and is what the stop collar fits to to allow fine adjustment of the ram travel.
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wrote:

From what little I saw the top die descends until the workpiece stops it, which suits them to stamping identical repetitive details on batches of variably thick hand-forged parts for wrought-iron railings etc. I think an arbor press would be as or more useful to a machinist.
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