OT: The Geek Test

snipped-for-privacy@L4software.com says...


IIRC, I read somewhere that Aaron knew about the functionality of that switch as the result of someone tripping over and unplugging the power cord for the simulator unit (or something like that).
--
Kurt Kesler

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Kurt Kesler wrote:

From "Apollo: The Race to the Moon", by Murray and Cox, pp375-377 (and I get 5 geek points for knowing where it was and retyping it here...)
"About a year earlier, Aaron had been sitting in the MOCR at midnight as part of a small team led by Glynn Lunney. They were "watching" a test at K.S.C.--just one more way of familiarizing themselves with their systems. The test was proceeding normally when the parameters on Aaron's screens suddenly chnaged to a strange pattern--not zeros, but an incomprehensible set of values. Then the numbers returned to normal."
"The morning after the test, Aaron retrieved a hard copy of the anomalous screens from the computer and took it back to his office--there was no particular reason for doing so, just Aaron's uncommon curiousity. Aaron couldn't make any sense of the numbers he had seen. As persistent as he was curious, Aaron got Lunney to call the Cape and find out what had happened. The Cape wasn't pleased to have Houston call and demand to know how they had screwed up, but they disclosed nonetheless that a test conductor had accidentally dropped the power system on the C.S.M. to unusually low voltages."
"Aaron went looking for one of the instrumentation specialists at M.S.C., trying to find out why the screen had reacted in such a peculiar way under low voltage. They spent hours on it. Finally, the instrumentation guy zeroed in on the signal-condition equipment, S.C.E., a box of electronics that performed an obscure role in translating the information from the sensors into the signals that went to the displays in the spacecraft and on the ground. It had a primary and an auxiliary position. In the primary position, where it was ordinarily set, it had a sensor that would turn the S.C.E. off under low voltage. In the auxiliary position, the S.C.E. would attempt to run even under low-voltage conditions. "You know," the instrumentation guy told Aaron, "that signal-conditioning equipment had tripped off because you were in primary. Now, if you'd gone to auxiliary, you would have wiped this circuit out and you would have got your readings back." Aaron thought that was interesting."
"It is part of flight-controller etiquette to credit the back room reflexively. Whenever flight controllers are reminiscing about a memorable call, the formula is always, "Ol' Bill had been working with the boys in the back room, and they came up with..." Steve Bales, who had done that with Jack Garman on Apollo 11, put it best when he compared the men in the back and front rooms to two mountain climbers roped together. And virtually without exception, the assumption that the back room was involved in a major call is correct. In the case of John Aaron on Apollo 12, it is not. There was no time. When Griffin asked Aaron, "How's it looking?" Aaron was just starting to call his back room."
""Is that the S.C.E.?" he asked, already sure of the answer."
""Boy, I don't know, John," a worried voice came back, "It sure looks--""
"Griffin, getting no answer to his first call to EECOM (he could not hear Aaron's exchange with the back room over his loop), tried again, needing an answer quickly: "EECOM, what do you see?""
"Aaron cut off his back room and punched up the Flight loop. "Flight, EECOM. Try S.C.E. to Aux.""
"Griffin was surprised. In the first place, he was ready to call an abort, and was already preparing himself for that irrevocable step. In the second place, he had no idea what "S.C.E." referred to. Never in any of the simulations or the Mission Techniques had that switch been mentioned. Griffin wasn't sure he'd heard Aaron right, and in fact he hadn't."
""Say again. S.C.E. to 'Off'?""
""Aux," corrected Aaron. The MOCR's was truly the most economical language in the world."
"Griffin played it back to Aaron, needing to be sure: "S.C.E. to Aux.""
"As he confirmed, Aaron loosened up, using two whole words: "Auxiliary, Flight."
"Griffin still had no idea what Aaron was talking about, but once again trust made the system work."
""S.C.E. to Aux, CapCom," Griffin said."
"CapCom sat immediately in front and to the left of the flight director. Carr turned his head and looked back up at Griffin with a "What the hell is that?" expression on his face, but his was not to question why. In this situation, CapCom had two responsibilities: to communicate clearly and to radiate confidence. Carr did both, his voice sounding as if he were relaying a standard procedure that would make everything okay: "Apollo 12, Houston. Try S.C.E. to Auxiliary. Over.""
""What panel, EECOM?" Griffin asked. He was asking Aaron on which instrument panel in the spacecraft this hitherto unknown switch was located--if Carr, an astronaut, didn't seem to know what S.C.E. referred to, it was entirely possible that Conrad and his crew didn't either."
"Pet Conrad, riding on top of a Saturn V in a spacecraft whose alarm panel was lit up like a pinball machine, seemed as mystified by the instruction as Carr and Griffin had been."
""N.C.E. to Auxiliary," he said dutifully."
""S.C.E, S.C.E., to Auxiliary," CapCom repeated. This time the crew heard right. Al Bean, the lunar module pilot, knew where the S.C.E. switch was, and clicked it to the position labeled "Auxiliary.""
"Griffin was still worried that the crew didn't know hot to put S.C.E. to Aux and asked again, "What panel, EECOM?" But by this time everything had changed."
""We got it back, Flight," Aaron said laconically, meaning that the data--interpretable data--had come back up on his screen. "Looks good." Now that he had data, Aaron could also deduce that the fuel cells that powered the C.S.M. had, for reasons unknown, been disconnected."
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says...

I say 10 for knowing and a bonus 5 for the typing.
--
Kurt Kesler

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David Erbas-White wrote:

That is a great book. I first read it nearly many years ago when I was managing a large software project. Every night I'd read a chapter or two before going to bed, and then lie awake thinking about all the ways I could find analogies between what they went through to pull off Apollo and what any major development project endures.
I've said it many times that that book should be mandatory reading for all Project Managers.
...Rick
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Rick Dunseith wrote:

Actually, I did read it many years ago, nothing "nearly" about it...
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Schweickart. Shortly before "Houston, we've got a problem here..."
    Bob Kaplow    NAR # 18L    TRA # "Impeach the TRA BoD"         >>> To reply, remove the TRABoD! <<< Kaplow Klips & Baffle:    http://nira-rocketry.org/LeadingEdge/Phantom4000.pdf www.encompasserve.org/~kaplow_r/ www.nira-rocketry.org www.nar.org
Save Model Rocketry from the HSA! http://www.space-rockets.com/congress.html
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Bzzzt. Wrong mission.
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Yea, I figgured that out about as dast as I hit the return key. CANCEL doesn't seem to work very fast...
    Bob Kaplow    NAR # 18L    TRA # "Impeach the TRA BoD"         >>> To reply, remove the TRABoD! <<< Kaplow Klips & Baffle:    http://nira-rocketry.org/LeadingEdge/Phantom4000.pdf www.encompasserve.org/~kaplow_r/ www.nira-rocketry.org www.nar.org
Save Model Rocketry from the HSA! http://www.space-rockets.com/congress.html
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BZZTT!!! You just lost 5 geek points! Read the rest of the thread...
David Erbas-White
Bob Kaplow wrote:

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Bob Kaplow wrote:

Some things I've recently been accused of being a geek over:
Know the names of >5 chess openings.
Boot a computer from front panel address/data/control buttons.
Know what "heavy water" is.
Know what the symbol on a RADHAZ sign represents.
Know the Big Dipper is not a constellation.
Know it's real nomenclature.
Know >10 famous astronomers.
Know what they are famous for?
Know the difference between a Florence and an Erlenmeyer.
Know what Einstein REALLY received the Nobel Prize for.
Know James T. Kirk's full middle name.
Telling math jokes. (A good test of REAL geekiness)
"What do you get when you cross a mountain climber and a chicken?" "You can't cross them, one is a scalar."
It's a heavy burden. If you got the math joke, add 1% to your geek score. If you think its funny, add 5%.
--
Gary Bolles
NAR 82636
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Check. Add more points if you know reactions to use it in.

Check. But, that is just because I'm on my company's Safety Committee. Wait a minuite... I *am* the Safety Committee. Add more points if you have ever worn a Bell Telephone hardhat on a passenger aircraft with more than 200 people aboard.

Check.
Check.
Does Tim Hamner count?

Ahh, but do you remember the Fleaker?

I named my cat after what the T. stands for.

Why was 6 mad at 7? Because 7 ate 9. (Trust me, tell it to a room of 12-year-olds sometime.)

Checkeroonie.
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These days you get points for even knowing what a Bell Telephone is!

You guys should really do more drugs!
:)
Jerry
--
Jerry Irvine, Box 1242, Claremont, California 91711 USA
Opinion, the whole thing. <mail to: snipped-for-privacy@gte.net>
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Jerry Irvine wrote: ...

any points for having some in a box in the garage? give me three points. how about double points for having them on your POTS line?

does Ibuprofen count? :(
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How about the integral of d(cabin)/cabin = log cabin
(actually it's ln(cabin) + c ..... = houseboat )
Brad Hitch
SO what DOES the T. stand for? I don't remember ever hearing that one (and I should have).

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I remember hearing it. Tiberius or Tiberian.
steve
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system user wrote:

Tiberius
--
Gary Bolles
NAR 82636
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wrote:

I was foreced to add 5% and I am NOT happy about it!
--
Jerry Irvine, Box 1242, Claremont, California 91711 USA
Opinion, the whole thing. <mail to: snipped-for-privacy@gte.net>
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Gary wrote:

How about...
"Why can't Superman leap tall buildings with a single bound?"
"Because they're infinitely tall!"
- Robert Galejs (just over 30%)
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Had a PDP-11/03, 11/08, 11/34, and 11/35.

D20, and one of the best neuton moderators

Florence flask has a spherical body, and a Erlenmeyer is conical.

Photo-electric effect. A process where electrons can be ejected or "moved" from the surface of a material by by the action of light ot higher energy waves. It the basis for X-ray Photoelecton Spectroscopy(XPS)

Tiberious

My additions:
Still have your lab notebooks from college
Played Super Start Trek on a PDP-11 at the Commodore level and exceeded the capability of the program.
Know the difference between a RK, RL-01, and RL-02 drive.
Know what a "dollar" is in reactor terminology
Know what a delayed neutron is and why it is important.
Enjoy performing prompt criticality experiments
Know what Cherinkov radiation is
Completed a DD-298 form and realized what a nerd you are by the responses.
John
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How many points for having Star Trek on a Vectrex? ; )
Randy
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