OT - Re-Partioning Hard-disks

To all who know what they are doing -
I just thought this would be the best place to ask.
I have my hard disk partioned into C,D, & E and have Win2000 on C,
Other Aplications on D, and Data on E.
When I set up the system 3 years ago ( blimey - time flies) I allocated 4Gb to C & D and this was fine at the time.
However, with Sw new install and other software, my C partion is now very full !!! only a few Mb left and I dare not tinker too much by throwing away files.!!
My E partion has plenty of space left so the question is -
Is there a way with Windows 2000 of taking space from the E partition and giving it to the C & D partitions, without having to scrap everything and reformat?
Any advice would be appreciated.
Regards
Jonathan Stedman
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I have run into the same problem. I had to use Partition Magic to resize C, D, and E to get SW to fit on both W2k and XP systems. Windows installer is a big disk hog and this is part of the problem. With XP there are additional things going on that over time suck up disk space. I think MicroSoft is working with the single partition model when they design software.
To think I used to run SW 98+ and 99 on a 166Mhz system with a 1 GB hard drive with multiple partitions. And I don't see much performance gain today.
jjs wrote:

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Isn't that the truth! I think projects went much faster, in general, back then. I think if there was a Solidworks Lite that was approximately equivalent to the final sp's of sw2000, in terms of horsepower required and user speed and stability, it would be a great package for 90% of the users. I don't do organic shapes much, though.
Bill
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jjs wrote:

Why not just install sw on the E drive?
Mine's on my f drive.
There is a way to mount a directory of E on C, but I don't know how it functions. ie: it appears on C with a HD icon, not a folder icon, so I don't know if you can actually *fully* use it as a subdirectory of C.
IOW, it appears to work kind of like "mount --bind" but since I don't know that much about it, I have not used it. Didn't have time to google it either, so I just installed SW on E.
--nick e.
--
Really, I'm not out to destroy Microsoft. That will just be a completely
unintentional side effect.
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Nick E. wrote: ...snip

Because SW and especially Service Packs still use up sizable chunks of the C: drive with no way to redirect to other locations.

On XP RMB MyComputer and pick Management. Then go to disk management. This will show all your partitions. RMB on a partition and go to Change Drive Letter and Path. You can mount the logical partition to an empty folder on another partition ala` Unix. In fact you can mount the same partition on multiple folders. You can even do away with the drive letter for the mounted partition.
This is done in a similar manner on NT. ...snip
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kellnerp wrote:

really?
I'll have to check that when I get back to work. I realize the AppData is still going to be there, but if the main program takes up the most space (it does, doesn't it) then intstalling it on a different drive should help.
Personally, I install everything on E:\progra~1. SW2004 just happened to end up on the F drive because E still had SW2001+ on it, and there wasn't enough room for 04 on E with the old version there.
--nick e.
--
Really, I'm not out to destroy Microsoft. That will just be a completely
unintentional side effect.
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Use Partition Magic to resize the partitions as you need. Probably the easiest and safest way.
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Thank you every one for your advice - I'll have to get a copy of Partition Magic and then pray as its doing its job !! Like no power cuts, lightening strikes etc.
I have also had to load SW2004 on my E drive as 2003 and other stuff had had filled up my D drive.
TTFN
Regards
Jonathan Stedman

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I have a similar scheme AND similar problems.
As far as I know, Windows itself can't do the repartioning.
I purchased disk-partitioning software from Best Buy. I can't remember the name of the software at the moment. I've used it twice with no problems. Works fine.
When I get home tonight, I will post the name of the software.

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On 9 Jul 2004 07:21:16 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@liquidschwarz.com (TheTick) wrote:

One that I have used and was very successful was Partition Magic.
On this PC I had almost the exact same prob, the drive with XP on was full. What I have done, rather than buy partition magic, I have uninstalled some of the massive apps, then reinstalled them, but when the installer runs, instead of accepting" C:\program files\appfoldername" I change the C: to D: (or whatever) and the bulk of the application files are stored on another drive.
Works too.
But partition magic is the once and for all easy way...
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I'm not home yet, but kellnerp jogged my memory... Partition Magic

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Be *extremely* careful using old(er) versions of partition magic on NTFS partitions. The NTFS format was changed/updated and may not be supported by some versions. If memory serves me correctly, v5.0 of PM does NOT support with Win2K NTFS format, but PM 5.01 does.
In general, rewriting a partition to unreadable junk does NOT increase Operating System performance <grin>
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disks are so cheap, why not add one, and grow the C drive to take over the space of the D & E after the data is moved to the new physical disk. You can do that in the disk mgr. Your performance will be improved somewhat if the pagefile is put on a different physical drive. bill

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On Sat, 10 Jul 2004 17:50:52 GMT, "bill allemann"

Thanks Bill.
This is an alternative worth considering, apart from using partition magic that others have suggested, because you are right - hard disk are very cheap .
I already have another two small old drives added, but it had never crossed my mind to attempt to move existing partitions and software arnound. Can disk manager move 'application software' over to the other partitons on the other drives and also keep all the referances to the Registry correct, or will I have to re-install all my application software on my 'D' drive.
Ahh I think I've answered that question myself - if I still call the new place where the application software will reside - 'D', then it will work - Is this what you mean? The same with the 'E' drive where all my SW file reside. And we know how SW files are all interlinked. But while creating the new 'D' partion on another disk, there will be a moment when two 'D' partitions exist. Can this happen or will I be sucked into a black hole !! :-) and spanked for breaking the Microsoft laws of physics?
I can see I will have to read abit about what Disl manager can do.
Certainly food for thought.
Bill - Have you done this procedure yourself ?
And thank you everyone for your help and advice.
Regards
Jonathan Stedman

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