Fiberglass Instruction

I've covered a couple of airplanes with fiberglass but not really satisfied with the result. Does anyone know of a good instructional book, tape or
DVD?
Thanks,
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refer to : Alan's Hobby, Model & RC Web Links http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~atong /
"Fibreglass, Carbon, Resin Moulding & Casting Cowls, Spats,Canopies "
See also "Mold, Cast & Vacuum Form items yourself" sub section below. Composites Information Covering Models With Fibreglass Cloth by Jim Ryan Fibreglass or make your own FG hull Fibreglass Techniques & Information FibreGlast.Com How To Articles = Spars, Molds, Parts, Skins & U/C How To = Ironsidz Model Car Tech - Resin Casting etc. Molded fuselage pictures The Cheap Little Sucker - make a vacuum pump Vacuum Bagging Wings Water based Polyurethane skin glassing
and "Covering Materials & Instructions" regards Alan T Alan's Hobby, Model & RC Web Links http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~atong /

satisfied
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This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------030103000003070302080904 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes not so great) words of knowledge:

Here is a basic "How To" using 1/2 oz or 3/4 oz fiberglass cloth and polyurethane. This method has about 60% of the strength of a resin job, but only 1/2 the weight. It is SUBSTANTIALLY easier to sand and has the advantage of NO FUMES.
I am also enclosing a "How To" on painting with latex if you are interested.
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     Glassing with Water Base Polyurethane
1. Sand the model with 220 grit and remove any highs/lows you may find. Fill as needed with lightweight filler and sand.
2. Give the wood 1 thin - medium coat of wood sealer. I use the commercial stuff. What this does is twofold - it stops the balsa from soaking up too much of the poly and at the same time protects the balsa from the water in the polyurethane.
3. When dry, sand lightly with 220 to remove the "fuzzies".
4. Some people say to apply a light coat of 3M #77 adhesive to the wood at this point. I have found that this is more trouble than it is worth since if you have a wrinkle, the complete piece of fiberglass has to be removed to straighten it out.
I prefer to lay the fiberglass cloth on the part/area to be covered and smooth it out using a SOFT brush. Brush FROM THE CENTER TOWARDS THE EDGES. The static electricity usually holds it in place. I normally use 1/2 oz (.5 oz) or 3/4 oz (.75 oz) fiberglass cloth.
5. Using WATER BASE polyurethane and a FOAM brush, start at the center and brush towards the edges of the fiberglass. All you want to do is stick the fiberglass to the balsa, so excessive amounts are not needed. Any additional pieces of fiberglass should overlap each other about 1/2 - 3/4 inches.
Let this dry. DO NOT SAND !!
Brush on another coat of polyurethane. This coat can be a little heavier.
Let this coat dry. DO NOT SAND !!
6. Mix up some polyurethane and microballoons. I use 1 part microballoons to about 5 parts polyurethane. This will be on the thick side.
Brush on a medium coat of this mixture and let dry.
7. Wet sand this with 220 or 320 grit paper. BE CAREFUL, AS YOU CAN VERY EASILY SAND RIGHT THROUGH THE FIBERGLASS.
8. Check the fiberglass carefully to insure the weave is filled. If the weave is not completely filled, repeat step 6 and 7.
9. SPRAY a coat of water base polyurethane on the plane and let dry. DO NOT SAND !!
10. Spray a THIN coat of primer on the plane. When this is COMPLETELY dry, block wet sand with 220 or 320 grit as much of the plane as possible to highlight any highs/lows you may have missed during your sanding/prep. The areas that can not be block sanded, CAREFULLY sand by hand. (TIP: CA some of the wife's/girlfriends fingernail file boards together. Wrap the sandpaper around them so you can block sand in tight areas. The CA helps prevent the boards from disintergrating in the water) Fill any low areas with a lightweight filler and sand when dry. Apply a THIN coat of polyurethane to these areas.
When the poly is dry, repeat this step until you are satisfied that all the highs/lows are removed.
11. SPRAY a thin coat of polyurethane on the plane. When dry, spray the primer.
12. When the primer is dry, you can apply your rivets, panel lines and other detailing desired.
13. Now you can spray your paint.
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                Painting with Latex
First, if you have not done so, I strongly recommend you read the article by Roy Vallencourt on using latex paint. http://www.modelairplanenews.com/how_to/latex1.asp
I do disagree with Mr. Vallencourt in a couple of areas. These areas of disagreement are based on my personal experience using latex.
1. I add 1 1/2 caps of FloTrol per quart of latex paint PRIOR to any diluting. The Flotrol retards the drying slightly and allows the paint to level itself.
2. Use ONLY water for thinning the paint. My experience has shown that using windshield washer fluid gives a slight tint to light colors.
3. My best results with latex have been between 25 psi and 30 psi. Under 25 psi I don't get the coverage I would like and over 30 psi the paint starts to have a "dimpled" appearance.
4. I have not had good luck using a heat gun to promote quicker drying. I know of several people who have had good luck using this technique though. You can try it and see if it works for you or not.
5. I strongly suggest and highly recommend the blue 3M brand of masking tape. What you want is the "60 Day Safe Release". This can be identified by a paper appearance to the tape and on the side of the wrapping is an adhesive index. You want a 2 dot adhesive rating. The 2 dot adheres reasonably well, yet will not pull up even fresh underlying paint.
6. Flat latex will take an average of 7 - 10 days to "cure". Semi gloss and gloss latex take 14 - 21 days to cure. To see if the paint is cured, press your finger firmly on a hard area of the plane (I use the cowl area). If a fingerprint remains, the paint is not cured. The fingerprint will disappear in a day or two.
7. Gasoline powered planes will be fine with the paint as is. Glow engine powered planes need to be clear coated. I suggest waiting until the latex is cured before clear coating.
For clear coating I suggest one or 2 sprayed coats of a water base polyurethane. My personal experience has shown that it is fuel RESISTANT to 10% nitro and various reports indicate no problems with 15% nitro. By fuel resistant, I mean if you let the clear coat dry for a minimum of a week before exposing it to fuel AND you clean your planes at the end of the day,you should have no problems. If you let the residue sit overnight on the plane, it will become sticky. If you want fuel proof, use Ultracote or Lusterkote clear. Oil Base polyurethane is also fuel proof, but it will start yellowing in about 6 - 8 months. The yellowing is not that noticable on dark colors, but very noticeable on light colors. --------------030103000003070302080904--
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Great info but I'm confused about the wood sealer...the 'commercial stuff' as you call it. Are you talking about laquer, enamel, water based...? ? ?

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Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes not so great) words of knowledge:

snip
Just plain old sanding sealer. The purpose of it is to seal the wood to minimize absorption of a finish coat of paint/varnish/polyurethane/etc.
Around here it is usually referred to as wood sealer. The can I grabbed happened to be MinWax brand, but there are other brands also. (a 1 quart can is going to last me for AWHILE on 60 size planes :-) )
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