Best way to un-weld pipe?


I've got an old fence I want to salvage some pipe from. It's a two
rail fence made out of 2 3/8 drill pipe. I've cut the top rail off of
the uprights, but I'm left with a short stub of pipe welded on every
12 feet. I need to cut those off.
I can do it with a cutoff wheel and a grinder, but it takes a while.
Anybody got a good way to get these off pretty fast? It doesn't have
to be that pretty.
Thanks!
Reply to
Sparks
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You could get most of it off quite quickly with a plasma cutter or O/A torch. If you aren't scared of warping, you can try a flushing tip on your torch. If you have an arc gouging gun, you could also scarf off the welds, that's quick and dirty.
Grant
Reply to
Grant Erwin
You used to scarf those off with a big Gas Axe with a curved tip, so the cutting oxygen jet was parallel to the surface. Hit the Oxygen lever, and the offending material starts to disappear at a rapid rate, and rather neatly if you had the technique down.
I watched a Maestro clean up the old weld from the baseplate of a light post, and then we chopped off the bottom three inches of the post where it rusted out and welded it back together again. (I putz around, but when it's structural work I let someone who welds all day and has the certs to prove it do the work.) And lots of Zinc Rich Primer before painting.
Wonder if they make curved tips for plasma cutters...? (Miller says to use the "extended" or "gouge" tips.)
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
Portable bandsaw will remove most of it. Just stay flush or you will start cutting into the salvaged piece rather than the stub. Fast and fairly quiet. No sparks.
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Reply to
Tom Kendrick
Thanks! I tried the sawzall. It works, but takes a while. And it eats up the blades pretty fast. The pipe is about 3/16 wall thickness.
I don't have enough experience with a torch to not burn through the pipe I'm trying to save. :-/
Reply to
Sparks
Not sure how that metallurgical mix would react to mechanical cutting. Were it me, I'd just take a cutting torch to it. Realize you will probably have some blowback from scale on the inside of the wall, and cut it at an angle rather than 90 deg. to the pipe. At an axis parallel to a line drawn through the center. That way, you will just bounce off the scale, and actually get a prettier cut. Watch out for the drops. That stuff is heavy. I used to work on oil rigs.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
Pipe cutter - Chain wraparound and a long bar on the pipe cutter. Martin Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member.
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Doug Miller wrote:
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Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
Now that I look, yes! In fact, they are labeled "The Torch" :-) It's not a Milwaukee saw, though.
I'd be interested in any tricks to keep the blade from overheating (other than "wait";) that seems to be what does them in.
Reply to
Sparks
That would be some kind of coolant. I recently discovered a spray can product made by Union Butterfield which works great and is very portable. It's basically a drilling fluid but it would work fine for keeping a sawzall blade cool too.
I think you should try cutting this with a torch. You might nick the parent pipe a little, but you will rapidly learn and gain confidence. It should be an order of magnitude faster than a sawzall.
Grant
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Yeah, that chain pipe cutter will pop the post off the top rail real fast and leave a nice square clean cut - but that still leaves the "fishmouth" of the vertical post welded to the top rail pipe.
He's trying to cut that fishmouth and weld off, and either a plasma cutter or oxy-acetylene cutting torch is the tool for the job. The choice depends on what you have available or the budget for.
Angle grinder for cleanup, and a stick, wirefeed or MIG welding torch to fill in the inevitable divots. Then hit it again with the grinder.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
Graduate school is learning to cut one exhaust pipe from the inside of a larger one that its a press fit into, and has been clamped for years.
Man, that's a lifesaver now and then!
Dave
Reply to
spamTHISbrp
If you don't have the torch and you do have the sawzall, a decent inverter and your pickup or car will work out fine. I've had best results with cutting steel with sawzalls if I drip a bit of oil into the cut. My brother the electrican put a 2KW inverter in his service truck to avoid having to bring his 5kw generator out to the job site. Uncle has a 1.5KW inverter with anderson powerpole connectors so he can connect to his truck battery to run the elevation motor on our band mill.
I'm a wimp, only have a 300 watt in my car connected by cigaratte lighter socket to run camera, laptop, and battery chargers on trips. Figure out what your saw needs and double it for startup as a minimum
Wes
-- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes
I thought this hater of fine oil pipe had cut the top into lots of short length pipe. Leaving the T on the post.
Best way is to put it into a long lathe and turn it down. :-)
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member.
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Bruce L. Bergman wrote:
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Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
My gut reaction is that this will not work in a lathe. I think it will only work if this is a very stiff pipe (think short pipe) and you turn it down very slowly to avoid the tool jamming against the protrusion.
Best wishes,
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
What's that Lassie? You say that Sparks fell down the old rec.crafts.metalworking mine and will die if we don't mount a rescue by Sat, 09 Aug 2008 02:13:24 GMT:
What kind of blades did you use. I have been cutting up some scrap channel and tube, and have found that the milwaukee blades called " the torch" are way better than the "metal cutting" blades.
Reply to
dan

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