Removing Oil from Soaked Balsa

Good Morning. I recently purchased a used trainer, and I noticed that
the MonoKote wasn't adhering to the bottom of the front of the fuselage
(beneath the engine bay). I peeled the MonoKote off from this area, and
noticed that the whole bottom of the front was soaked in oil! I figure
I will need to remove the oil from the wood before I can recoat this
area, but I'm not sure how to do that. Any ideas?
Thanks,
Harry Sanchez ( snipped-for-privacy@jetlink.net)
Reply to
Harry Sanchez
Loading thread data ...
By a can of k2 fabric cleaner and spray it on the area (that's what I do), let it dry (it will turn white) and after a few hours, or overnight, brush it off.... repeat till satisfied. Corn starch (or gold bond) might do the same thing...
Arne
=====================
Reply to
Arne
Harry,
K2R Spot Remover is probably the de-oiler of choice. I've also done a DIY version of it by mixing a slurry of denatured alcohol and corn starch, applying it to the oily area, letting it dry, and either brushing or vacuuming it off. Some folks use kitty litter. Heat seems to help, too. I've tried to iron on some covering over oil-soaked wood and had the oil boil out of it. You can then wipe it off. BTW, K2R can be found in the cleaning supplies or laundry sections of grocery stores.
Morris
Morris
Reply to
Morris Lee
Corn starch (baby powder) mixed with alcohol into a paste then spread on the area. Brush off after it dries and repeat if necessary.
John VB
Reply to
jjvb
That's absolutely correct, it IS the best way to degrease balsa. However, it's called "K2R" in case you have trouble finding it as "k2". Also note the subtle difference between the product called "K2R" and a homebuilt aircraft called a "KR2". One removes spots, and the other creates spots (on the ground at the end of a high speed stall :-)
MJC
Reply to
MJC
FWIW,
Several years ago someone told me that "Fullers Earth" was the solid version of K2R and could be found at pool supply houses. Since then I have not had any need so the information may not be good.
Reply to
Six_O'Clock_High
Hay MJ , (hehe, rhyme intended)
Actually, it's "K2r" with a little "r". I happened to get out the can for another lister, last week. It's a spot remover for various fabrics. Can be hard to find.
Cheers,
CR
MJC wrote:
Reply to
Charles & Peggy Robinson
In addition to the K2r and corn starch remedies, you can also use an iron and paper towels in the same way you remove candle wax from fabric.
Fold the paper towels about four times, and iron it onto the oil-soaked wood. The heat will drive the oil out of the wood and the paper towels will do what they do best.
It's the quickest way to remove the most oil in a hurry, but K2r may be needed to get it all out.
Once you reach the point of diminishing returns, apply a coat of Balsarite (for film or fabric to suit your new covering) to the wood. The Balsarite is well-known for helping bond adhesive coverings to previously-oiled wood.
Cheers, Fred McClellan The House Of Balsa Dust
formatting link
Reply to
Fred McClellan
K2r Spot Lifter is the best. It's a little hard to fine, but you can get it here:
http://65.18.207.26/store/product1761.html And here's something that may work as well:
formatting link
Spontex's K2r Spot-Lifter $3.99 for five ounces; 800-652-2002
Reply to
Doug Dorton
My regimen for removing oil from soaked areas also included, in addition to the K2R, an infra-red heat lamp, like the kind used in fast food shops to keep sandwiches warm.
Of course, one has to be very careful with their use, but it does remove a lot more oil than just K2R alone. The heat lamp should be used first and paper towels should be used to sop up the oil that beads up on top of the wood.
I have used this combo several times and I have reclaimed some models that had everyone convinced that they should inhabit a landfill for eternity.
Again, be very careful with the heatlamp and do not leave it on unattended. It's use makes a HUGE difference in how much oil is extracted.
Ed Cregger
Reply to
Ed Cregger
Ed, I have always wondered if a short visit to the microwave might accomplish the same thing. I normally use a heat gun and towel as step one because I noticed that it did a better job than just the K2r. I also have learned how to cover in a manner that generally avoids oil soaking .
unattended.
Reply to
Six_O'Clock_High
I have thought about using a heat gun, but never got around to using it, because, like you, I learned to cover in such a manner as to preclude oil soaking.
I also learned that some coverings appear to have many fine holes in them that permits fuel to soak through even when properly applied. I avoid those coverings these days.
Nice typing to you again, Jim.
Ed Cregger
Reply to
Ed Cregger
Stick the front of the model in a bucket of kitty litter. Let it set for about a week. The kitty litter will pull the oil out of the wood . I tried it. It works. Ray
Doug Dort> K2r Spot Lifter is the best. It's a little hard to fine, but you can get it here:
Reply to
Marion & Ray
K2R works better if after a day or two you hit it with a heat gun. Greyhound
about a week. The kitty
Reply to
Grey-hound
I would like to thank everybody for their thoughtful ideas. I tried in vain to find K2r anywhere here in Ventura County, so I tried the cornstarch idea some of you suggested, and I was able to get most all of the oil out. The hobby shop I visited didn't have any Balsarite, but I did find a white paste called Balsaloc, which looked like it did the same thing. I applied it onto the affected area, let it dry a few hours, and then I was able to apply the MonoKote to the area. The MonoKote held. Now for the bad news: The Fledgling trainer is history. I spent nearly an hour today getting the engine tuned properly so I could fly it. However, right after I took off and made a right turn away from the pilot station, the plane went into a nasty spin and crashed! My initial assessment of the damage is a total loss of the airplane, since the fuselage is broken in so many different areas. The engine and radio may be damaged but both look repairable. Oh, well! Maybe better luck with another plane.
Again thanks to all, Harry Sanchez
Harry Sanchez wrote:
Reply to
Harry Sanchez
I was able to squeeze out two more students on my Fledgling by rubber banding a cut up beer can to the missing floor under the fuel tank. Looked like hell, but flew ok. It was about a pound heavier from when it was first finished by that point.
Reply to
John Alt
In the FWIW column, you might mention you're in California next time you post a query. Maybe save yourself some time looking for a product you won't be able to find.
Many items available in the other 49 states cannot be had in Kalifornia, and K2r is one of those products.
Cheers, Fred McClellan The House Of Balsa Dust
formatting link
Reply to
Fred McClellan

Site Timeline

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.