Old timey tempering formulas

I was reading in an old book how they would make varioius concoctions to temper springs in the old days. It would boil at just the right
temp to temper what ever they were making. So there must have been lots of formulas. Where I work we make small springs for patchboxes that go on muzzleloaders. We have been using a torch to harden and propane to temper but this is very timeconsuming. Is there somewhere that has a list of formulas that I can use to temper the various parts I now do with a torch. springs, chisles and who knows. I would like to possibly be as historiclly accurate as possible. Since we sell parts used to build historically accurate rifles and pistols from the 18th and 19th century. Almost all my experience is with modern machinery so I'm really new to all this. We are planning on building a forge in the near future Ken
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ken wrote:

Do some looking into the actual temperatures required, and look at the temperatures of various salt blueing solutions, molten sulphur baths, and the like. Or invest in a digital oven to do your heat treating.
I suspect that the historically accurate way to make these would be to harden and temper them in the same forge that they were made in. Not exactly a time efficient production method, if you are trying to keep ahead of demand. Personally, I would strive to provide a historically accurate looking part, with an UN-historically high level of consistant quality, by whatever means I could, and save the historically accurate production methods for the live demo's and the few customers willing to pay top (read, obscene) dollar for hand work.
Books... Check some of the "survivalist" booksellers (Paladin Press comes to mind, there are others) There are a pile of "Old Time" books being reprinted that cover formulae for just about anything that you might want. The downside of many of these is the use of chemicals that you will find quite difficult to get, or that you just don't want to have anywhere near you (molten cyanide crystals, anyone?)
Cheers Trevor Jones A fellow by the name of Kurt Saxon has his name on a pile of such books, and a websearch should find some more info.
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At gunsmithing school we tempered small gun springs using molten lead. Heat the lead until a drop of oil smokes without quite flashing off (about 550 DegF). This gives you hard spring temper A drop of motor oil should flash off around 650 degF, which gives you soft spring temper. Immerse the spring in the lead for a few minutes and remove.
We used surgical forceps to handle the springs.
The springs would come out of the lead a perfect even blue color.
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<snip>

<snip>
What prevents the lead from sticking to the steel like solder?
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On 15 Nov 2004 06:42:16 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Bruce Freeman) wrote:

Ever tried soldering steel with lead only and no flux ?
--
Smert' spamionam

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Andy Dingley wrote:

And to add to the trick, pure lead. Solders typically contain tin and silver to aid in amalgam. Martin
--
Martin Eastburn, Barbara Eastburn
@ home at Lion's Lair with our computer snipped-for-privacy@pacbell.net
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