3 phase Vrs 1 Phase Power

In terms of utility bill, would a three phase power cost more than a single phase? Considering all loads equal.

Reply to
Kissi Asiedu
Loading thread data ...

Energy is energy. So it should cost the utility the same at the generator. Three phase motors are somewhat more efficient, so they will cost you somewhat less to run. But, until recently, having a three phase motor (or other load) meant having a three phase service (more service equipment, more expensive) and the utility will have to provide three phase lines to the customer (higher capital costs).

Recently, with the advent of cheap solid state controls, it has become possible to build appliances with three phase motors, driven by variable frequency drives, supplied by a single phase supply. So now we can have the best of all worlds.

Reply to
Paul Hovnanian P.E.

It depends on too many things to say. In my area three phase is not even an option for residences but you can get it in some agricultural communities and I've heard that in parts of Europe residential 3 phase is common. Here you only find it in commercial and industrial sites.

Three phase requires more complex gear to supply but the rate structure is up to the utility.

Reply to
James Sweet

There is somewhat additional investment in providing three phase. Single phase motors will not be as efficient as three phase motors. In small installation, it is probably simple and cheaper to just use single phase motor, especially for units under one horsepower.

Bill

Reply to
Salmon Egg

An Edison system already has three full sized conductors. One more conductor, is all that is necessary for three phase.

Bill

Reply to
Salmon Egg

It is true that in Europe residential 3 phase is common. It is common for example in Norhern Europe. I live in Finland and here residential 3 phase is very common, the default on any new installation.

Reply to
Tomi Holger Engdahl

One more conductor means two additional windings on the transformer, sometimes two entire transformers, a more complex meter, more bus bars in the service panel, one more pole on all the breakers. It's quite a bit more complex.

Reply to
James Sweet

Each EU country seems to have a single phase limit, i.e. the max current you are allowed on a single phase supply before you have to take a 3-phase supply (for which there is no limit).

In the UK, the single phase limit is 100A, which is enough for most homes, so 3-phase into the home isn't very common. You can ask for it though as it runs past in the street, and it will be forced on you if you would otherwise need to upgrade a single phase supply above 100A. In some other EU countries, the single phase limit is as low as 20A, in which case just about everyone has a 3-phase supply.

Reply to
Andrew Gabriel

Standard service in North America is 200A 240V split single phase. Larger houses occasionally have 400A with twin panels, particularly if they were built in an area without natural gas for heat, and I've seen as large as 600A with 3 panels in a very large house, all of that single phase. It would be nice if 3 phase were standard but at least now inverter drives for motors have become so cheap that we can have most of the advantages of 3 phase power regardless of what comes into the place.

Reply to
James Sweet

----- And miss all that comes in between birth and old age (where I am now)?

Your probable estimate is right. The economics involved, along with the history of supply development as well as mass manufacturing has meant that fractional single phase HP motors are cheaper than 3 phase motors. Try buying a 3 phase 1/4HP motor. If you can find it, it will be more expensive than a single phase equivalent

Reply to
<dhky

For comparision in Finland the standard for normal house or bigger aparment seems to be 3x25A. The three phase voltage here is 230/400V (230V from neutral to phase, 400V between phases).

Reply to
Tomi Holger Engdahl

I couldn't find a 1/4HP, but I've bought two 1/3HP 3 phase motors recently and they were dirt cheap, of course they were surplus.

I suspect fractional HP 3 phase motors will get a lot more common over the next decade or so as the inverters to drive them from single phase have become so cheap and are getting cheaper still all the time.

Reply to
James Sweet

Are all three phases available for loads like motors, or are the branch circuits just one phase? It's always interesting to see how this stuff is done in other places, a friend in England sent me a bunch of pictures of the electrical system in his house and I was surprised to see how different it is from what we do here.

Reply to
James Sweet

The flip side of that is the computer industry used to use a lot of fractional HP 3 phase motors (probably where yours came from) and now they don't so it may actually make them get harder to find.

Reply to
gfretwell

I doubt they'll get too hard to find, they're showing up in consumer white goods now. The biggest competition they have is the permanent magnet brushless motor, another 3 phase machine that can be used in similar applications. Switched reluctance motors are also fairly common, harder to drive but as with the others, the electronics keep getting better and cheaper.

Reply to
James Sweet

------------------------------- That may be but it is likely just as economical to go to brushless DC in this range as is the case with many applications that now exist- electronics no more expensive- possibly cheaper in that there is no need for frequency dependent voltage control and likely little difference in manufacturing costs. The comparison that would then be valid is that between brushless DC and inverter driven induction machines in terms of performance and cost.

Interesting times. Cheers,

Reply to
<dhky

True, although despite the name, brushless DC motors are really permanent magnet 3 phase AC motors, the inverters that drive them are very similar to those for AC induction motors.

If I had to guess, I'd say that BLDC will gain traction in the fractional HP sizes and 3 phase induction will remain common in larger sizes, with some overlap for specific applications. I expect single phase induction motors to start to go away.

Reply to
James Sweet

The three phases go the the main distribution panel. Then branch circuits are wired from that as needed. Normally there are three phase branch circuits and single phase branch circuits. Three phase branch circuits are used for heavy loads (stove, sauna, water heater) and motor loads (more common in industrial applications than homes). Single phase branch circuits are the most common for most normal uses like normal electrical outlets, lights etc...

Reply to
Tomi Holger Engdahl

Oh, you can get three phases in just about ALL "communities." At least along the major roads or wherever the power company locates its feeders.

Likewise, 3 phases are available for half or so of most important roads.

But the "side roads" only have 3 phases until the next road branch. Then, typically, 2 phases go down the more important branch, and one phase goes down the spur.

The same thing is true is more suburban communities and even the distribution system is moderate density cities. LARGE apartment buildings often have 3 phases with each unit getting 2 phases (120/208 service). "Garden" apartments typically get a single phase for each section (120/240 service.)

Important/large new developments (hospitals, larger schools, shopping centers) can justify new 3 phase wiring to the location regardless of the prior situation.

The utility business is separating the power generation business from the distribution business. Even some of the distribtion business is separated with one company running the really high voltage ties and another handlilng lower voltage distribution.

Any particular "utility" company is likely moving toward not owning both power and distribution in the same market area. It makes it easier to negotiate rates.

But where two distribution companies interchange or power generation companies meet distribution companies, everyone in the deal perfers nicely "balanced" loads. Thus, there is a push to get larger customers to present a balanced load so that the utility doesn't have to mix and match customers to what phases they are connnected to and in what order.

Reply to
John Gilmer

In the area where I live, almost everyone lives on "side roads" that branch off the main arterial, nobody wants their driveway to connect to a busy through-way. Houses are clustered in these neighborhoods, each of which is supplied by a single phase branching off down at the main road. I've never seen or heard of a residential 3 phase installation here.

That is common, the apartment complexes are downtown where everything else is 3 phase too. The single family homes are in the hills and valleys surrounding and between towns.

Reply to
James Sweet

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.