Allow clocks to get their time from cellphones

Could wall clocks and car clocks be built with a receiver that would accept the current time from a cell phone?
Could the correct time be broadcast from the cellphone each time it is
used to allow devices with an internal clock to sync with them?
I see no reason why a cellphone could not continually transmit the correct time. The extra circuitry would cost about 25 cents.
Anyone think this would be a practical idea?
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Metspitzer wrote:

Take a look at http://www.circuitcellar.com/magazine/ issue #258 January 2012.
Similar idea, but it retransmits the time from a GPS receiver.
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Paul Hovnanian mailto: snipped-for-privacy@Hovnanian.com
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You can buy "always accurate 'atomic' clocks" that get a signal from WWVB, the time source that comes from atomic clocks. These days, you can also get clocks synched to GPS satellites.
Both are more accurate than cell phone towers (which, at best, synch to one of these signals).
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As others have pointed out, there are better solutions technically. Then there is the economic aspect. Do you really want to pay VZW $70/mo. to keep your clock set? ;-)
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On Sun, 08 Jan 2012 17:24:52 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

What is was really shooting for are small items that don't necessarily need "balls on" accurate time, but having the correct day and hour would be useful without having to manually set them.
Stuff like answering machines, microwaves, coffee makers, portable cameras or a wrist watches.
I would think it would be 0 cost for cellphones to send out the time on a regular basis and anything needing the current time could be modified to acquire the time for a very low cost.
I know there are other ways, but seems like a 0 cost way.
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WWVB is free, except for the circuitry to receive it.
GPS is free, except for the circuitry to receive it.
Cell signals are unlikely to be free, plus the cost of circuitry to receive it.
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So why not WWVB, as is intended?

Cell companies don't give their services away, if you hadn't noticed.

The other ways are the zero cost ways. You're trying to make it expensive.
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On Sun, 08 Jan 2012 21:02:37 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

I don't know, but there are many things that don't use it.
My coffee pot and my microwave never have the correct time. Could they get the time from WWVB? Yes? Do they? No
Would it be practical to use a small local signal coming from a cellphone? Maybe.
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What a moronic statement. Of course there are "things" that don't even have a clock.

Do you have a point?

Practical, sure. Expensive, you bet your a$$. Why pay for cell service when both WWVB and GPS are free?
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Metspitzer wrote:

Why not do it the right way?
http://www.nist.gov/pml/div688/grp40/its.cfm
I have a clock that uses the low frequency NIST signals to synchronize itself once a day with the atomic time base. It cost less than $20 and has a projector to show the time on the ceiling at night.
--
Virg Wall

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