House Wiring AWG Gage For Code Compliance ?

Hello,
I read somewhere recently that the (new) National Electrical Code mandates NM WG 12 gage for all new indoor house wiring. Was always 14 gage in the past, of course for the
typical 15 amp outlet, etc., runs.
Is it true that it is now AWG 12 for "everything" indoors to be Code compliant ?
Thanks, Bob
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wrote:

Not true at all. Some local yahoos have done that but not NFPA
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| I read somewhere recently that the (new) National Electrical Code mandates | NM WG 12 gage for all | new indoor house wiring. Was always 14 gage in the past, of course for the | typical 15 amp outlet, etc., runs. | | Is it true that it is now AWG 12 for "everything" indoors to be Code | compliant ?
I've not heard of such a thing.
That would have been the size for aluminum. But we are past that idiocy.
Many circuits now are required to be 20 amp instead of 15 amp, so those would need that wire size, anyway. Some AHJs may require everything else to be 20 amp as well. Where are you located?
Some AHJs require MC instead of NM. Chicago is one of them.
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|---------------------------------------/----------------------------------|
| Phil Howard KA9WGN (ka9wgn.ham.org) / Do not send to the address below |
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snipped-for-privacy@ipal.net wrote:

Not only the city itself, but most of the suburbs also. Funny thing, though, you can go to Home Depot and buy rolls of NM, so I am sure many do-it-yourselfers are using it anyhow.
Ben Miller
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Robert11 wrote:

Nope. I don't know what you read, but it is not true. 14 AWG is acceptable for a 15A circuit. There are, however, specific cases where the Code requires 20A circuits, and therefore 12AWG. Maybe that is what it was talking about.
Ben Miller
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Benjamin D Miller, PE
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wrote:

Actually there were some local AHJs who went on a 12 ga only binge for a while. The area up around Orlando was that way until the state put a stop to local addendums to the NEC (and other codes). Now there is a state wide building code. It sure makes it easier to build than when every little municipality had different rules. Now if they could just get some agreement from inspectors about what the NEC really says.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

Building inspectors seem to be like HOA board members; each thinks he rules the world. I had one that cost me a couple of thousand on a garage twenty or so years ago. Every time I went to the lumber yard to order stuff they'd ask "where the &*$% do you live?". I'd tell them and they'd reply, "should have known". The stovebolt never passed the inspectors test either.
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Keith

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