how do lifts work / stop working?

Paul Hovnanian P.E. wrote:

Basement, Ground, 1, 2, 3. Five levels, four rises between them. I haven't been to the Science Museum for several years, it's not what it used to be, but I do remember looking at these pistons, and not being able to see a joint in them. Most of the lifts of this type that I see link just two or three levels. I've never seen a telescoping one, but it would make sense. I've seen telescoping hydraulic rams used for other purposes.
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snipped-for-privacy@mail.croydon.ac.uk says...

I've also seen them in hotels with atriums. IIRC the Embassy Suites in Bloomington MN was eight stories. At the time ('80s) that the elevators were piston driven; thinking "that's quite some hole".
--
Keith

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komodore comrade wrote:

Because they incorporate numerous redundant safety systems. The preferred failure mode of any of these is to stop the system (rather than drop it to the bottom of the shaft). So, anything that fails or goes out of calibration usually results in the system stopping.

Because stopping at a floor isn't really considered 'getting stuck'.

Not really. But we did have an incident where an elevator stopped above one floor, the occupants pried the doors open and jumped down to the floor. One of them lost his balance and fell back into the shaft beneath the cab and was killed.
--
Paul Hovnanian mailto: snipped-for-privacy@Hovnanian.com
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