Re: detection gold on human body

I'm interested in finding a way to detect gold (nuggets or dust)
> attached or hidden on a person's body.
>
> Possible directions: reflections of the gold in different spectrums,
> thermal imaging, resonance frequency, MRI etc.
>
> Ofcourse, the detection process must not cause any damage to the > person examined.
>
> Prefferably, the detection method must be quick.
>
> Thanks.
Dangerous and unreliable: false accusations will flourish, because of
spurious contaminations (by Au, but also by Cu, Ag, Sb, Pt, Pb, Bi,
Hg,..., depending on the spectral instruments used). A not-so-far-fetched
example could be the use of Sb2S3 (kool) as eye lining by oriental women
(and several others, for that matter). Or the use of Precious Metal for
piercings at (un)expected places of the body.
J.J.
Reply to
jacques jedwab
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Why mess about with all that fancy magic-angle stuff? Just keep the field static at 5 or 6 Tesla and ping the subject with a good square GW pulse of a terahertz or so, then FFT out the echoes as they decay; like ringing a bell to see what it's made of. So you melt a few piercings and gold fillings; as long as we're dunking witches, let's do it right!
Mark L. Fergerson
Reply to
Mark Fergerson
: > Uncle Al wrote: : > : >>angel wrote: : >> : >>>I'm interested in finding a way to detect gold (nuggets or dust) : >>>attached or hidden on a person's body. : >> : >>Au-197 magnetic resonance imaging. A 14.092 kG magnet resonates : >>protons at 60 MHz and gold at 1.0276 MHz. Low frequency is bad. At : >>constant field/swept frequency it has .0026% the sensitivity of proton : >>MRI - that is really crappy itself. At constant frequency/swept field : >>it has 8.6% the sensitivity of proton MRI. : > : > : > Won't work. It's a quadrupolar nucleus, and the signals are to broad to : > be detectable. Besides, spinning the subject up to 5kHz or so would make : > him dizzy. :)
: Why mess about with all that fancy magic-angle stuff? : Just keep the field static at 5 or 6 Tesla and ping the : subject with a good square GW pulse of a terahertz or so, : then FFT out the echoes as they decay; like ringing a bell : to see what it's made of. So you melt a few piercings and : gold fillings; as long as we're dunking witches, let's do it : right!
Naw, just dissolve them in HNO3. If it doesn't dissolve, it might be gold.
-- -- William "Dave" Thweatt Robert E. Welch Postdoctoral Fellow Chemistry Department Rice University Houston, TX snipped-for-privacy@ruf.rice.edu snipped-for-privacy@us.army.mil
Reply to
William David Thweatt
Name it, trolling boring moron, and provide a reference.
-- Uncle Al
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(Do something naughty to physics)
Reply to
Uncle Al
First, I can show that copper is in the human body.
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Since Gold is in the same period as Copper, I don't doubt that the human body contains a variable, trace quantity of gold if, for instance, the water they drink contained a small amount of it.
Furthermore, it IS a fact that elements from the same period can replace other elements in the human body, and in most animals. This is why certain radioactive elements, once ingested, are so dangerous: They persist in the human body, and are not cleaned out.
So, it's only reasonable to assume that there are trace amounts of gold in the human body, though not in any regular percentage, as I had seemed to make out to be the case earlier.
The reason I originally thought there was gold is because in a HS chemistry textbook or some other HS book I saw it listed amongst the elements in the human body.
However, now I do have proof that at least copper is in there, and since copper and gold are in the same period, it isn't unreasonable to think that some people might have a bit of gold in them, since elements from the same period tend to react similar to eachother.
(...Starblade Riven Darksquall...)
Reply to
Starblade Darksquall
Will you also afirm that the human body contains Astatine? Francium?
Man, *you* are not reasonable (and you are an inch from pseudoscience, will you try to sell "gold pills" for the people in this newsgroup, New Age fellow?)
"Starblade Darksquall" escreveu na mensagem news: snipped-for-privacy@posting.google.com...
Reply to
João Antonio
So what are we talking about here? Gold in quantity as in a theft from a gold mine? In Africa they do this by pointing a really really big gun at the persons head and another guy with a rubber glove takes care of the other end.
jacques jedwab wrote:
Reply to
rsymes
The fact that gold is not listed as a trace element means the page is in error, as it is in fact a trace element. In experiments which artificially deprived subjects of gold and silver traces from their diet, it was found that although no serious health effects ensued, the subjects generally reported a feeling of uneasiness.
Reply to
Anthony Q. Bachler
P.S. the site also failed to list Uranium as a trace element, and we do in fact contain trace amounts of it. In fact extremely small amounts of it may be useful in maintaining normal kidney function (dont swallow an A-Bomb, we get more than enough from natural foods).
Reply to
Anthony Q. Bachler
Your ideas are so thin, you are not worthy text editing...
"Starblade Darksquall" escreveu na mensagem news: snipped-for-privacy@posting.google.com...
Reply to
João Antonio
Another way is to dunk them briefly into nitric acid. Most of them will dissolve, but the gold nuggets won't.
You can also use hydrochloric acid, but make sure you don't use a combination, otherwise the gold will dissolve too.
I worked in a mine in South Africa some time back, and whenever there was a 'leak', one of the diggers would be dunked in a tank. It certainly acted as a prevention. They never got me though. I payed my dues and got away twice.
Roland
Reply to
Roland Paterson-Jones
Agreed, hence the ability to use trace elements in teeth to determine where someone grew up. But how did we get from gold on a body to gold in it?
Z
Reply to
KC Armstrong
Indeed you are what you eat and although gold may not be a requirement for human health it is nonetheless present in certain plants. Mustard in particular has the ability to take up gold from the soil by virtue of the organic thiocyanates it naturally contains. There are patents on the use of this ability for commercial gold recovery. Thus if you ingest mustard or some other related plants, some gold may enter into your body. How long will it stay there? Consider lead. Another metal of no particular use in the human body and yet it DOES accumulate. Gold is just another heavy metal like lead. Certainly it behaves different chemically but it is still a poisonous metal and CAN accumulate in the body. Granted gold poisoning is very very rare but it has happened although not by excessive consumption of mustard. That would probably result in death by asphixiation in your own flatulence. Nevertheless, gold can enter the human body and be accumulated regardless as to whether it has any biological use therein.
Roland Paters> "The Ghost In The Machine" wrote in
Reply to
rsymes
: >
: > > I'm interested in finding a way to detect gold (nuggets or dust) : > > attached or hidden on a person's body. : > > : > > Possible directions: reflections of the gold in different spectrums, : > > thermal imaging, resonance frequency, MRI etc. : > > : > > Ofcourse, the detection process must not cause any damage to the : > > person examined. : > > : > > Prefferably, the detection method must be quick. : > > : > > Thanks. : > : > A person's body is made up of a certain percentage of gold. : > : > (...Starblade Riven Darksquall...)
: Name it, trolling boring moron, and provide a reference.
Geeze, Al. I've got a couple grams in my mouth...
-- -- William "Dave" Thweatt Robert E. Welch Postdoctoral Fellow Chemistry Department Rice University Houston, TX snipped-for-privacy@ruf.rice.edu snipped-for-privacy@us.army.mil
Reply to
William David Thweatt
: > : > Are you trying to find out whether your employees are stealing from you?
: yes
Why not strip search them? If you hired only females fresh out of college (university in the UK), you would not have a problem finding a volunteer to do the search.
-- -- William "Dave" Thweatt Robert E. Welch Postdoctoral Fellow Chemistry Department Rice University Houston, TX snipped-for-privacy@ruf.rice.edu snipped-for-privacy@us.army.mil
Reply to
William David Thweatt

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