Re: detection gold on human body

: > > > I'm interested in finding a way to detect gold (nuggets or dust) : > > > attached or hidden on a person's body. : > > > : > > > Possible directions: reflections of the gold in different spectrums, : > > > thermal imaging, resonance frequency, MRI etc. : > > > : > > > Ofcourse, the detection process must not cause any damage to the : > > > person examined. : > > > : > > > Prefferably, the detection method must be quick. : > > > : > > > Thanks. : > > : > > Are you trying to find out whether your employees are stealing from you? : > : > yes
: Another way is to dunk them briefly into nitric acid. Most of them will : dissolve, but the gold nuggets won't.
Platinum won't dissolve either. The same with many silicates, saturated organic fluorides (e.g. PTFE), and some other stuff. That's why when I suggested this course of action, I said that what doesn't dissolve "might" be gold.
-- -- William "Dave" Thweatt Robert E. Welch Postdoctoral Fellow Chemistry Department Rice University Houston, TX snipped-for-privacy@ruf.rice.edu snipped-for-privacy@us.army.mil
Reply to
William David Thweatt
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precious metals plants often have a dual locker system for security ... one strips off work clothes (which are then laundered in house to recover the PM's) walks out of the secure locker room through a sensitive metal detector ( with a cloth robe on for modesty - or to stop showing off in my case :-) ) ... then to the "insecure" locker room where they get dressed in the clothes they bought ... We had no female hourly ... but in the executive side we did have a random strip search to go with the empty the pockets and pass through the detector ... and the executive (salaried) female employees had a female security guard to perform such ... I would jokingly go to her side when I got that red light ...
Be seeing you In the Village Number 6
Reply to
SNUMBER6
in article snipped-for-privacy@lexi2.athghostsuus.net, The Ghost In The Machine at snipped-for-privacy@sirius.athghostsuus.net wrote on 9/2/03 1:00 AM:
That is irrelevant to the state problem.
Bill
Reply to
Repeating Decimal
In sci.physics, Repeating Decimal
wrote on Tue, 02 Sep 2003 18:50:34 GMT :
This is true. It's just that if they're standing in the tub and having potassium cyanid sprayed on them, one has to assume that they'll (a) die, (b) fall down, and (c) mess up the measurement.
:-)
Reply to
The Ghost In The Machine
On Tue, 2 Sep 2003 22:28:59 -0300, "João Antonio" Gave us:
Would you do it, because top posting makes you look stupid?
It does. As it happens, it is a mere indicator of fact, in most cases.
Do some reading on usenet posting protocols. Don't be an outlook express usenet retard. Ooops... too late.
Reply to
DarkMatter
In which case, detecting gold *on* the body is likely to prove a futile exercise. Once your employees wise up, they will conceal purloined gold *in* their body. Cavity searches will not be enough, either. With Au being inert, the best concealment would be to have swallowed the metal. While nuggets of gold would show in x-rays, gold dust would disperse in the stomach contents, so may not be all that conspicuous. Subsequently, to recover the gold the thief would merely have to improvise a settling tank at his home, and stir its contents from time to time ...
Reply to
John Savage
On 26 Aug 2003 07:24:47 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.co.il (angel) scribed these bits:
Can dogs smell gold, or be trained to recognise it. If they could have a sniffer dog sniff it out.
Another method may be to have a sting operation to buy the gold back, and see who is trapped.
X X X X X
Reply to
Octa Ex
Angel, I have been thinking this over, waiting to see what others say about this. sadly, I have yet to see anyone hit the core of the problem. If they have, I must have missed it.
It's called trust. If you have a mine that does not have men you can trust, it doesn't matter how rich the ore is. Eventually the lack of trust will literally nickle and dime your company to death. There can never be 100% trust and there can never be 100% honesty. That's life. You just need to make sure the men and women you have working for you have some kind of reliability.
This can be remedied by hiring managers and supervisors that you KNOW you can trust. Not everyone is out to get rich at the risk of losing their job. Managers and supervisors especially. They have the years of experience you need behind your company and most likely certifications to prove it. If they screw up at your operation, that will be a heavy burden on them seeking employment elsewhere.
The drillers and the muckers and powder monkeys, they are a different sort. I have known a few of each, from my own experience in mining, mostly. And I have met a few that had experience, but you couldn't trust them with much of anything. By far the biggest cause is alcohol or drugs. Or, they just don't care. They were carefully weeded out by the supervisors as they had the know-how to separate the losers from the winners, so to speak.
Yes, it is wise to have some method to make it difficult for miners to "hi grade" the mine. One I encountered is exactly the opposite of what you want. You want to prevent it. One mine wanted to promote it.
There the rule was if you found some ore you wanted to keep, show it. So long as you showed it, odds are you could keep it. In some instances if they likesd the specimin, they'd offer you some cash for it. Not the market value, of course, but more like a finders fees. No, if they wanted it and you didn't want to give it up, you had no choice. After all, the ore and the mine is theirs, you're just doing the work. That mine, just a handfull of employees, was successful until the owner had a stroke. Not the only reason, but the biggest.
The theory that worked off of- and as far as I could see, it worked- is that if the miners get a percentage of the profits, as the ore they took home would be, the more effort is put into improving the production and quality of ore. And when a few rich streaks were hit, the guys that hit that streak got a really nice bonus.
Angel, if you can't trust or rely on anyone at your mine, it doesn't matter how rich that ore is. You must have good competant people working it. Otherwise it won't mean anything if you have stacks of gold bullion down there ready to be trucked off. It still has to come out of the mine.
And with that said, I realize that you may not be in mining. I suspect not as a competant professional mining engineer or a competant professional mine manager would know these things. But in any industry, the theory holds the same. Trash is still trash, you can't change that. But when you have good employees, they are, essentially, the proverbial Golden Goose. In any business you have four primary concerns- Customers, Product, Employees and Management. All three must be strong. 1. If you have a bad product, it doesn't matter if you have good employees, because the customers will soon go elsewhere. 2. If you have a good product but bad employees, your customers will soon grow tired of them and again, go elsewhere. 3. If you have a good product and bad management, good employees will be very hard to come by and therefor you'll have a high turnover rate resulting in #2. 4. If you have a good product, good employees and good managment, customers will be many. With the exception for market rates. If you have a good product that depends on the market, you might have a problem. Mining is a really good example.
In any case a reputation is soon created. Good reputations are what keep businesses going strong. Bad reputations are hard to fight, and they can be a serious downthrow to most any company.
No guarentee that will answer your questions, but I hope it helps you somehow. TM
-- Toadmonkey: "Now now. Brain popping and world crashing may be hazardous to ones perception of reality. Very dangerous business that can lead to madness or something worse for some, truth."
Remove "3+4" from addy before replying
Reply to
toadmonkey
how in the heck do you deprive a subject of gold and silver. How do you seperate it from the food?
artificially
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Reply to
Joe 123
On Tue, 09 Sep 2003 16:12:58 GMT, "Joe 123" Gave us:
No, dipshit... It IS STUPID!
Particularly when retards such as yourself fail to snip the previous post. You re-quote the entire post.
It isn't "more efficient", you retarded twit. It is more LAZY.
You don't fool anyone. You stupidity precedes you.
Reply to
DarkMatter
Dale Trynor wrote: Logic here would be that the food grown would be for example from a very pure hydroponics mix where such controles as the exclusion of all gold, silver would be possible.
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Reply to
Dale Trynor
In sci.physics, Joe 123
wrote on Tue, 09 Sep 2003 16:12:58 GMT :
[snip]
A: Yes. But given the current conventions of Usenet, why bother? *Q: Can one learn how to read backwards? **A: Because we read forwards. ***Q: Why isn't it more natural to read them backwards? ****A: Because one has to read them backwards. *****Q: Why does top posting make discussions hard to follow? ******A: It makes discussions hard to follow. *******Q: Why is top posting bad?
:-)
Reply to
The Ghost In The Machine
On Thu, 11 Sep 2003 18:32:09 GMT, "Joe 123" Gave us:
Said the utter retard that cannot figure out why top posting is stupid! Yer lucky I am not in Tampa anymore. I'd cover your house in dead animals for the gators to come get. Of course, they would mistake your lame ass for carrion. Good. We need to get rid of your putrefying ass.
Reply to
DarkMatter

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