New Engineer ... HELP!

Hello, Im a recent grad of Electrical Engineering. I basically concentrated in the computer systems area, low level programming and
hardware...
I had completed some co-op terms for my employment and after being in industry for a bit, I realized the job market isn't as good as I hoped. The private sector wasn't hiring, and if they were they had low security.
I have been offered a government job which is pretty good. Im unsure whether to take it because I want to get some good design experience too.
Also, I was considering switching disciplines and doing a civil eng. degree on top... Might be crazy? But it seems why do this career if there isn't much opportunity, especially in North America... HELP!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I could go on for a few paragraphs, but let me sum it up like this: GROW A SET!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article <61a7371e-1be8-4a53-9674-
says...

Dunno, I'm getting three calls a day from one Monster resume posting. I do have a bit more experience though (retired once already though back at it as a contractor, making twice as much ;). Even a job without a lot of security will be useful experience for the future dream job.

Engineering? If so, it's still experience.

Why? Computer architecture is a good job, but I don't think they're civil engineers. ;-) I'd think mechanical would have more overlap.
--
Keith

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

What forsaken spot in the world are you in where no-one is hiring EEs? You don't need to hide from the world and get a civil degree, too - that won't make you any more employable. Now, civil engineers are fine people who build nice warm dry buildings to put electrical things in - but it's a pretty common observation that EEs make more money than Civils, at most points through their careers.
If you can't find opportunities in all of North America, you're not looking. Go to your friendly local Yellow Pages, start going down the list of consulting firms and send each one a resume - then pick from the offers.
Maybe it's computer types that are a glut on the market? Check out the job ads in the back of IEEE Spectrum, perhaps?
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...

They're not. The market is certainly not cold. I can't imagine the heat being turned up much more. However, you have to be able to move to where the jobs are. Staying at home is the biggest mistake an engineer can make, for several reasons.
--
Keith

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jan 25, 6:59pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If you finished an EE program, you have nothing to worry about. You have problem solving skills that can be applied to any occupation. Just have a little patience. Some of the best electricians I have ever worked with were EEs working out of classification.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The largest percentage of engineers are Civil Engineer - unless you combine Electrical, Electronics, and Computer. We have a list with percentages on this page: http://theprofessionalengineer.com/employment/
You should take your EIT test and work to get your PE license --- even if you don't think you will need it now. It can help differentiate you from the crowd.
We also have some engineering resume help here: http://theprofessionalengineer.com/employment/engineering-resumes/
Best wishes, -- MRDPE
http://TheProfessionalEngineer.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.