Ribbin Halogen Lighting

Can anyone tell me what the hazards are of hooking up extra track and lights to a sysytem like this one shown below?
Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price: $589.95; per kit

Model: 2001-CLC x 5 (250)
Type: Available in Track or Cable
Track Type: Available in Cable, Low-voltage Track
Lamp Type: Available in Low Voltage Halogen
Electric Power: 300w
Glass Type: Available in Clear, Clear Colored, Frosted / Etched
Material: Glass
Color / Finish: Amber (Also available in Blue, Red, White)
Dimensions: 3.5" W x 3.75" H x 42.75" ext.
Number of Bulbs: 5
What I would like to do is purchase another kit and join them together with only one transformer....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Number of Bulbs: 5 What I would like to do is purchase another kit and join them together

Have you asked the manufacturer?
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You'll need a transformer that can handle double the load (600W), and all the wiring will need to handle double the amperage (50A). The track will also have to handle double the amperage and may not be able to.
You could use a double circuit transformer and seperately wire the tracks. But now your buying a third transformer and a very expensive one at that.
More track is not a problem, it's the more lights that will burn you. (and your house!)
Richard Reid, LC Luminous Views
Veteranboy wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| You'll need a transformer that can handle double the load (600W), and | all the wiring will need to handle double the amperage (50A). The track | will also have to handle double the amperage and may not be able to.
NEC 411.2 ... not more than 25 amps per circuit. You can branch out 2 or more circuits from the same transformer, apparently, up to the limit of a 20 amp line voltage circuit feeding the transformer. But you'll need separate overcurrent protection for each 25 amp or lower low voltage branch.
| You could use a double circuit transformer and seperately wire the | tracks. But now your buying a third transformer and a very expensive | one at that.
The tracks would need to be wired and OCP'd separately, anyway, if the combiantion needs more than 25 amps.
| More track is not a problem, it's the more lights that will burn you. | (and your house!)
The track can be a problem if you try to put more amps through it than what it is rated for. The 25 amp limit above is an NEC limit. If the track specifies a lower level of overcurrent protection, that must be adhered to.
If you want to extend the track to cover more areas, just put in another track and wire it separately through its own overcurrent protection. If you want more lighting density on the same track that would exceed the track rating or the 25 amp limit, put in another track in parallel and interleave the lights. Just be sure to keep them at a distance if they are uninsulated track.
--
|---------------------------------------/----------------------------------|
| Phil Howard KA9WGN (ka9wgn.ham.org) / Do not send to the address below |
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Did it ever occur that the OP might not be in the USA? Or subject to NEC?
If you read closely you'll find that your details are covered but merely stated in a more general way, rather than instructions to an electrician. Many track style systems are quite capable of doing everything he wants, and to NEC codes! Most DIY kits are not.
Our goals are the same, he has a bad idea for a DIY. But if the OP doesn't know that already then your fine points won't be understood.
snipped-for-privacy@ipal.net wrote:

** Such transformers are commonly available. They are generically known as lighting transformers. Most but not all, are designed for landscape lighting. Now that I look, the maker of the fixtures in question has 500W and 750W units in their own product line. (With double OCP mentioned in the literature. http://www.lightwavesconcept.com/pdf_catalogs/flex_II.pdf )

**A "circuit" usually includes all the required switches, fuses and loads. See lighting transformers. At first I thought he would have to throw out two kit transformers and by a third. Now I see the maker has the larger units. (Good for them!) But even so the remote transformers are a big price jump.

That's what I said. "more lights" = "put more amps through" Yes the most common failure of LV track is when homeowners overload the track. That is WHY the OCP is there, so they can't, accidentally or on purpose.
The only possible problem of JUST more track for the same load is voltage drop. There are many solutions to voltage drop with track such as T or loop wiring, and that was way beyond the OP. The maker sells additional track, for just that purpose!

**Valid solutions, much like "You could use a double circuit transformer and separately wire the tracks."
Cheers RickR
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| Can anyone tell me what the hazards are of hooking up extra track and | lights to a sysytem like this one shown below?
Fire, injury, or death, if hooked up wrong.
| Number of Bulbs: 5
What wattage per bulb? What total wattage or current with the two tracks combined?
| What I would like to do is purchase another kit and join them together | with only one transformer....
If your total of 10 bulbs in 2 tracks add up to not more than 240 watts, then you can run it on a single 25 amp low voltage branch circuit. But that itself may cause some voltage drop that can be annoying. At low voltages, voltage drop is much more dramatic than at line voltage. You are dealing with higher currents that give drops of more voltage, and that voltage has a greater relative effect because it's already running at a low voltage. Going from 120 volts down to 12 volts means voltage drop has 100 times more impact ... for the same size wire and same power level, the 12 volt system can only go 1/100 the distance as you can do at 120 volts (1/25 the distance for 24 volts, 1/16 the distance for 30 volts).
But if they add up to more, then you'll bump into the 25 amp restriction on low voltage branch circuits (or lower if the track is rated less). That doesn't rule out a combined transformer but it does require each branch have its own fuse or circuit breaker.
--
|---------------------------------------/----------------------------------|
| Phil Howard KA9WGN (ka9wgn.ham.org) / Do not send to the address below |
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.