Passive Earthquake Proofing w/ Dry Stone

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthquake_engineering#Friction_pendulum_bearing
"People of Inca civilization were masters of the polished dry-stone
walls, called ashlar, where blocks of stone were cut to fit together tightly without any mortar.
. . .
"Peru is a highly seismic land, and for centuries the mortar-free construction proved to be apparently more earthquake-resistant than using mortar. The stones of the dry-stone walls built by the Incas could move slightly and resettle without the walls collapsing which should be recognized as an ingenious passive structural control technique "
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But were they cut? I've heard that story before. It's hard enough to get a simple floor edging cut once to fit together around a corner- if the floor is tilted any way at all wrt the wall, you add in that 3rd dimension and things get *much* harder.
I liked the trapped miner's story about the blocks being poured in place. Some kind of nano-concrete that sets up like stone.
I also had a dream about large buildings-20-30 floors- whose entire sides were murals of various kinds. And the pixels making up the picture were cut stone blocks of different colors. But these blocks were highly regular, like cut by laser or something (magnetically separated?)
john
john
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They had to do _some_ chipping or they would spend all day looking for the right shape.

Maybe you need to chew on leaves to get everything to fit.

The plaster fell off after the last quake exposing these great cracks in the 18" - 2' thick concrete wall structure supposedly from an earlier quake decades ago. Several tenents vacated within days.
The walls were still plumb / flat / straight and the concrete pieces still fit together so nicely I wondered if the extra flex from the cracks might actually be an advantage. Then I read the Inca article and was reassured even more.
I suggested that the landlord shouldn't replaster. Kind of like post modern architecture, there's beauty in honesty as well as functional cracks.
Damping must be pretty effective. Look at how many resistors they use in electronics . . .

A 4.5 + will often get incorporated into my dreams except I'm in a 9 story building made of sandstone . . .
Bret Cahill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 10 May 2010 07:52:45 -0700 (PDT), Bret Cahill

Only a small minority of resistors are used for damping. In most products, none are.
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No wonder so many laptops break after you hurl them across the room!
Bret Cahill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yeah, ball and socket not unlike giant Lego.
--- ---
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.