Seeking Concrete Drilling expert

Hi, all,
I am an electrical engineer, but I have a Mech. E. question.
I am helping a friend with a project that involves drilling 3/8-in.
diameter (and deep) holes in concrete. I am aware of the bits on the market (carbide, diamond ; percussion, non-percussion), but I am not sure what would be optimal given the paramters of the application.
If you know concrete drilling and drill bits, can you please send me an email? I will send you the details, tell you what we are currently doing, and you can tell me if we are crazy or not.
Thanks,
Spencer
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Spencer) wrote in message

If memory serves (questionable these days) Uncle Al wrote the definitive article on drilling concrete. Search Sci.Chem or maybe his website for details. Richard
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What is your question,maybe I can help. rick
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Spencer) wrote in message

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Spencer) wrote in message

January 17, 2004

Milwaukee makes fairly standard hammer drills (easily distinguishable by their red color and name), and you can use a 3/8" dual use drill that switches to hammer mode, with any standard 3/8" carbide tipped masonry bit. The going gets a little tougher when you hit a piece of aggregate, depending on its hardness.

Sorry, I don't Yahoo. You should be able to borrow a drill from someone.
'Milwaukee Hammer Drill' 'Masonry Bit'
Thomas Lee Elifritz http://elifritz.members.atlantic.net
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Spencer) wrote in message

Spencer, How deep is 'deep`? As a practical matter, you should get good results from a carbide 'masonry bit` with some means of washing out the holes with water as you drill. Have a hose handy. The holes will tend to taper a bit. Best of luck, - Pragmatist - "It won't fit? - Use a bigger hammer!"
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January 19, 2004
snipped-for-privacy@netscape.net (pragmatist) wrote in message

18" is deep (rebar). 3" is shallow (lag bolts).

Actually, that is not a good idea. You can wash them out after you drill, but for shallow holes it's much easier to vacuum out the dust. Water will turn the cement dust into ... wet cement. Stick a thin tube down the hole and blow the dust out, and then afterwards, you can use water, and blow that out too, for a clean bore. Hey ... I'm a Milwaukee Hammer drill sub - genius. When I'm not cleaning toilets, I break big rocks into little rocks, with my teeth.
Another interesting phenomenon is masonry bit wobble.
And then, of course, there is reaming.
Not that anybody cares.
So, where is the god damn Mars rocks spectroscopy! We are already almost 20 days into the mission!. Now they are telling us we have to wait until April before they turn on the Marsis Radar Sounder? Oh, the horror ... The humanity of it all.
Thomas Lee Elifritz http://elifritz.members.atlantic.net
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