case trimmer

I have a counterbore with a removable pilot. You could use the same counterbore and turn up custom pilots for each caliber. As a matter of fact, I think that's how my old Forster trimmer is set up. Maybe I'll go look while I'm waiting for the chiles and garlic to cool.
Yup, just checked.
Pete Keillor
Reply to
Pete Keillor
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So you use chiles in your reloading for "hot loads", Pete? Interesting...
-- It is characteristic of all deep human problems that they are not to be approached without some humor and some bewilderment. -- Freeman Dyson
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Well it is Texas....
No, chili puree => chili gravy => cheese enchiladas from Robb Walsh's Tex-Mex Cookbook. We'll see if it's worth the bother. My handicapped son is a cheese enchilada lover.
Reply to
Pete Keillor
Say no more.
Aw, his taste is all in his mouth. Everyone knows that chicken enchos are the best, followed by string beef enchos.
-- It is characteristic of all deep human problems that they are not to be approached without some humor and some bewilderment. -- Freeman Dyson
Reply to
Larry Jaques
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Just checked mine, too. It is a Forster. Three stepped collets for all the reasonable sizes of cartridges. But the piloted counterbore is also the shaft -- all the way back to the crank.
I did mis-remember which way around I used it. Crank to the right, collet tailstock to the left.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
A Forster. I was just downstairs.
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I'm now *sure* that it would not handle a .50 BMG cartridge. I'm not sure about the big game cartridges. But I suspect that they are not reloaded that often. :-)
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
"Pete C." wrote in news:4f510967$0$2754$a8266bb1 @newsreader.readnews.com:
Straight wall pistol cases that headspace on the rim can be fairly forgiving. "Rimless" cases like 45 ACP that headspace on the mouth should be trimmed to a consistent length for best accuracy.
Bottleneck rifle cases should be trimmmed occasionally, depending on the loads & rifle. Mild loads can go a lot longer between trimmings. They should pretty much always be trimmed after the first firing.
I'm in the midst of trimming 3000 once fired .223/5.56 cases. Fortunately, I invested in a Giraud trimmer, which takes about 6 seconds a case. The downside is that it trims relative to the shoulder, so the length will vary if your sizing process isn't consistent.
Doug White
Reply to
Doug White
Well maybe not for many but I reload mine. WAY WAY to expensive to shoot a lot if you don't.
On the rounds I intend to use for long range work they get a LOT more work as well.
Brass gets inspected for case bulges, splits, cracks, odd deformations, primer pocket and head condition. Then tossed in the bowl and cleaned. Out of there to the bench. They get inspected again for any cleaning media or uncovered damage. Then they get trimmed, de-burred and chamfered along with case mouth wall thickness check. IF they are ones that I have fired before I don't resize them unless there is a problem. Then they get primed all from the same lot, powder all from the same lot and every 5 rounds the powder gets checked for weight. Bullets all get weighed and set into groups by weight. Load up the bullet then into the concentricity tester. This lets me check that each round has the bullet seated the same way and that the tip is centered and everything is OK. If the round checks out I apply a touch of sealer around the bullet and primer (basically melted candle wax in different colors depending on bullet weight) It sounds like a lot of work BUT when you get into a match where the difference between winning and placing can be measured in the thickness of a playing card you tend to get REALLY careful.
Now for plinking rounds for the AR I will just clean the brass, check it for problems, toss it in the hopper and fill the primer tray, powder hopper and bullet tube and start pulling the handle. I built a scale attachment that drops each finished round onto a modified electronic scale that I set to zero with a sample round. Light or heavy rounds trip a red LED and a solenoid that locks the lever so I check the round.
Reply to
Steve W.
Why not use your drill press or knee mill? Put a V block sideways to hold the cartridge vertically under the spindle. Use a counter bore. Lower quill onto case till it's the right length and adjust the quill lock. I think you could hold the case in the V block with your fingers if you don't apply too much pressure with the quill.
RWL
Reply to
GeoLane at PTD dot NET

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