Cutting lead

On 10/23/2011 9:19 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:


I haven't found out what the club paid but we have a huge war chest, we're very frugal. Great bunch of people and we have lots of programs for the members, the ladies and the kids. We have a great commercial kitchen and rent out the clubhouse for all sorts of events. The best part is that it's four minutes away! I've learned more in the past three years than I have all my life before I joined.
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Oh, I was under the assumption that the company did it for you in return for the salvaged metal, but I forgot to ask.

Outstanding. You're an instructor there now, too, aren't you?
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On 10/20/2011 10:46 PM, Tom Gardner wrote:

You have lots of interesting suggestions. I would like to suggest you use a power wood splitter. Some of them are designed to operate without having to lift the wood up onto the splitter. Your 500 lb. piece could just stay on the ground and be slid onto the bottom of the splitter.
Paul
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Mallet and chisel. No messy "sawdust" to deal with, and if all you are trying to do is get it into manageable chunks, works fine. Figure out how big a bite you can take, take it, and then take the next one, gen that you are dealing with an odd-shaped lump.
With sheet lead, chisel-cutting can do fairly precise work (I spent a while lead-armoring photomultiplier tubes when I was a lab technician - cutting and then forming sheet lead.)
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I wish I lived closer. I'd gladly trade you some ingots of wheel weight lead for your dead soft lead. I'd like to have some dead soft lead for black powder shooting.
RWL

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An air chisel, sharpened to an acute angle, like for wood. Whittle off shavings.
The shavings can be pot-melted afterward, to make handy size cast slugs.
You can also turn lead into shavings fairly quickly with a drill (but the metal is grabby).
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Hmm... it's not as big as I visualized. 500 lb of lead is a bit more than five gallons in volume. As has already been mentioned, I'd haul an OA torch to the piece, place catchpans in strategic places to catch the melt, and start melting. Actually, cutting. Cut in quarters first. You might be able to manhandle the four 125 lb pieces into your car or truck. Or just keep cutting. Once they're in eighths, you may be able to drop a piece into a 4 or 5 quart cast iron kettle and place it over a turkey-fryer burner to finish melting. Dip it out, pour into ingots. Send me a couple for the great instruction. :-) -- Best -- Terry
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