Glassblowing torch design?

I'm interested in experimenting a bit with "scientific glassblowing". The
glass in question is Pyrex. I've made a start with an oxyacetylene torch
equipped with a heating tip and the whole clamped in a vise. It works, but
it would be fun to have a "real" burner with independent controls for inner
and outer flames, surface mixing and other bells & whistles. What would
*not* be fun would be parting with the money to buy one. A Bethlehem Great
White, for example, goes for something over $2000 new.
Anyone tried making a glassworker's bench burner?
-- Greg
Reply to
Greg Dermer
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I can't remember for sure but I think glassblowers use propane with oxygen or just plain air. It's definitely not acetylene. I think it's because acetylene adds carbon and/or other impurities to the glass. Randy
Reply to
Randy Replogle
"Creative Glass blowing" by Hammesfahr and Stong is an interesting read. They basically say 'buy it', which considering the Amateur Scientist background is a pretty strong hint.
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Reply to
Dave Garnett
You need Propane/Oxygen for glass work. Just starting out you can get a new Nortel Major for about $400 that will be 90% of what you need but glass fires come up regularly on eBay. . There is a Major on eBay right now for $150 and a really nice Sargent Welch for $230.
Reply to
Glenn Ashmore
Greg; Use propane with oxygen for pyrex or kimax glasses. The professional burners are made with a brass (or stainless steel) outer shell. Inside this shell is a number of stainless steel heavy walled tubes silver soldered around a central burner. The central burner is used for most work. The outer flame (combined with the inner flame) is good for large items, bending, or flame annealing. There is a safety factor involved here - a big one. I would suggest buying a used torch. A National #3 handtorch or a Carlisle handtorch will work for most items. I have an antique torch that I am planning to put on ebay in a week or so. You may see it at:
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I am not longer blowing glass and have been selling off most of my glassworking tools. This antique is the last torch I'm selling. The others were all rather big and expensive newer styles like a CC, Sargent, and unusual Cenco. I was talking with a friend a couple weeks ago and he told me a friend of his had developed a new style of torch; but I'm not certain if he is mass marketing them. Jim
Reply to
JAMES RISER
There are some excellent glass people on rec.crafts.glass.. One of them, at least, is a published author on hot glass works, so you might get some valuable advice there.
good luck
Reply to
hmHAT
Mayne Island Glass Foundry sells a video on the construction of homemade burners. I can't vouch for the content but it looks like it might be just the ticket...
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Reply to
Eddie Munster
Many years ago I built a 6 burner glass torch from stock burner heads and brass pipe. It worked great. Somewhere I have a good book on scientific glass blowing, If I can find it I'll give you the title. Bugs
Reply to
Bugs
I have the book, "Creative Glassblowing" (IIRC) by James Hammesfahr & Clair Stong. It has been out of print for a few years, and was mainly about scientific glassblowing (which is why I kinda doubt my recollection of the title). It did include details of building burners using small gears and metal tubing. However, I don't think it gave details of building a 6-burner torch, unless it was a crossfire.
Sure is easier to buy the burners already made. Unless you just like the challenge.
Joe
Bugs wrote:
Reply to
Joe
Thanks for all the advice.
-- Greg
Reply to
Greg Dermer

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