How do I use a Split bolt ? (electrical)

I have a 60 amp circuit with a single outlet (I believe an L5-50) that I use for my welder. I want to add a second outlet to this circuit so
that I don't have to keep unplugging/plugging when I want to use another welder. I won't be using both welders at the same time. The conductors are 6 gauge. Normally I would use some wire nuts but I can't find any that are rated to hold three 6 gauge conductors. The home centers in my area have big blue wire nuts that can only hold two 6 gauge wires. They also have split bolts. Can I use these? Do I just strip the middle of one wire and the end of the other wire, then insert them into the split bolt? Then wrap with electrical tape? I'm a bit leery of a 208V, 60A circuit insulated with electrical tape. Is shrink tube any safer? Finding a shrink tube with diameter greater than the length of the split bolt might be tricky. Are these split bolts only intended for ground conductors?
I would add another circuit except my panel is completely full.
Any ideas? Thanks.
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Albert we:

You could do it that way. Just use lots of tape to get the proper insulation thickness. Or, in the alternative, you could take one of your esisting breaker and run a sub=panel from it. That way you have room for future expansion.
Jim Chandler
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A more suitable device would be a "terminal block". Some are made to accept several wires and keep them in using a push-down setscrew. I have some in my "stuff pile", they are not hard to find.
i

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That will work fine. Id put in a sub panel with a breaker for each welder..shrug..but thats just me.
Electrical tape is just fine. Wrap well with multiple layers.
Gunner
Political Correctness is a doctrine fostered by a delusional, illogical liberal minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.
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You can also get self vulcanizing tape specifically made for high voltage splices. Get it at an electrical store, no HD or Lowes. then wrap that with lots of electrical tape.
This stuff
" Scotch 23 Rubber Splicing Tape is a highly conformable, self-fusing Ethylene Propylene Rubber (EPR) based high-insulating voltage tape. Scotch 23 has a "snakeskin" liner that is easily removed as the tape is applied. "
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Dan wrote:

Nice stuff, but 208V isn't remotely close to "high voltage", and indeed I expect it's 120/208 Y service so it is only 120V to ground. Heck, 120/208V is less then the normal 120/240V in residences. Regular quality electrical tape like 3M's Super 33+ is quite sufficient.
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The good thing about using splicing tape is that it wears better. For instance should he splice and the cable just kinda flops around on the floor or against a brick wall, abrasion could "sandpaper" through mere plain old electrical tape. However it won't likely wear through splice tape.
When electricians make splices with those split bolts they use splice tape and then a good layer of electrical tape.
If you want to get really fancy you could smear a little antioxidizing grease on the bare wire before you tape.
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GatherNoMoss wrote:

When I first started learning about this sort of stuff we used "rubber tape" first and then covered that with black cloth adhesive "friction tape" to handle any abrasion.
Vinyl tape wasn't invented yet. <G>
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
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Jeff Wisnia wrote:

Yes and Western Union splices soldered, "T" taps on runs for drops. All sort of things the current crop of electricians would't know of. :-) ...lew...
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We used to pigtail the ceiling box connections pointed downward, flux, and then solder with a swiveling solder pot heated on a pump-up gasoline blowtorch. Let cool, rubber tape and friction tape. Installed lots of turn-key switch lampholders on green drop wire and a lot of pull-chains. No wall switches, only one or two receptacles, typically for refrigerator and electric iron. Radios, etc, powered from ceiling light by screw-in adapter. Worst was boring holes and cutting ceiling box holes in heart pine with a keyhole saw while standing on a rickety ladder. The "good old days" when REA was extending lines in rural areas (late '40s).
Don Young
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There are a lot of places around still without power line power. REA did a great job that is for sure - have friends that got power in the 50's. There are ranches here that have to generate it as there isn't enough wind to have a water well much less an electric one.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com/
Don Young wrote:

-
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Yep - just bought a roll of 'rubber' tape and a roll of Fiberglass. Both 3-M and good products.
Waterproof a connection and the fiberglass is high temp stuff for oven/stove...
I was in the process of building a rod oven but got a nice kitchen oven that was just the ticket - bench top - and temp control. 'Very large toaster oven' that was discarded when someone overflowed cheese in it and left a messy oven. I cooked it outside for a while - still smells a bit.
The Kitchen stove electric Calrod elements will now likely be made into a powercoat oven. There I'll use the Fiberglass to put some protection over the insulation tape.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com/
Jeff Wisnia wrote:

-
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The split bolts are the way to go. The best way to insulate them is to wrap with splicing tape, which is thick, rubbery and self-vulcanizing, then cover that with vinyl electrical tape. Make sure the split bolts are compatible with your wire (aluminum or copper). Wire brush the wire and use de-ox goo if it is aluminum.
You should also be aware that a multi-outlet circuit greater than 50A in a residential setting is *not* code compliant.
--
Ned Simmons

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wrote:

Yes. When it is done properly the splicing tape melds into a rubber cocoon around the split-bolt. When you wrap the vinyl tape around that the last pass should be without tension, if you keep stretching the tape as you apply it will have a tendency to unwrap.
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Can you point me to the section of code that says this??
Thanks
William....
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On Tue, 13 Nov 2007 11:12:34 -0600, "William"

Section 210.3, at least as of the 2002 edition. My emphasis added:
************* 210.3 Rating. Branch circuits recognized by this article shall be rated in accordance with the maximum permitted ampere rating or setting of the overcurrent device. The rating for **other than individual branch circuits** shall be 15, 20, 30, 40, and 50 amperes. <snip>
Exception: Multioutlet branch circuits greater than 50 amperes shall be permitted to supply nonlighting outlet loads on industrial premises where conditions of maintenance and supervision ensure that only qualified persons service the equipment. **************
BTW, I'm not sure how they get away with posting this, but here's NFPA70 2002 in pdf format. http://www.getphillips.com/electric/NEC2002.PDF
--
Ned Simmons

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Not my code, but I would have thought that one would have a reasonable argument for an intelligent user of a home shop that is read up on the codes to be sufficiently qualified to be able to service and operate equipment that they have installed in that shop. Maybe not...
Mark Rand RTFM
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But even the most qualified user of a home shop would not make the typical home shop an "industrial premise".
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On Tue, 13 Nov 2007 22:09:35 -0800, "William Noble"

Oversize wire is OK, 50A receps on a 30A breaker are not.
--
Ned Simmons

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On Tue, 13 Nov 2007 22:51:49 +0000, Mark Rand

I'm reasonable, you're reasonable, and most likely the OP is reasonable. But given a choice between reason and the plain language of the code, the electrical inspector will go with the code. That's the blessing and curse of bright-line regulations.
--
Ned Simmons

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