How do you cut off Cobalt tool bits to length?

I have a 2" long, 1/4" square Cobalt tool bit I have ground for cutting
internal threads with a boring bar.
The bit is too long to fit in the hole in the work.
My Dremel cut off wheel is very slow, and grinding an inch off would be
worse.
TIA
Reply to
Clark Magnuson
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Use a parting wheel to notch the tool all around and then give it a sharp hit with a hammer. Place a piece of aluminum shim under one end so the cut is not supported. Should break cleanly at the parting line. A parting wheel should but fairly fast---you might find you want to just cut it in half with one.
Harold
Harold
Reply to
Harold & Susan Vordos
What Harold said -- also, use an air die grinder with a cutoff mandrel or a cheap cutoff air tool. Clark, if you don't have those, you're welcome to come over and do it at my house. To break it, put the lower end in the bench vise with the top sticking straight up, then put a rag over everything and hit the top smartly with a hammer right through the rag. Else you may never find the top piece (don't ask me how I learned this :-). - GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Score it with the dremel, stick it in the bench vice and snap it off with a well placed hammer blow. Regards. Ken.
Reply to
Ken Davey
1) notch one side of the tool all the way across, 1/16 or so deep. A v-notch works best
2) place the tool in your vise, sticking straight up, with the notch towards you.
3) cover with a rag
4) smack the tool with a brass hammer, away from you.
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
The tungsten carbide metal saw blades (for metal cutting hand saw, the "blade" looks like a piece of wire with crystals), MEANT for cutting ceramic tiles, do work really well for cutting hardened metals.
Kristian Ukkonen.
Reply to
Kristian Ukkonen
OK, I broke it. That works.
I cut the internal threads. They are not supposed to be left handed:( I'm going to bed.
Reply to
Clark Magnuson

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