Is this compressor worth anything?

More accurately: would it be worth anything if it's not broken, worn out,
or otherwise trashed, and how likely is it to have problems that won't
show up immediately?
Nameplate says "Emerson". I'd be using it mostly for filling tires and
painting model airplanes.
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Reply to
Tim Wescott
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Offer this guy 50 smackers for his Quincy:
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the motor with a 2 HP 1 phase and be happy for a long, long time, would be my advice.
--Winston
Reply to
Winston
$50 is actually pushing the "play" budget a bit, it's just that I'm getting damn tired of rattle-can paint jobs. So $50 + a motor is a bit hard to swing, unless I can trade the 3-phase motor for a 2-phase, or unless there's a _cheap_ and reliable way to cobble it up with start caps and run at reduced HP.
I was looking at this, too, but without knowing where it's been it's hard to know:
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Reply to
Tim Wescott
That looks like a dentists compressor.
Reply to
Steve W.
Look at some of the very small compressors from the cheap auto places and use an old Propane tank for a resrvoir?

Reply to
Dennis
I've picked up several compressor motors of that style that were not putting out much air until the head had been removed and the reed valves cleaned, didn't need any new parts and aren't real complicated, just be sure to reassemble correctly (hopefully some one else has been there already and mis-assembled it).
Just a tip - if you go to look at it, pick it up off the ground a little bit and kind of wobble it back and forth, if it seems half full of water that may give you a clue as to whether to get it, or a bargaining point if it feels like it's got water in it.
Reply to
mike
Very funny!
I have a 10 HP Quincy and I paid $200 for it.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus19887
I've picked up several compressor motors of that style that were not putting out much air until the head had been removed and the reed valves cleaned, didn't need any new parts and aren't real complicated, just be sure to reassemble correctly (hopefully some one else has been there already and mis-assembled it).
Just a tip - if you go to look at it, pick it up off the ground a little bit and kind of wobble it back and forth, if it seems half full of water that may give you a clue as to whether to get it, or a bargaining point if it feels like it's got water in it.
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I picked a nice clean unit (probably less than 12 months old) from the hard junk verge collection a few months back.
I pressed the reset button on the motor & away it went. Runs fine!
Reply to
Dennis
Oops, that should read 'not mis-assembled it'
Reply to
mike
It's a nice little wobble-piston oilless that should be plenty for a homeowner. You can get parts for it if you need to, the head is either Gast or Thomas or Speedaire. And check the tank for signs of huge rust or pinholes - you don't patch leaking and rusted-out pressure vessels, you replace them. (Or try to sell them off to someone else.)
Forget the big 10-HP 3-Ph unless you're planning to work on cars and need that much air - you would need at least a 7-1/2 HP single-phase motor and a sheave change to use it at a residence - or a rotary phase converter. Forget a static, they don't put out enough power.
And the third one looks Real Rough. Wouldn't even think about it unless it's hooked up and running.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman (munged human
This one certainly wondered about valves and rings!!
And I hadn't noticed the lack of guards, but that's a good point. It could be retrofit -- at the cost of time I'd rather spend doing other things.
Reply to
Tim Wescott
(...)
We all need to think more like Iggy, Tim:
Iggy: Very funny! Iggy: Iggy: I have a 10 HP Quincy and I paid $200 for it.
The real answer is to buy the Quincy for $50:
1) Invest some sweat equity to clean it up and test it. 2) Offer it on eBay for say $1500:
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Buy a few decent compressors with the profits.
--Winston
Reply to
Winston
And spend the price difference for earplugs. :-) Good belt driven compressors are *much* quieter in operation than the oil-free ones.
Unless you mean the really small ones designed to pug into the cigarette lighter socket (if you still have one) to refill tires on the road. And those take forever to move much air. Totally useless for painting. :-)
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
What I found funny is the idea of putting a 2 HP motor on a 10 HP QUincy.
yep...
Reply to
Ignoramus19887
actually, if you put a 1/4 HP motor on it (with proper reduction) you would have a much better compressor than one of those buzzy little things - in fact a old "free' washing machine motor will run it just fine, just well below capacity - that will be a very efficient (thermodynamically) compressor
Reply to
Bill
(...)
He needed 40 PSI. That would have done it all day, all night. Even if it required a jack-shaft to adjust for lower RPM at sufficient torque: http://209.85.48.9/2428/142/upload/p3275451.jpg
I like the second idea better too.
--Winston
Reply to
Winston
(...)
Quiet, too.
--Winston
Reply to
Winston
They are certainly noisy - Once I forgot to turn mine off at the power point, I'm sure the neighbors were impressed with it coming on at 3am when the air leaked down. Had to drag myself out of bed to shut if off.
I was thinking of the small ones for running airbrushes. Your'e right about the tyre compressors - all pressure and no volume.
Reply to
Dennis
A 10 HP Quincy compressor is no less noisy.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus8003
(...)
At 350 RPM, the Quincy would be quieter. Cleaned and sold, it would be *much* quieter. :)
--Winston
Reply to
Winston

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