Need a lesson on soldier and brazing

Hey guys, I was looking for some good information on soldiering and brazing and haven't found what i'm looking for yet. Thought I'd just
ask here. If anyone has a good link please let me know, otherwise, I'm curious what the difference is and what all the different types are of each, what metals they are used for and what type of heat source is necessary. Also when flux is necessary and what to use. I'm also curious what would work, and be best to join two pieces of 1/4 inch round carbide stock at a right angle. I want to make a custom 60 degree inside thread cutter that will mount in a router and cut threads in wood. Maybe I should just grind a HSS round blank down instead. Let me know if I'm going down the wrong path.
Thanks, Scott
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Hey guys, I was looking for some good information on soldiering and brazing and haven't found what i'm looking for yet. Thought I'd just ask here. If anyone has a good link please let me know, otherwise, I'm curious what the difference is and what all the different types are of each, what metals they are used for and what type of heat source is necessary. Also when flux is necessary and what to use. I'm also curious what would work, and be best to join two pieces of 1/4 inch round carbide stock at a right angle. I want to make a custom 60 degree inside thread cutter that will mount in a router and cut threads in wood. Maybe I should just grind a HSS round blank down instead. Let me know if I'm going down the wrong path.
Thanks, Scott
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wrote:

My lesson on soldiering is, far from commanders, and close to the canteen.
i
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On 2 Apr 2005 02:12:13 GMT, Ignoramus9970

A lot of good information at:
http://www.handyharmancanada.com /
Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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Scott,
A good little book is "Soldering and Brazing" by Tubal Cain. Number 9 in the Workshop Practice Series. I've got my own copy on order - I'm sick of the local library sending me overdue notices <g>.
There are one or two other books with exactly the same title, by other authors. I don't know anything about them, but Tubal Cain's books are good, practical productions - and cheap into the bargain.
Another book by the same author, "Hardening, Tempering and Heat Treatment" is also a good little reference.
Roger
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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Are you sure the "Hardening, Tempering and Heat Treatment" book is by Cain? On Amazon, the author is listed as "George Gently" (although that may be a different book with the same title).
- Michael
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Yes, Tubal Cain, I bought my own copy just recently. Do a google search and you'll get several hundred hits.
Roger
DeepDiver wrote:

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I want to make a custom 60

You will not be able to cut threads with your router.
Why don't you ask what is the best way to cut __________threads into wood. Also specify what kind of wood you want to thread and why you want to thread it.
There is a lot of practical knowledge here and you need do is ask the right question.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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On Sat, 2 Apr 2005 13:41:07 -0800, the inscrutable "Roger Shoaf"

Tell Beall that. They've been selling a tool for that for years. www.bealltool.com/ (though it doesn't appear to be up right now)
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You mean this: http://www.bealltool.com/threader.htm
They use taps to cut the internal threads.
If the guy is going to make a pool cue he would be better off using a metal bezel that would joint the two halves of the cue than to try and rely on threading wood to give a nice tight fit. Every wood thread I have ever seen has a whole lot of slop in it and that probably would not be ideal for a pool cue. A loose fit between the front and back half of the cue will dampen the energy you are trying to deliver to the cue ball.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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On Sun, 3 Apr 2005 08:11:31 -0700, "Roger Shoaf"

It does appear that Beall uses taps for internal threads. I can imagine a router-based tool or jig that could cut internal threads, but it would take some machining. The basic idea would be that the router bit would have the correct shape, and the router axis would be offset and canted at the proper helix angle. The jig would then advance the workpiece axially as it is rotated, thus cutting the internal thread to the correct pitch. I expect this would cut considerably better threads in wood than a tap could do because the cutter would be running at high speed, removing only a bit of wood per cut. Sounds like an interesting project.
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Thanks for the input, but I'm pretty sure I will be able to cut internal threads using a router mounted to the lathe. Here is where I got this specific idea. http://www.cuemaker.com/book_on_cue_building/08cutboretools_web.PDF . Also, I'm pretty sure the beall threading kit uses a router to cut the external threads but a tap to cut internals. I want the threads to come out being better than a tap will do in wood. Also, these will be threaded after several hours of work on each piece, not to mention money invested, so I want the lowest possible chance of damage being done. I want to do this to build pool cues and woods threaded will mainly be hard maple, but could also include cocobolo, ebony, purpleheart, padauk, wenge, and more.
I haven't had a chance to really check out the link or book but it sounds promising.
Thanks again. Scott
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Seems to me to be a lot of work to end up with internal threads in wood. Why not cut the thread in a metal insert and epoxy the insert into the cue? This would be a whole lot easier and stronger than trying to thread the wood itself.
--

Roger Shoaf

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The metal inserts give the cue a different feel than the cues with a pin into wood. I'd like to make a different shaft for a cue I own that has a 3/8 X 10TPI pin in wood.
I will also need to figure it out if anyone wants me to build them a shaft for such a cue. If other people can do it I'm sure I can figure it out, plus that's half the fun. This is mainly just a hobby for me.
I ordered some 1/4" round HSS rod to grind into shape to try for now. The guy in the link above says that HSS isn't rigid enough, but if it's used to cut metal threads, i dont' see why it can't cut them in wood. Maybe he didn't try it with taking enough cuts and doing that last few without moving the toolholder to clean everything up.
thanks, Scott
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On 2 Apr 2005 17:29:35 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

That should work fine. You might want to cant the router vertically at an angle equal to the helix angle of the thread. That way the tool will be following the path of the thread as it rotates, and the 60-degree point will really cut a 60 degree thread.
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