Removing bead inside square tubing

Cutting some 2 1/2" square tubing into 4 inch pieces today and I found
that the weld bead inside the tubing prevents it from being a slip fit over
the two inch tubing. My pieces are only four inches long so access isn't
really an issue. Does anyone have ideas better than a die grinder for
taking this bead off?
Can I "lay it down" with a torch? Would that take it down enough? I
forgot the inside dimension of the tubing, so the bead will obviously make
up the difference in the clearance, which is fine with me.
Reply to
carl mciver
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This would be a fine application for one of those long die-grinder-type belt grinders. - GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
On Wed, 4 May 2005 17:42:16 -0700, carl mciver wrote (in message ):
I made and used a broach on 1/2" tubing where access was a problem. Mine were also short pieces, well within the capacity of my hydraulic press.
Roger in Vegas Worlds Greatest Impulse Buyer
Reply to
Roger Hull
Careful use of an arc air gouge should do the trick quickly. Juat stick the carbon out an extra three inches and go in from each end. Randy
Reply to
Randy Zimmerman
A mini air belt sander would work perfectly for this.
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are other way more expensive brands. Look in McMaster or MSC. Lane
Reply to
Lane
If it warrants the setup time, square both ends, then use a die sink end mill to remove the weld. You can tailor the quality to the demand that way.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
Know anybody who's got a shaper? This is a job taylor-made for one...
Jerry
Reply to
Jerry Foster
I've done this. It works, but have several spare belts on hand.
Reply to
Don Foreman
Since the pieces are but 4" long, do it the way the old-timers would -- with a cold chisel.
You may have to regrind your point to get the proper work angle between the chisel and workpiece.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
I do this all the time. Simply lay it flat in a vise and stick in a course mill bastard file and give it a few passes. Since the file sticks out both ends, its easy to apply pressure evenly.
Gunner
Liberals - Cosmopolitan critics, men who are the friends of every country save their own. Benjamin Disraeli
Reply to
Gunner
access isn't
obviously make
WHY NOT JUST BUY A PIECE OF "RECEIVER" TUBING THAT'S USED ON TRAILER HITCHES. RECEIVERS. IT DOESN'T HAVE THE SEAM IN IT.
RONNIE
Reply to
Ronnie
| | WHY NOT JUST BUY A PIECE OF "RECEIVER" TUBING THAT'S USED ON TRAILER | HITCHES. RECEIVERS. IT DOESN'T HAVE THE SEAM IN IT. | | RONNIE
Well, I'll be using over 20 pieces with my current project. I need to do it cheap, and have lots of time coming up.
Reply to
carl mciver
As Gunner suggested; File it. Simple, cheap, satisfying.
Ken.
Reply to
Ken Davey
I vote for filing too, after thinking about it. Real good excuse to buy a new 12" bastard file with a nice new handle. - GWE
Ken Davey wrote:
Reply to
Grant Erwin
For multiple pieces? Not saying it won't work, but how much trouble is anyone willing to endure to remove 4" of weld? I'd suggest that it could prove to be a daunting task, especially if the welds have considerable flash. That's really the key to how to make the parts fit. If the flash is substantial, filing could get old real fast. By handling properly, each part could conceivably be machined as I suggested in no more than two or three minutes, with complete control.
Do keep in mind I don't like using files for anything except for deburring. Others may enjoy their use.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
BECAUSE SOMETIMES YOU CAN GET THE WELDED TUBING FOR FREE RATHER THAN HAVING TO PAY AN ARM AND A LEG FOR IT. AND OTHER TIMES YOU MAY HAVE TO GO MANY MANY MILES TO FIND RECEIVER TUBING AND YOU MAY HAVE SOME OF THE WELDED KIND IN YOUR STOCKPILE.
GUNNER
Liberals - Cosmopolitan critics, men who are the friends of every country save their own. Benjamin Disraeli
Reply to
Gunner
Less filling, tastes great. Low in carbs, high in fiber and can increase your bicep size by at least 1" in less than 90 days or your money back!
Gunner
Liberals - Cosmopolitan critics, men who are the friends of every country save their own. Benjamin Disraeli
Reply to
Gunner
YEP! I AGREE WITH GUNNER.
HAROLD
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
The fastest would probably be a broach. The broach would be a single pass solution and would happen in seconds. You'll spend more time swapping parts than the actual work itself. Do backup the joint for more repeatable machining.
-- Why isn't there an Ozone Hole at the NORTH Pole?
Reply to
Bob May
| The fastest would probably be a broach. The broach would be a single pass | solution and would happen in seconds. You'll spend more time swapping parts | than the actual work itself. Do backup the joint for more repeatable | machining.
This one I considered awhile, but all I have is air, arc, and a torch, no machine tools. If I could secure a chisel in a smaller piece of pipe somehow, then pound on the inside pipe/broach, I wonder how far it'd get before I couldn't get it out anymore or broke the chisel. I think I have a chisel for the air hammer, I'll have to see how well that does.
I won't be able to get to this idea for a few days, I just had my shoulder operated on yesterday and the tradeoff with being able to use both sets of fingers in more pain. Can't win somedays... All ideas will be entertained/attempted eventually, depending on how much I can get away with doing when the wife isn't here to watch over me!
Reply to
carl mciver

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