VFDs & 3 Phase Motors

VFDs & 3 Phase Motors
All-righty then. This may sound stupid, but when you run a 3 phase motor
off of a VFD what is your speed range relative to the original speed of the
motor?
Approximately of course. Mileage will vary I am sure.

Reply to
Bob La Londe
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Depends a bit on the motor and more on the VFD. Flux vector VFDs (more expensive) can run down to zero RPM at full torque, if the motor has adequate forced cooling. For general purpose motors and VFDs, you can usually go to 50% RPM (watch out for motor overheating) up to 200% rated RPM. You get constant torque below rated speed, and constant HP above.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
I get good results from 6Hz to 90Hz on my mill (3HP) and small lathe (1 HP). They're both running open loop. so there's a significant drop in torque at the very low end, but those speeds are still useful in many cases, e.g., spot, drill, and power tap without changing belt speeds. I've never had a problem with overheating, but I'll typically switch to a lower belt or gear ratio rather than running at low motor RPM for long periods of time.
I'm getting ready to install a VFD on my big (10HP) lathe, and will probably implement a similar speed range, but expect the low Hz range will be most useful for gear changes and jogging.
A sensorless flux vector drive will improve low end torque somewhat. A closed loop (encoder feedback) vector drive can produce close to full torque down to zero speed.
If you have the option of changing belts or gears when you really need lots of torque at low spindle speeds, an open loop drive is probably all you need.
Reply to
Ned Simmons
Ned Simmons fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
And forced-air cooling isn't all that big a task to build, for almost any ventilated motor (might be hard on a TENV! )
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Well, yeah... You can put a fan blowing over the motor case, but unless you've got the inside fan stirring the air and eliminating hot spots it's still going to release the Magic Smoke.
Works much better to externally ventilate an open motor.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman (munged human
If all else fails, Read The Friendly Manual for the motor.
The ones that are rated for "Inverter Duty" (a VFD) will have all that info listed in the catalog and on the cut sheets.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman (munged human
I like Marathon, used a lot of them at work. I put a 1 hp. on my Hardinge TM mill. It's inverter rated, TENV, so fan cooling doesn't exist. It was about $230 new five years ago, no idea what they're running now.
Pete Keillor
Reply to
Pete Keillor

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