Mars Exploration Rover Update - April 17, 2007

http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/status.html#opportunity
OPPORTUNITY UPDATE: Investigating a Dark Streak - sol 1139-1144,
April 17, 2007:
Opportunity is healthy and spent the last week investigating the dark material trailing north from "Victoria Crater." The plan this week included two brief robotic arm campaigns at different areas roughly 33 meters (108 feet) apart. Opportunity will collect a series of microscopic images and alpha particle X-ray spectrometer integrations on the soil along with other remote science observations.
Sol-by-sol summary:
Each sol starts with a panoramic camera tau and miniature thermal emission spectrometer mini sky and ground stare right after handing over from the previous sol's master sequence. At the end of each sol's plan, right before transitioning to the following sol, there is a navigation camera bitty cloud observation and a miniature thermal emission spectrometer mini sky and ground stare.
Sol 1139 (April 8, 2007): Opportunity conducted remote sensing on the dark streak. The rover then took stereo microscopic images of "Palencia" and "Pontevedra." Opportunity then moved its robotic arm out of the way to prepare for argon integration position. The panoramic camera was then used to image the rover tracks. The rover began alpha particle X-ray spectromter argon integration. Opportunity then had a mini deep sleep. After waking, the rover looked for clouds with its navigation camera. The panoramic camera was used to image the sky.
Sol 1140: On this sol, Opportunity continued to conduct remote sensing on the dark streak. The rover then placed the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer on the soil. The panoramic camera conducted some photometry, then took a 13-filter image of track target "Zamora." The miniature thermal emission spectrometer examined Zamora and then the undisturbed soil behind it. The alpha particle X-ray spectrometer was then placed on the soil. The rover then went into deep sleep.
Sol 1141: Opportunity continued remote sensing on the dark streak. The panoramic camera took a panoramic image to test for albedo (light reflectivity). The miniature thermal emission spectrometer did a 7- point sky & ground stare. Before the Mars Odyssey pass, the panoramic camera was used for photometry experiments. The miniature thermal emission spectrometer conducted an elevation sky & ground stare and then it stared at the calibration target. After a deep sleep, the navigation camera looked for clouds in the sky.
Sol 1142: On the morning of this sol, the miniature thermal emission spectrometer conducted a mini sky & ground stare. The rover then drove 31.23 meters (102.5 feet) to a second location in the dark streak. The navigation camera imaged a future robotic arm target and the panoramic camera imaged a future drive direction and then took a tau measurement.
Sol 1143: Opportunity bumped 2.21 meters (7.3 feet). The panoramic camera took a tau measurement and the miniature thermal emission spectrometer did a sky and ground stare. Before it moved again, Opportunity took a 13-filter panoramic camera image of target "Alicante." The rover then stowed its arm and drove about 3 meters (9.8 feet) to Alicante. Opportunity then unstowed its arm and autoplace software put it on Alicante. A microscopic image mosaic of Alicante was taken. The Moessbauer spectrometer did a quick touch of Alicante before the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer was placed on the target. Before the Odyssey pass, the panoramic camera took a tau measurement. During the orbiter's pass, Opportunity's miniature thermal emission spectrometer did a sky and ground stare. After the Odyssey pass, the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer was integrated on target Alicante.
Sol 1144: This sol saw more remote sensing on the dark streak. The panoramic camera took a tau measurement, the miniature thermal emission spectrometer did a sky and ground stare. The panoramic camera took a 13-filter image of "Avila," and then the miniature thermal emission spectrometer stared at the same target. Before the Odyssey pass, the panoramic camera took another tau measurement. During the pass, the miniature thermal emission spectrometer conducted an elevation sky and ground stare. The rover then went into deep sleep.
Current Odometry:
As of sol 1143, Opportunity's total odometry is 10,443.41 meters (6.5 miles).
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