Old Bachman GE 44 Ton = 2 Plymouths?

In an effort to model my most local railroad, the Wood River Branch Rail
Road (1874-1947, southern Rhode Island, USA), I have now concluded that
I will need to scratch build / kitbash a Plymouth model HL Type 2 (18 or
20 ton), the WRBRR's last locomotive. My search for a drive train is
now leaning toward 1/2 of a last-generation Bachman Spectrum GE 44 Ton
Switcher.
Each truck appears to be independently powered with its own motor and
gearbox. The wheels are right on at 33" diameter and the wheel base is
close to the required 71-1/2". The plastic side frames look to be
easily removable.
Has anyone here been down this road already?
Can each of these trucks be operated alone?
Should I expect any traction and/or pick-up problems?
Does anyone have an old clapped-out one they want to sell cheap?
Thanks in advance.
Bill MacIndoe
Reply to
MacIndoe
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Bill, If you have the 'older' Bachmann 44 ton loco, yes, both trucks are powered independently and can be run alone. I have used one to make a 24 ton boxcab and a 32 ton end cab. (Both standard gauge.)
The sideframes are removable.
But, the new 44 ton locos are single motored with drive shafts to each truck. So be sure that you buy an older locomotive.
-- From the computer of Frank A. Rosenbaum
Reply to
Frank A. Rosenbaum
Hi,
I've been quite impressed with the running qualities of the Bachmann 44 tonner. Did Bachmann make a larger Bo'Bo' with similar motor bogies? Can anybody tell me the wheelbases and wheel sizes?
Regards, Greg.P.
"Frank A. Rosenbaum" wrote:
Reply to
Gregory Procter
Yes they will work by themselves. Pickup problems will be no worse than any other 4 wheel pickup model.
The only major problem is figuring out how to mount them. I use them to repower interurbans (including 2 in a BRASS North Shore Electroliner), and I usually butcher up the bachman fram to fit on top of the floor extending over a hole in the floor for the truck. New sideframes are easy, requiring only a spacer block and some epoxy to hold them on.
Don
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Reply to
Trainman
The only ones I know of that uses that particular configuration are the 44 ton and 70 ton. The trucks have 36" wheels and a 7 wheelbase.
Don
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Reply to
Trainman
I just measured mine again (I can't take it apart, it was a gift from the wife) and they all measure in the range .373-.374", or just under 33". I was measuring the flat part, just up against the flange.
Bill MacIndoe
Reply to
MacIndoe
Thanks everyone for all the help. I think that clinches it.
Bill MacIndoe
Reply to
MacIndoe
I was hoping the 70 tonner would give me a mechanism with a longer wheelbase :-( The 44 tonner falls between two wheelbase lengths I could use. Changing wheels is no real problem to me.
Regards, Greg.P.
Reply to
Gregory Procter
The 44 ton and 70 ton models used the same trucks and frame, just a different shell.
Don
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Reply to
Trainman
Thanks.
Tra> >
Reply to
Gregory Procter
Possibly. It has been a long time since I opened the Gas Electric. However, it does have as single power truck.
-- From the computer of Frank A. Rosenbaum
Reply to
Frank A. Rosenbaum
On 18 Jul 2003 18:01:30 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@bigfoot.com (Eric) shared this with the world:
So Bachmann makes something really useful for kitbashing, something that will sell to more than just people who want a 44 tonner, and when it comes time to re-run the production, they change it to remove the "best" part????
Are there any other commonly available, reasonable running (and affordable) locos with dual independent powered trucks?
Kent
Reply to
Kent Ashton
Kleinbahn of Austria.
Reply to
Gregory Procter
The trollies use a much smaller truck with around 26" wheels and a shorter wheelbase. The other MAJOR drawback is the "pancake" motor that can last anywhere from 2 minutes to 8 hours. We (our trollley club) practically have to buy them "in bulk" in order to keep half a dozen cars running.
I agree that Bachmann really "shot themselves in the foot" when they changed the 44 and 70 tonners.
Don
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Reply to
Trainman
(snippage)
From what I've heard and personal experience, the single power trucks on the 44 and 70 ton diesels are prone to burn out. I only use one of my 44 tonners to shuttle back and forth on a pair of modules during train shows. While I was trying it out at home, I noticed smoke coming form the model. I took off the body and lubricated it wherever I could, and it seemed to work fine after that. I read somewhere afterwards (probably here on r.m.r.) that the bearings are plain brass and not oil impregnated as on many models. They just dry out and then burn out if not lubricated. A friend used to use a pair on his large operating layout but had to retire them for this reason.
Perhaps the new single engined ones might be better? I don't have one myself.
Cheers,
Bob Boudreau Canada
Reply to
Railfan
Possibly they are if you're using them as a two truck locomotive. What we loved about the originals is that they were complete self-contained power trucks at a much lower price than spuds or pdt's and were the perfect size for our interurban equipment.
Don
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Reply to
Trainman
On Sat, 19 Jul 2003 21:14:23 +1200, Gregory Procter shared this with the world:
Commonly available?
Maybe in Europe and NZ, but I don't think so here in North America.
*sigh* Kent
Reply to
Kent Ashton
They supply from their own chain of shops around Austria, and direct by mail-order. AFAIK the are not on the web. They quite happily accept bank transfers in exchange for their products.
Ten years back the company split into "Kleinbahn" (excellent quality toy trains) and "Klein Modelbahn" (Nice Austrian models) (the brothers don't speak or co-operate with each other). There are quite a few models in common. Klein Modelbahn is on the web, but the prices are higher.
Regards, Greg.P.
Reply to
Gregory Procter
Same here, one of mine died after pushing a "track cleaner" special at a show, with a sibling pulling the car (some kind of new abrasive pad car, I wasn't impressed). Thought I smoked the decoder because it shorted on DCC when the throttle was turned up,but it ran(and smoked) on DC. Turned out to be fine debris between the sectors of the armature. Cleaned it thoroughly with an Exacto blade tip and retested it,relubed it and put it back in service. No more smoke, and no more abrasive track cleaners either! KarlB
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Reply to
Karl Bond
Why do you think so many people refer tho them as Botchmann? It's not because Homer J. Simpson is the company's product engineer. Well maybe it is.
Eric
Kent AshtSo Bachmann makes something really useful for kitbashing, something that will sell to more than just people who want a 44 tonner, and when it comes time to re-run the production, they change it to remove the "best" part????
Are there any other commonly available, reasonable running (and affordable) locos with dual independent powered trucks?
Reply to
Eric

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