Grinding wheel for tungstens?

Have a small bench grinder, specifically for grinding tungstens, and as it
time to replace to wheels, wonder what would be most suitable for this job?
Would a diamond resin wheel, intended for sharpening lathe tools, be better
than conventional stones perhaps?
Ken
Reply to
Nick
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Whatever you do, remember that tungsten is nasty stuff when inhaled. So don't get right in there and snort it. But, you will pick up some in just the regular grinding process at arm's length. Run a fan or a vacuum to reduce your exposure.
I've been grinding them for years, and apparently, there isn't anything wrong with me with me with me with me ............
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
Thought it was only thoriated tungstens that could possibly pose a health risk?
Nick
Reply to
nick
All the health hazards I have ever heard of related to tungsten grinding are from the thoriated variety.
To the original poster, as long as you grind the tunstens with the grind marks running lenghtwise on the tungsten, I don't think a fine stone would make a noticable difference over the normal cheapo wheel.
Bob
Reply to
MetalHead
Visit:
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I love google. A search for tunsten exposure, and you don't even have to think.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
To quote from the site you googled
"You are not likely to experience any health effects that would be related to exposure to tungsten or tungsten compounds."
From the MDS sheet that came with my tungsten grinder, says the danger is dust from thoriated tungsten, and grinding dust in general. (not tungsten in general) Its not a good idea to breath any grinding dust. Likewise don't breath fumes from welding with thoriated tungsten, or for that matter any welding fumes.
Of course if one looks, you can find someone that will say anything you want to do is dangerous.
Reply to
Diamond Jim
"Diamond Jim" wrote
That is so. But, I still like to have a fan going on the grinding wheel when I am grinding things I don't want coming right back in my face.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
As an afterthought, silica comes to mind. Some of the most dangerous stuff on the planet when taken into the lungs.
I think I read it somewhere. ;-)
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
Yep, silica ranks right up there with asbestos.
Reply to
Diamond Jim
"Diamond Jim" wrote
I flintknap. That is where a person takes raw materials and makes projectile points and tools, like the ancients did.
Obsidian, a volcanic glass, is a very popular material due to its low hardness factor, sharpness, and ease of working. It was also a favorite of the ancients.
Some prominent nappers have developed silicosis just from the dust that working with small amounts of obsidian creates, both from the material, and from the silica grinding wheels used for shaping.
Near my home, there is an old mining town called Delmar. Huge mills ground ore to a pulp, and the town was covered with silica dust. The average time a man could work in the mines was three months before he was down with silicosis so bad he couldn't work. The town was called "The Widomaker" by the survivors.
Tungsten isn't that bad of an element. Thoriated tungsten is worse. But combine it with a silica grinding wheel, and plant your face a foot from it, and you have a bad situation. Yes, I know people have done it for years, and the literature says that there isn't a lot of danger. So, if something kills you only a little at a time instead of all at once, is that less dangerous?
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
Bit like the depleted uranium munitions used by US forces against the people of Iraq and Afghanistan then I suppose Steve?
ken
Reply to
Richard
Actually Ken it is more like 9:30 pm February 13th, 1945, when the RAF started fire bombing a city with no military targets to speak of, and know to be packed with refugees. Ever hear of Dresden? Most there, weren't killed by the bombs but by the aftermath, the fire storms that started later that night..
Ahhhhh, but there was one big difference. (You say "people" in your post which implies civilians). Civilians were the target in Dresden. It hasn't been proved that civilians were the target of depleted uranium in Iraq and Afghanistan. Far more civilians were killed in Dresden than the total number of military and civilians deaths in Iraq and Afghanistan.
Oh by the way, didn't the UK forces fire a shot or two in Iraq? They use depleted uranium munitions also. In fact they were the ones that pioneered the use of depleted uranium, both in aviation as counterweights and in weapons as armor and projectiles.
Reply to
Diamond Jim
I wouldnt attempt in any way to deny the obvious atrocitys committed by the UK, in many parts of the world.
However WW2 is not in any way comparable to attacking the people of a largely defenceless third world country, with the primary objective of taking control of their oil reserves.
ken
Reply to
Richard
What the Hell has Dresden got to do with grinding tungstens. I wish folk would stick to the subject. Regards. Rotty
Reply to
Rotty
I use a yard sale grinder for grinding tungstens.
For new and badly messed-up electrodes, I use a medium-course silicon carbide wheel (the green kind). This roughs the point on.
For polishing, I use a 120 grit aluminum oxide wheel.
Always grind with the tungsten pointed up, so the grinder marks are in line with the electrode (longitude, not latitude lines).
Move the tungsten across the face of the wheel while you grind or you will wear grooves into the wheel.
Don't grind any soft metals like aluminum, copper, bronze, etc. on the wheels. Preferably, use the wheels only for tungsten-- although steel and stainless are not that bad.
Don't breath the dust--it's not healthy.
Cheers--Jeff Dantzler
Reply to
Jeff Dantzler
Thanks Jeff...................just what I was looking for.
Nick
Reply to
Nick
Fatally flawed basic assumption. Therefore the rest of your post is worthless.
Gunner
"Considering the events of recent years, the world has a long way to go to regain its credibility and reputation with the US." unknown
Reply to
Gunner
I use a bench mounted belt sander. Works just dandy.
Gunner
"Considering the events of recent years, the world has a long way to go to regain its credibility and reputation with the US." unknown
Reply to
Gunner

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